Symposium Summary: Crossing the Divide: Promoting Cross-Disciplinary Discussion between Inland and Marine Fisheries for Improved Sustainability

The mouth of the Klamath River on the Pacific Ocean, Del Norte County, California. River mouths are just one example of the interconnection between inland and marine waters discussed in our symposium. Credit: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

The mouth of the Klamath River on the Pacific Ocean, Del Norte County, California. River mouths are just one example of the interconnection between inland and marine waters discussed in our symposium. Credit: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

While marine and inland fisheries are often studied and managed independently, there are actually many similarities. Recognizing and communicating the reasons for the similarities and differences between marine and inland fisheries can generate useful insights towards improving the management and sustainability of both fisheries. The presentations in this symposium highlighted science and management lessons that could be shared between inland and marine fisheries. Important similarities between these fisheries included: managing for diverse gear types and use of closed areas, impacts of exploitation of higher trophic levels on ecosystems, environmental and seasonal factors influencing fish production, inclusion of often overlooked subsistence fishing, and the complexity of inter-jurisdictional fisheries. Managers of both inland and marine fisheries face the same fundamental conflict between use and conservation of fisheries resources, challenges in matching the scale of management to the scale of ecosystem and fish population dynamics, and limited resources for management, especially for enforcement and assessment. Because many of the fundamental issues faced by marine and inland fisheries are similar, examining these underlying dynamics and learning from each other can provide novel insights that will enhance our abilities to effectively manage our marine and freshwater fisheries more sustainably now and in the future.   — So-Jung Youn, Michigan State University, [email protected] Read the symposium abstracts here.