Fisheries Newsletter News Bits – Higgins Eye Pearly Mussels

Researchers confirmed last year that the federally endangered Higgins eye pearly mussel is reproducing naturally in the Wapsipinicon River below Central City. …… “We found adults in the Iowa in 2011 and this year we are hoping to find their offspring,” said Department of Natural Resources fisheries research biologist Scott Gritters, the state’s mussel recovery.. read more →

Fisheries Newsletter News Bits – AFS Members Estuaries Research

AFS Member Joe Nohner leads research that offers the first comprehensive look at changes in land cover, river flow, pollution and nutrient levels in America’s estuaries. It’s a first look for a lot of eyes. Estuaries are tended to by many agencies at the federal, state, local and non-profit levels.  Land use changes, through commercial and.. read more →

Fisheries Newsletter News Bits – Not Exactly Jellyfish

“The scientific name is Velella velella,” said David Bader, director of education at the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach, California. “They’re jelly-like creatures, but they’re not exactly jellyfish.” read more →

Fisheries Newsletter News Bits – There’s Always a Bigger Fish

There’s always a bigger fish OR gone in one bite. read more →

Fisheries Newsletter News Bits – Sunscreen and Plankton

Sunscreen may be TOXIC to sea creatures and disrupt the ocean’s food chain, scientists warn Spanish scientists looked at the environmental impact of sunscreen Sunscreen ingredients Titanium dioxide and zinc oxide react with UV light They form compounds such as hydrogen peroxide High amounts of hydrogen peroxide could harm phytoplankton If this happens, larger animals which feed.. read more →

Fisheries Newsletter News Bits – Mysterious Aquatic Blob

Mysterious, Unidentified Red Blob? Is it a Sea Slug? A mysterious aquatic creature has washed up on the shore at Mudjimba Beach in the Sunshine Coast of Australia.It is unclear what the creature is and has caused much speculation on Twitter. The creature is bright red, has no eyes, mouth or limbs and feels spongy.. read more →

How To Talk To Fish or How Fish Talk or Why Would Anyone Care About Talking To A Catfish?

We’ve known that fish make noises for thousands of years. Pull a grouper out of the water and you can hear for yourself. But since sound travels exceptionally large distances underwater, most fish are very strategic and quiet about the noises they emit. It was only with the invention of underwater microphones, called hydrophones, after World War II that.. read more →