AMERICAN FISHERIES SOCIETY PROCEDURES

AMERICAN FISHERIES SOCIETY PROCEDURES
Adopted by the Governing Board of the American Fisheries Society (October 30, 2006)
Page last updated February 11, 2014

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AFS Procedures_FEBRUARY 2014

PREFACE
Procedures are the lowest level of formal documentation of AFS operations.  The Constitution and Rules are higher and they are described in the Constitution. Procedures are intended to remind AFS volunteers and staff of what to do and how to do it. This was a major revision. The last “procedural manual” was published in 1992.  Since then there have been many changes and the manual was not revised to keep up.  The Constitution and Rules have been revised and substantial changes were made in governance such as the creation of the Management Committee.  This committee hopes that Procedure updates will be a routine part of Governing Board and Committee business.  The new document will only be available electronically so revisions can be made easily.

The old Procedural Manual included a mix of general information and procedures.  This revision attempted to remove the general information from procedures.  A “Unit Survival Manual” also exists that includes a wide range of information.  The information removed from the old Procedural Manual is going to be added to the Unit Survival Manual (USM).  Concurrently an update will be made to the USM.

Respectfully Submitted,
Special Committee on Society Procedures.  Dirk Miller, Chair, Ira Adelman, Mary Fabrizio, Carolina Franco, Fred Harris, Joe Margraf, Gus Rassam, and Gwen White

September 10, 2005 (original revision) Updates based on Governing Board approvals on:
September 14, 2006 (Lake Placid) March 10, 2007 (Atlanta) September 1, 2007 (San Francisco) March 8, 2008 (Annapolis)
August 16, 2008 (Ottawa) March 7, 2009 (Bethesda) August 29, 2009 (Nashville) September 3, 2011 (Seattle)
August 18, 2012 (Minneapolis/St. Paul) March 2, 2013 (Bethesda)
September 7, 2013 (Little Rock)

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Table of Contents

SOCIETY OFFICERS …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 1
General Responsibilities of All Officers…………………………………………………………………………. 1
Sample MOU for Service as an American Fisheries Society Officer………………………………….. 4
Executive Director Succession Plan ………………………………………………………………………………. 7
Performance Evaluation of the Executive Officer ……………………………………………………………. 9
Purpose…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 12
Composition and Meetings …………………………………………………………………………………………. 12
Governing Board Meeting Agenda ………………………………………………………………………………. 13
Responsibilities of Governing Board Members……………………………………………………………… 14
Management Committee …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 15
Conflict of Interest Policy and Procedures ……………………………………………………………………. 17
Conflict of Interest – Disclosure Form ……………………………………………………………………… 19
Guidelines for Preparation of Reports to the Governing Board ……………………………………….. 23
Format for Governing Board Reports ……………………………………………………………………….. 24
Example Midyear Report to the Governing Board ……………………………………………………… 26
Procedures for Electronic Voting ………………………………………………………………………………… 28
DIVISIONS………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 32
Purposes …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 32
Officers and Duties ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 32
Standing Committees …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 34
SECTIONS ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 35
Purposes …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 35
Officers and Duties ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 36
Standing Committees …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 37
CHAPTERS AND OTHER UNITS ………………………………………………………………………………… 38
Purposes …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 39
Officers and Duties ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 40
Standing Committees …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 41
STANDING AND SPECIAL COMMITTEES …………………………………………………………………. 42
Responsibilities of Committee Chairs ………………………………………………………………………….. 43
Responsibilities of Committee Members………………………………………………………………………. 46
Purposes, Composition, and Duties of Standing Committees ………………………………………….. 47
Arrangements Committee ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 47
Audit Committee……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 48
Awards Committee ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 49
Board of Appeals …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 50
Board of Professional Certification…………………………………………………………………………… 51
Constitutional Consultant………………………………………………………………………………………… 53
Continuing Education Committee…………………………………………………………………………….. 53
Electronic Services Advisory Board …………………………………………………………………………. 55
Endangered Species Committee ………………………………………………………………………………. 56
Ethics and Professional Conduct Committee……………………………………………………………… 57
External Affairs Committee …………………………………………………………………………………….. 57
Liaisons ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 58
Investment Committee ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 59
Meeting Oversight Committee…………………………………………………………………………………. 59
Membership Committee………………………………………………………………………………………….. 60
Names of Aquatic Invertebrates Committee ………………………………………………………………. 61
Names of Fishes Committee ……………………………………………………………………………………. 61
New Initiatives Coordinator…………………………………………………………………………………….. 62
Nominating Committee…………………………………………………………………………………………… 63
Past Constitutional Consultant’s Advisory Council ……………………………………………………. 65
Past Presidents’ Advisory Council……………………………………………………………………………. 65
Program Committee ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 66
Publications Award Committee (See also Awards section of Procedures) …………………….. 66
Publications Overview Committee …………………………………………………………………………… 68
Raffle Committee …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 69
Resolutions Committee …………………………………………………………………………………………… 69
Resource Policy Committee…………………………………………………………………………………….. 72
Time and Place Committee ……………………………………………………………………………………… 73
Vote Auditor ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….
SOCIETY AWARDS ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 75
OPERATIONAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES …………………………………………………………. 86
Developing and Advancing AFS Positions on Resource Issues ……………………………………….. 87
Procedures for Developing and Advancing Resource Policy Statements ………………………. 88
Procedures for Submitting, Considering, and Implementing Resolutions ………………………. 93
Society Advocacy and Unit Procedures …………………………………………………………………….. 94
Lobbying Information and Guidelines ………………………………………………………………………. 97
Publications Policies ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 98
A.  Comprehensive Publications Policy…………………………………………………………………….. 98
B.  Publications Policy-Symposium Series………………………………………………………………. 101
C. Recruitment, Review, and Retention of Editors……………………………………………………. 102
Continuing Education Courses ………………………………………………………………………………….. 105
Topic-Oriented Meetings (TOMs) ……………………………………………………………………………… 106
Topic Oriented Hill Seminars ……………………………………………………………………………………. 109
Meeting Support ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 111
PROGRAM PLANNING AND FINANCIAL PLANNING……………………………………………… 113
A.  Definitions……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 113
B.  Financial Policies ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 113
C.  Possible Financial Pitfalls ………………………………………………………………………………… 116
Investment Objectives and Guidelines ……………………………………………………………………….. 116
Planned Giving Program…………………………………………………………………………………………… 123
New Initiatives ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 126
Disaster Relief…………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 130
Fisheries Conservation Foundation ……………………………………………………………………………. 134
ANNUAL MEETING GUIDELINES ……………………………………………………………………………. 137
Foreword ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 137
Bidding for an Annual Meeting …………………………………………………………………………………. 137
Tips for Successful Submissions ……………………………………………………………………………. 137
Remuneration ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 138
Suggested Timeline………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 138
Two Years Out …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 138
Year Before The Meeting ……………………………………………………………………………………… 139
Year Of The Meeting ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 142
Annual Meeting Structure And Organization ………………………………………………………………. 149
Local Arrangements ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 151
Accommodations Subcommittee ………………………………………………………………………… 154
Audio Visual Aids Subcommittee ………………………………………………………………………. 155
Registration Subcommittee ………………………………………………………………………………… 156
Budget and Finance Subcommittee …………………………………………………………………….. 157
Fundraising Subcommittee ………………………………………………………………………………… 158
Social Activities, & Entertainment Subcommittee ………………………………………………… 159
Program Committee ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 160
Printing Subcommittee………………………………………………………………………………………. 162
Publicity Subcommittee …………………………………………………………………………………….. 163
Trade Show Subcommittee ………………………………………………………………………………… 166
Tours, Transportation, and Information Subcommittee………………………………………….. 167
Welcome and Protocol Subcommittee…………………………………………………………………. 167
Signs Subcommittee………………………………………………………………………………………….. 168
Raffle Subcommittee ………………………………………………………………………………………… 168
Guidelines and Suggestions For Promoting Diversity At AFS Conferences and Meetings … 169
Levels of Support – American Fisheries Society Annual Meeting …………………………………. 171

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SOCIETY OFFICERS

 

 

Leadership of the American Fisheries Society is vested in its six officers.  These include five

(non-salaried) officers elected by society-wide voting and a sixth (salaried) officer, the Executive Director, chosen by the Governing Board.  The five elected offices are Second Vice-President, First Vice-President, President-Elect, President, and Immediate Past President.

 

Officers generally serve the Society for five years, moving progressively through the hierarchy of officer positions.  This structure assures a continuity of leadership and assures that each person understands the full operation of the Society before taking the most important office of AFS President.

 

Offices of Immediate Past-President and AFS President are filled automatically by the current AFS President and President-Elect, respectively.  Offices of President-Elect, First Vice- President, and Second Vice-President are filled by a ballot election each year.  Generally the ballot lists only the current First Vice-President as candidate for President-Elect and only the current Second Vice-President as candidate for First Vice-President.  Candidates for Second Vice-President are chosen in one of two ways, through the Nominating Committee (which operates each year) or through petition.

 

If necessary a memorandum of understanding must be signed between the government agency of the AFS officer and AFS.  An example of such an MOU is presented below.

 

General Responsibilities of All Officers

 

The specific descriptions of officers’ duties, on the following pages and in the following chapters, emphasize the required operational duties.  The most important responsibility, however, is to provide leadership to the Society and the profession.  During the five years an elected officer serves, this person must be a trustworthy, objective, and effective representative of the profession.  As a representative for the members, each Society officer must represent the

worldwide concerns of fisheries professionals.  They must use their knowledge and experience to direct the profession in ways that will have long-term beneficial influence for the resources and people important to our Society.

 

All officers are members of the Governing Board and are expected to attend all meetings and represent Society-level concerns.  They must be thoroughly familiar with the Constitution, Rules, Procedures and other programs and policies of the Society.  Additionally, they must understand fully the financial and operating status of the Society in order to explain these aspects to members.

 

Society officers, along with unit officers, are a major conduit for expression of member concerns to the Governing Board and the Society staff.  As such, they must communicate broadly with members of all backgrounds and professional employment.  They must seek opportunities to meet with Society members and listen to their interests and concerns.

 

Elected officers are fully engaged on a daily basis with AFS affairs and as such, they bring Society-level perspectives and insights to the mix of Division and Section perspectives on the Management Committee and the Governing Board.  The elected officer hierarchy serves to enhance the networking, relationship building, and understanding of each officer through

 

participation as members of the Management Committee, the Governing Board, and the membership at large.

 

Although a time commitment has never been assigned to these responsibilities, it is expected that Society officers will reduce their involvement in other professional activities to a low level, including their participation in AFS unit activities.  Furthermore, it is expected that the

employers of Society officers will consider their AFS responsibilities as a major component of their work and protect them from ancillary or short-notice work assignments as fully as possible.

 

Each officer has specific responsibilities, as described in Article III C of the Constitution and elsewhere in these Procedures.  Specific responsibilities of individual officers include:

 

President

1.   Makes appointments, including standing committees, as authorized by the

Constitution;

2.   Establish and appoint special committees and consultants as required;

3.   Exercise responsibilities arising from actions of the Society and the Governing Board;

4.   Chairs all Society, Governing Board, and Management Committee meetings;

5.   Provides direction to the Executive Director when the Governing Board is not in session;

6.   Contributes a “President’s Hook” monthly for inclusion in Fisheries;

7.   Prepares reports of Society activities and status to the Governing Board for the mid- year and annual meetings of the Governing Board, and to the Society for the annual meeting;

8.   Contributes to the annual Society Meeting by planning the Plenary Session,

overseeing Local Arrangements and Program committees, working with Society staff; advancing the theme for meeting; and coordinating attendance of officers at various meetings;

9.   Collaborates with the President-elect in development of Governing Board retreat held in conjunction with the annual Society meeting; and

10. Oversees the evaluation of the Executive Director and negotiates the contract of the

Executive Director.

 

President-elect

1.   Assumes the duties of the President when that officer is temporarily or permanently

unable to act;

2.   Serves as a voting member of the Governing Board and Management Committee;

3.   Selects the Chair of the Local Arrangements Committee for the annual Society meeting two years hence and serves on the Arrangements Committee and Program Committee for that meeting;

4.  Serves on the following committees in the manner stated:

(1) Carl R. Sullivan Fishery Conservation Award Committee, Chair; (2) Distinguished Service Award Committee, Chair;

(3) Membership Committee, Member;

(4) Resource Policy Committee, Member;

(5) Electronic Services Advisory Board, Member; (6) Publications Overview Committee, Member;

 

5.  Participates in routine communications regarding Society business conducted by the

President and Executive Director.

 

First Vice-president

1.   Assumes the duties of the President-elect when that officer is temporarily unable to

act and serve;

2.   Serves as a voting member of the Governing Board and Management Committee:

3.   Works to form the Local Arrangements Committee annual Society meeting three years hence;

4.   Serves on the following committees in the manner stated: (1) Awards Committee, Chair;

(2) Membership Committee, Chair;

(3) Carl R. Sullivan Conservation Award Committee, Member; (4) Ethics and Professional Conduct Committee, Member;

(5) Resolutions Committee, Member.

 

Second Vice-president

1.   Assumes the duties of the First Vice-president when that officer is temporarily unable

to act and serve;

2.   Serves as a voting member of the Governing Board and Management Committee;

3.   Selects the Chair of the Program Committee for the annual Society meeting four years hence;

4.   Serves on the following committees in the manner stated: (1) Membership Committee, Vice-chair;

(2) Board of Appeals, Member;

(3) Meritorious Service Award Committee, Member; (4) Time and Place Committee, Member.

 

Immediate Past-president

1.  Serves as a voting member of the Governing Board and Management Committee;

2.  Conducts annual Executive Director evaluation and interviews of Society staff;

3.  Serves on the following committees in the manner stated: (1) Past President’s Advisory Council, Chair;

(2) President’s Fishery Conservation Award Committee, Chair;

(3) William E. Ricker Resource Conservation Award Committee, Chair; (4) Retired Members Travel Award Committee, Chair;

(5) Nominating Committee, Member.

 

Sample MOU for Service as an American Fisheries Society Officer

 

MEMORANDUM

 

 

 

To:                      Jeff Hardgrove, Region 1 Employee Relations Specialist From:            Carl Burger, Director, Abernathy Technology Center Subject:   MOU for Service as Officer, American Fisheries Society Date:     December 11, 1998

Please find attached the Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the American Fisheries Society (AFS), customized for my service as an officer in the Society.  This may well be the MOU you referred to in our telephone discussion today.  I used the same instrument when I was President of the Society’s Western Division in 1994, and have basically updated it to reflect my present (First Vice-President) and future annual positions (President-Elect; AFS President; and Immediate Past President) at the AFS national level.  I believe that Dan Raisovich (former Ethics Counselor in the Service’s previous Research Division; Region 8) developed this MOU and process so that Service Fish and Wildlife Biologists could serve as officers in professional societies.

 

I am attaching two signed originals of the MOU should the Service and the Society each wish to retain one.  In a past discussion with Paul Brouha (former Executive Director of AFS), he indicated he had spoken with the Service’s Deputy Ethics Counselor and the consensus was that an exemption should be requested so that I may complete my service as an AFS elected officer. If an exemption is needed, I would certainly like to request that it be initiated.

 

I have discussed this matter with my present supervisor (Mr. Dan Diggs, Region 1 PARD- Fisheries), who I am copying with this correspondence.  Previously, I briefed Bill Shake

(GARD) and Chuck Dunn (former supervisor).  All have expressed support for my ongoing AFS

service because of the varied benefits and opportunities it provides to each party.

 

Please advise should further details be required, or if any changes are needed to the MOU. Thanks for your assistance,

 

 

Carl V. Burger

 

Abernathy Salmon Culture Technology Center

 

1440 Abernathy Road Longview, WA 98632 (360) 425-6072

(360) 636-1855 FAX

 

cc: Dan Diggs, PARD-Fisheries

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Memorandum of Understanding between the

Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Department of the Interior and the

American Fisheries Society

 

 

 

I. Purpose

 

The purpose of the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is to establish guidelines and organizational arrangements that will provide a cooperative working relationship between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) and the American Fisheries Society (Society) with respect to employees of the Service serving as officers of the Society.  This MOU will serve to define the conditions, procedures, limits, and benefits of such professional service to the Service and the Society by Service employees.

 

II. Background and Authorities

 

The Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, is charged with the responsibility for carrying out programs relating to fish and wildlife throughout the nation in accordance with the Fish and Wildlife Act of 1956 (16 U.S.C. 661-667(e)), as amended; and other authorities.

 

The Society is incorporated as a professional, not-for-profit organization to promote the conservation, development, and wise use of fishery resources; promote and evaluate the development and advancement of all branches of fishery science and practice; gather and disseminate to the Society and the general public scientific, technical, and other information about fishery science and practice through publications, meetings, and other forms of communications; and encourage the teaching of fishery science and practice in colleges and universities and continuing professional development of fishery workers.

 

The Service and Society recognize the compatibility of their purposes and responsibilities and

the need to cooperate on matters of mutual interest.  Professional service of Service employees in Society leadership positions will be beneficial to both natural resource agencies/organizations and, more importantly, to the people and fishery resources of the United States.

 

A.  Benefits to the Service

 

In this position, Carl V. Burger will interact with a diversity of fishery resource managers including directors of State and Federal fishery agencies and fishery constituency groups. He will also be required to achieve a high level of performance from colleagues who volunteer to assist the Fish and Wildlife Service and the Society.  These experiences and training provided by the Society at Annual and Mid-Year Governing Board meetings will increase Carl V. Burger’s leadership skills.  These skills will benefit the Service in Carl’s performance of tasks in his present and future positions with the Service.

 

In this position, Carl V. Burger will be aware of contemporary fishery management issues, programs, and trends nationwide.  This awareness will be passed to the Service and allow the Service to appropriately set and manage programs to remain a leader in fishery resource management.  Carl V. Burger’s contacts with diverse fishery managers and fishery administrators will ensure, as appropriate, Service input and involvement in

 

fishery management issues and programs.  These contacts will also provide opportunities for input and feedback from professional fishery resource managers that can be used to fine-tune present and future Service fishery management programs.

 

Lastly, Carl V. Burger’s active involvement with the Society and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service demonstrates to the fishery management community the Service’s active interest and concern for the conservation and management of the nation’s fishery resources.

 

B.  Benefits to the Society

 

The Society will benefit from Carl V. Burger’s service and administrative support provided by the Service to perform the duties of Society 1st VP, President-Elect, AFS President, and Immediate Past President.

 

III.  Terms of Agreement

 

A.  Pursuant to this MOU, the Service and the Society agree that the service of Carl V. Burger as 1st VP, President-Elect, AFS President, and Immediate Past President of the Society and as a member of the American Fisheries Society, will be of mutual benefit.

 

B.  The Service authorizes Carl V. Burger to conduct routine business of his Society office during normal working hours, to use Service communication equipment and services in the conduct of Society business, to use secretarial services from the Service, and to travel to meetings and other official Society functions during working hours and at Service expense, in so far as such activity does not unduly interfere with the accomplishment of the duties and responsibilities of his position and other Service business.

 

C.  The Society will provide Carl V. Burger with office supplies as needed for Society business.

 

D.  The Society recognizes the primacy of Service policies and positions as guiding principles for Carl’s official actions and decisions in any situation where there is a potential for conflict between Service and Society positions and policies.  The employee shall excuse himself from being a party to any issue of the Society that could be construed as a conflict of interest with his official duties and responsibilities as a Service employee.

 

IV.  Effective Dates

 

This MOU will become effective upon signature of the approving officials of the respective agencies/organizations entering into the MOU.  The terms of this MOU will remain in effect until completion of Carl V. Burger’s tenure as 1st VP, President-Elect, AFS President, and Immediate Past President in September, 2002.  This MOU may be terminated at any time by mutual agreement or by 30-day advance written notice by either party.

 

SIGNATURE BLOCKS

 

Executive Director Succession Plan

 

Background

The American Fisheries Society employs an Executive Director who serves as the Secretary and

Treasurer of the Society, and manages the Society’s daily activities, implements Society policies and advances Society objectives as set forth in the Constitution, Rules and Procedures, and in Governing Board directives. The AFS Governing Board establishes the base salary, other compensation, and duties of the Executive Director, whereas the Executive Director establishes the base salaries and other compensation for other Society staff (AFS Constitution and Rules, September 1, 2009).

 

Refer to the AFS Strategic Plan for a summary of other issues in the current environment that also may affect AFS leadership in the future.

 

Succession Planning (adapted from Wolfred 2008, with excerpts as noted)

 

Succession planning is a risk management practice that is critical to ensuring the viability of an organization such as AFS. A governing board can be both energized and reassured by succession planning, which provides the opportunity for high-level strategy development. Many nonprofit organizations are led by executives who are Baby Boomers, and the next generation of leaders may have new ideas and ways of conducting business for organizations. The leaders from the Generation X and Generation Y that will most likely take over leadership positions may seek to restructure the role of executive director to fit the lifestyle of those generations that seek a

healthy balance between work life and personal life, and that work toward shared or collaborative leadership.

 

There are three approaches to succession planning: 1) strategic leader development, 2) emergency succession planning, and 3) departure-defined succession planning. Strategic leader development, which should be an ongoing effort for all professionals, focuses on and defines the strategic vision of an organization, identifies leadership and management needed to carry out the vision, and recruits and maintains individuals who have or want to develop those skills. Emergency succession planning is used when an executive director or other leader have an unplanned departure. Departure-defined succession planning is used when a long-term leader announces their departure two or more years in advance. This type of planning identifies the organization’s goals for the future, determines the information or tools needed to achieve those goals, and devotes attention to building capacity of the organization to sustain funding and programs for the future. The third type of succession planning represents the strategy AFS needs to adopt under the current situation, although elements of the other plans should be considered.

 

Departure–defined succession planning is recommended for organizations with long-tenured executive directors with definite departure dates. At least 18 months of preparation are required prior to the scheduled departure. The goal of this planning effort is to build leadership strength and help facilitate a successful search for new leadership by assessing the organization’s traits, resources and their status. The departing executive director should consider questions about his legacy, future career plans, and personal finances. The departing executive director’s final two leadership tasks are the “leadership of letting go” and the “leadership of preparing the way.” An

 

organization also must let go of their executive director, offering a full and generous goodbye. A critical first step is to conduct a “sustainability audit,” which is a survey of administrative operations and resource relationships. This audit identifies key points of organizational vulnerability that could inhibit organization functioning. High-risk situations are when the executive director has taken on “whatever needs to be done,” which results in the equivalent of the executive performing more than one job and replacing him nearly impossible. This situation may require an administrative restructuring, which could include the creation of a new management position to assume some of the functions of the current executive. The organization should look at how leadership can be cooperatively shared throughout the organization to reduce dependency on the executive and take advantage of staff development opportunities. The successor will thrive if he inherits a doable job description with a competent team that shares management and leadership responsibilities. To accomplish succession planning, an special committee should be appointed and act on behalf of the governing board to provide oversight of the succession planning process and craft a succession plan for the board to review and approve.

 

Wolfred recommends that when creating a succession plan for a long-term executive, an organization should consider the following activities, which address the elements critical that will facilitate the success of the next executive director. Wolfred’s list of “The Nuts and Bolts of Departure-Defined Succession Planning” is the following:

 

1.   Deal with personal and professional barriers for the departing ED, for example:

  • Future employability concerns;
    • Inadequate retirement savings;
    • Unfinished business in the current job; and/or
    • Loss of identity and status attached to current job.

2.   Set the departure date after discussion and in agreement with the departing ED.

3.   Form a Succession Planning Committee.

4.   Prepare a communications plan (how soon to tell whom and by what means).

5.   Identify organizational vulnerabilities via a “sustainability audit.”

6.   Design and implement strategies to address the vulnerabilities.

7.   Identify the organization’s broad strategic directions three to five years out.

8.   Solidify the management team in light of organizational vulnerabilities and skills demanded by the strategic directions.

9.   Build the Board’s leadership abilities.

10. Back-up key executive relationships.

11. Put finances in order.

12. Build financial reserves and secure multi-year program funding.

13. Agree on the parameters of the ED’s emeritus role, if one is set up.

14. Set the executive search strategy, i.e., decide whether or not to use an executive recruiter.

 

Succession Readiness Checklist

Wolfred states that, “When the following conditions are in place, an organization can expect a

relatively smooth transition to new leadership whenever it might occur. An organization might determine which elements below are lacking in its current operations and then create a

‘succession plan’ or ‘capacity building plan’ that prescribes activities and timelines for filling the

 

gaps. The organization is then ready for leadership transitions, foreseen or unforeseen.” Wolfred’s succession readiness checklist is:

 

  • A strategic plan is in place with goals and objectives for the near term (up to three years), including objectives for leadership talent development.
  • The board evaluates the executive director annually on general performance and achievement of strategic goals.
  • The board, based on its annual self-evaluation, is satisfactorily performing its major governance jobs—financial oversight, executive support and oversight, policy development, and strategic planning.
  • The executive’s direct reports, based on annual evaluations, are judged as solidly skilled for their positions.
  • The top management cohort, as a high performing team:

o Has a solid team culture in place in which members support one another and can reach decisions as a group efficiently and harmoniously;

o Shares leadership of the organization with the executive in having significant input to all major organization decisions;

o Can lead the organization in the absence of the executive; and

o Has authority to make and carry out decisions within their respective areas of

responsibility.

  • Another staff person or officer shares important external relationships (major donors, funders, community leaders) maintained by the executive.
  • A financial reserve is in place with a minimum of one-year operating capital.
    • Financial systems meet industry standards. Financial reports are up to date and provide the data needed by the board and senior managers responsible for the organization’s financial strength and viability.
    • Operational manuals exist for key administrative systems and are easily accessible and up to date.
    • Top program staff have documented their key activities in writing and have identified another staff person who can carry their duties in an emergency.

 

References and Resources

Wolfred, T. 2008. Building leaderful organizations: succession planning for nonprofits.

Executive Transition Monograph Series, Volume 6. The Annie E. Casey Foundation, Baltimore, Maryland.

 

 

Performance Evaluation of the Executive Officer

 

Purpose: This document serves as an outline for the process to be followed to complete the annual performance evaluation of the AFS Executive Director.

 

According to the wording of the current contract, the Society’s five elected officers will review the performance of the Executive Director each year at the Society’s annual meeting.  This evaluation will be based on performance criteria and goals provided in writing to the Executive Director at the beginning of the period under review. The performance grades are:

 

  • Exceeds expectations: exceeds expectations in all job elements.
  • Proficient:  meets all (may exceed in some) job elements.
    • Unsatisfactory: fails to meet one or more of the job elements without acceptable reason.

 

The AFS President will lead the annual performance evaluation with participation of all elected officers. The process will have several elements of documentation:

 

a.   Self-evaluation of Plan of Work performance by the Executive Director  (Due three- to-four weeks before Annual Meeting).

 

b.   Summary of strengths and weaknesses of staff management by office department heads (conducted and compiled by the Past President).

 

c.   Evaluation of Plan of Work performance by individual Governing Board members (AFS President will send a memo to Governing Board requesting comments submitted to the AFS President in advance, and reminding the Governing Board about the opportunity to provide comments at the in camera session of the annual Governing Board meeting).

 

The AFS President will collect evaluations and comments three-to-four weeks before Annual Meeting and submit a summary to the elected officers to review before the annual meeting.  At the annual meeting, the officers will assemble for a formal discussion of the evaluation, and prepare a summary evaluation and recommendation of performance grade.  Additional comments from Governing Board members will be solicited at an in camera session of the Governing

Board, and the AFS President will summarize the evaluation and recommendations of the officers.  Following discussion and additional feedback, the AFS President will share the summary evaluation and recommendation with the Executive Director, and a written summary will be placed in the Executive Director’s personnel file.

 

In all years, the AFS President will also lead a brief mid-term evaluation of the Executive Director with participation of the elected officers during the mid-term meeting of the Society.  At this time, the Governing Board will comment on performance of the Executive Director at an in camera session held during the mid-term meeting.  This information will be summarized by the AFS President and conveyed to the Executive Director to aid in defining items needing mid-term correction or in recognizing outstanding achievements.

 

Executive Director Salary Determination

 

Purpose: This document serves as an outline for the process to be followed to complete the salary negotiation with the AFS Executive Director.

 

The performance of the Executive Director will be reviewed each year by the Society’s five (5) elected Officers during the Society’s annual meeting. This evaluation will be based on performance criteria and goals provided in writing by the Executive Director and agreed to by

the Society’s Officers at the beginning of the period under review. Performance will generally be

judged on the following job elements:

 

  • Effectively manage the Society’s daily activities, business operations and staff

appointments as the Society’s Business Manager;

  • Accurately maintain the Society’s official records and communications as the Society’s

Secretary;

  • Exhibit a high degree of fiduciary responsibility in managing the Society’s financial

status and resources in the Executive’s role as the Society’s Treasurer;

  • Engage in and promote responsible and timely communication and information transfer among units, the membership, staff and other Society sponsored entities;
  • Provide leadership in achievement of the Society’s strategic direction according to

existing Strategic Plans.

 

Yearly performance grades are evaluated as follows:

 

 

  • Exceptional: exceeds expectation in all job elements involving the business, management, and leadership of the Society.
  • Proficient: meets expectations in all job elements with exceptional performance in at least some aspects.
  • Fully Satisfactory: meets expectations in all job elements.
    • Unsatisfactory: failure to meet one or more of the job elements without acceptable reason; six months will be allowed to improve performance, and failure to do so will result in cancellation of the Contract Agreement.

 

The salary of the Executive for each calendar year of the Contract Agreement will depend on the annual performance review by elected Officers, and the percentage cost-of-living adjustments (COLA) awarded to U.S. Federal executive employees in the Washington, D.C., area for that calendar year. A discretionary yearly salary increase of up to 5% of the previous year’s base salary may be awarded, based on performance relative to the Executive’s Annual Plan of Work. The new annual salary is calculated by applying the discretionary merit increase first, then the appropriate Washington, D.C., COLA (which includes the locality differential).

 

The Governing Board reviews and approves the annual budget which includes the Executive Director’s salary in the single budget line-item for personnel salaries (i.e., the Executive Director’s salary is not provided separately).

 

GOVERNING BOARD

 

Purpose

 

The Governing Board is the ultimate authority for the operation of the Society.  It is the equivalent of a board of directors, deciding policy for the Society, authorizing its operations, hiring its Executive Director, and making financial decisions.

 

Composition and Meetings

 

The Governing Board consists of voting and nonvoting members.  Voting members are the five elected Society officers, Presidents and Presidents-Elect of the four Divisions, and Presidents of all Sections with at least 50 members at the end of the previous calendar year.  Nonvoting members are Presidents of Sections with fewer than 50 members, the President of the Student Subsection of the Education Section, Presidents of Chapters, the Constitutional Consultant, and the Society’s Executive Director.

 

The Governing Board normally meets at three different times and two locations each year.  The two fall meetings occur in conjunction with the Society’s annual meeting.  They normally consist of a one-day meeting before the Society’s annual meeting and a one-half-day meeting at the end of the annual meeting; the latter (designated as the Incoming Governing Board Meeting) includes newly elected officers, new Division Presidents and Presidents-Elect, new Section Presidents,

and other representatives.  The third meeting is intended as a midyear meeting occurring one day in the spring at a location determined by the AFS President in consultation with the Executive Director.

 

The Society’s President chairs meetings of the Governing Board.  Each meeting is operated from an agenda prepared jointly by the Executive Director and the AFS President.   R obert’s  R ules  of  Order is the formal guideline for conduct of the meetings.

 

Meetings are open to the Society’s members, who may observe and participate in the discussions as guests recognized by the chair.  Guests may not vote or introduce agenda items.  The Governing Board may go into a closed (in camera) session (i.e., attended only by the Officers, Division and Section representatives, and the Constitutional Consultant) at any time to discuss personnel matters, but the chair must document and announce results of the closed session immediately after its conclusion. The Constitutional Consultant attends in camera sessions to provide advice on parliamentary procedure.

 

 

Member and nonmember parliamentary rights are summarized as follows:

 

Executive Director - nonvoting member, makes reports, cannot make motions, and does not attend in camera sessions due to possibility of personnel reviews being conducted.

 

Constitutional Consultant - nonvoting member, can raise agenda items but cannot make motions, and attends in camera sessions for parliamentary assistance.  As an Active Member, the Constitutional Consultant can make motions in the Society Annual Business Meeting.

 

Officers, Division Presidents and Presidents-Elect - voting member, can raise agenda items and make motions, and attends in camera sessions.

 

Section presidents – voting member if the section has at least 50 active members, can raise agenda items and make motions regardless of section size, and attends in camera sessions.

 

Chapter Presidents - nonvoting member, can raise and discuss agenda items as Governing Board members, cannot make motions, and does not attend in camera sessions. Chapters do not vote because they are represented on the board by two voting members from their Division.

 

 

President of the Student Subsection of the Education Section – nonvoting member, can raise and discuss agenda items as Governing Board members, cannot make motions, and does not attend in camera sessions.

 

Guests - nonmembers, nonvoting, cannot raise agenda items or make motions, does not attend in camera sessions, and can speak only if recognized by the Chair.

 

Committee chairs - gives reports, can make a motion only if they are also a member of the Governing Board (in a dual role). No second is needed regardless of Governing Board membership unless it is committee of one person.

 

CLICK TO DOWNLOAD THE AMERICAN FISHERIES SOCIETY (AFS) PROCEDURES MANUAL

 

Governing Board Meeting Agenda

 

Governing Board meetings normally cover a specified set of agenda items in addition to old and new business.  The following agenda items normally occur:

 

1.  Call to order by the AFS President

 

2.  AFS President’s remarks

 

3.  Determination of a quorum

 

4.  Introduction of guests and visitors

 

5.  Executive Director’s report

 

6.  Division reports

 

7.  Section reports

 

8.  Standing Committee reports

 

9.  Special Committee reports

 

10.  Auditor’s report (spring only)

 

11.  Other business

 

Responsibilities of Governing Board Members

 

The Governing Board agenda is characteristically long and substantive and successful completion of the meeting requires the conscientious effort of each member.  Committee members have a dual responsibility of representing their constituents (i.e., the Chapter, Division, or Section members that elected them) and representing the Society as a whole.  This is a sensitive role that requires a long-term image of what AFS and the fisheries profession can and should be.  The importance of this group and each member, voting and nonvoting, cannot be overemphasized. In 2013, a motion was approved to delegate additional authority to the Management Committee to facilitate the Governing Board’s ability to focus on issues involving strategic planning, accountability, and the President’s plan of work. Even with this delegated authority, the Management Committee would continue to report to the Governing Board on all decisions; however, the Governing Board, with majority approval, would retain the ability to discuss any of these decisions.

 

Each member of the Governing Board (other than Chapter Presidents) has the following specific responsibilities:

 

1.  Attend the two fall meetings (second meeting being the Incoming Governing Board Meeting immediately following Annual Business Meeting) and the spring meeting of the committee, without financial compensation from AFS.

 

2.  If attendance is impossible, appoint an alternate.  The alternate must be appointed as stated in Article IV, paragraph 1.C of the Constitution.

 

3.  Read the agenda and accompanying documents thoroughly before arriving at the meeting, noting areas of special interest for discussion.

 

4.  If appropriate, prepare a report of the unit represented according to the guidelines described elsewhere in these Procedures and orally summarize the report at the meeting.

 

5.  Confer with unit officers, Governing Board, and members to determine their opinions regarding agenda items so that discussion and voting will be as representative of the membership as possible.

 

6.  Submit additional agenda items to the AFS President and Executive Director before or as soon as the call for reports is received.  All suggested agenda items must be accompanied by background materials and be prepared approximately in the form described elsewhere in the Procedures.

 

7.  At the Governing Board meeting, assure that all important information concerning an agenda item is heard, but that redundancy is eliminated.  It is counterproductive for each person to speak on each item or for any item to be acted on without full discussion.

 

8.  Review  R obert’s  R ule s  o f Order, which is the basis for Governing Board operation. Expect to be ruled out-of-order for failing to follow these rules.

 

9.  Recognize that a motion and second are needed before a topic can be discussed. Extended exploratory discussions are not permissible and, more importantly, are not practical as part of an extensive agenda.

 

10.  Remain attentive while the Committee is in session.  Expect to be reprimanded by the chair for disruptive or discourteous behavior.

 

11.  Report the results of Governing Board actions to the unit’s members and especially

to those persons (e.g., committee chairs) directly affected by those actions.

 

 

Management Committee

 

The Management Committee functions as an Executive Committee of the Governing Board, monitoring society activities to ensure that policies and plans approved by the Governing Board are implemented appropriately and guiding the Executive Director in these endeavors.  The Management Committee reviews the Executive Director’s proposed budget and makes recommendations for Governing Board approval. Beginning in 2013, the Management Committee has the authority to decide routine issues without seeking Governing Board approval. The Management Committee reports to the Governing Board on all decisions; however, the Governing Board, with majority approval, retains the ability to discuss any of these decisions.

 

The Management Committee comprises the following:

 

  • AFS President (chair), President-elect, First Vice-President, Second Vice-President, and

Immediate Past-president.

 

  • The presidents of two Divisions and presidents-elect of the two alternative Divisions.

The presidents-elect remain on the Committee through their presidential year, usually attending four Management Committee meetings before rotating off the committee.  In the event an appointed Division officer moves from president-elect to president during the course of the year, the officer will retain her/his appointment to the Management Committee.  This ensures continuity of membership on the committee.  Typically, the

presidents-elect of the Southern Division and Northeast Division begin their service at the

Mid-Year meeting of odd-numbered years, while the presidents-elect of the Western and North Central Divisions begin their service in even-numbered years.

 

  • Four Division or Section members on the Governing Board (voting or not) elected at large by the Governing Board as voting members of the Management Committee; and

 

  • Executive Director, Constitutional Consultant and such others as the AFS President may appoint (nonvoting on the Governing Board and Management Committee).

In the event of unforeseen circumstances, voting members of the Management Committee may designate proxies for participation at the mid-year and annual meetings of the Management Committee.  Such proxies must be designated in writing 15 days prior to the meeting and provided to the Executive Director and President.

 

Responsibilities of Management Committee Members

 

While the Division representatives serve as a function of their office, appointees from sections are elected to this committee with the confidence of their colleagues on the Governing Board. As such, they are selected as individuals and are not automatically replaced by their successor if section officers change during the year. Appointees from sections have full voting privileges on Management Committee affairs, whether or not their section has a vote on the Governing Board.

 

The Management Committee communicates monthly via conference calls (as needed) at a time determined by the AFS President (e.g., the third Tuesday of the month, 1:00 pm Eastern Time) to discuss issues and through email as necessary. The AFS President will confirm scheduling of the calls (or cancel as appropriate), and establish call agendas.  Members of the Management Committee should submit agenda items no later than 10 days before a scheduled call.  Agendas should be provided by the AFS President to the Management Committee no later than one week prior to the call.  Agendas and subsequent discussion will focus on AFS policies and plans, particularly those with budgetary implications.  Management Committee members meet to conduct business during the mid-year meeting, typically held in early March, and at the annual meeting of the Society.  These meetings are generally held on the Thursday afternoon before the Governing Board retreat (Friday) and the Governing Board meeting (Saturday).  In the absence

of a Governing Board retreat, the Committee meets on Friday afternoon. The minutes from all

Management Committee meetings will be shared with the Governing Board.

 

During the mid-year and annual meetings, the Management Committee reviews the Executive Director’s proposed budget, approves routine motions, and makes recommendations for Governing Board approval when appropriate.  The budget review includes such things as: detailed consideration of the Executive Director’s proposed changes to dues, fees, and other charges for AFS services; recommendations to the Governing Board on any proposals with financial implications; a review of the status of the Reserve Fund; and guidance on the funding of New Initiatives.

 

The Management Committee, together with the Executive Director and the AFS Investment Committee, are responsible for ensuring the implementation of policy and guidelines in the Statement of Investment Policy and Objectives, which governs the management of AFS’ Long- Term Investments.  The Management Committee may recommend modification of the objectives and policies of this Statement and, if necessary, seek approval by the Governing Board.

 

When AFS units request seed money to support unit meetings, the Management Committee is authorized to approve up to $10,000 for such requests (seed money is to be returned to AFS from the revenue of the meeting).

 

The Management Committee also reviews and recommends the President Elect’s Plan of Work

for approval by the Governing Board.

 

Conflict of Interest Policy and Procedures

 

 

The purpose of the following policy and procedures is to prevent the personal interests of the American Fisheries Society (AFS) officers, board members, or staff from interfering with the performance of their duties in AFS, or resulting in personal financial, professional, or political gain on the part of such persons at the expense of AFS or its members, supporters, and other stakeholders.

 

Definitions

 

1.  Conflict of Interest (also Conflict) means a conflict, or the perception or appearance of a conflict, between the personal private interests and official responsibilities of a person in a position of trust.  Persons in a position of trust include staff members, officers, and board members of AFS.

 

2.   Board means the AFS Governing Board.

 

3.   Officer means an elected or appointed officer of AFS.

 

4.   Staff Member or Employee (including adjunct staff) means a person who receives all or part of her/his income from payments made by AFS.

 

Policy

 

It is the policy of AFS that the Board, officers and employees are expected to avoid any actual or apparent conflict between their own personal interests and the interests of the Society. A conflict of interest can arise when a director, officer, or employee participates in decisions, takes actions, or has personal interests that may interfere with his or her objective and effective performance of work for the organization. For example, directors, officers and employees are expected to avoid actual or apparent conflict in dealings with members, suppliers, customers, competitors, government agencies, and other third parties.

 

Procedures

 

1.   Full  disclosure,  by  notice  in  writing,  shall  be  made  by  the  interested  parties  to  the Management Committee of the Board in all cases where conflicts of interest may exist, including but not limited to the following:

 

a.   An officer or board member is related to another officer, board member or staff member by blood, marriage or domestic partnership.

b.   A staff member in a supervisory capacity is related to another staff member whom she/he supervises.

c.   A board member, an organization in which the board member has an interest, or a staff member of such organization, stands to benefit from an AFS-related transaction or receives payment from AFS for any subcontract for goods or services other than as part

 

of  her/his  regular  job  responsibilities  or  as  reimbursement  for  reasonable  expenses incurred as provided in the bylaws and board policy.

 

2.   Following full disclosure of a possible conflict of interest or of any condition listed in item 1 above, the AFS Management Committee shall determine whether a conflict of interest exists and, if so, the Board shall vote to authorize or reject the transaction or take any other action deemed necessary to address the conflict and protect the best interests of AFS.  Both votes shall be by a majority vote without counting the vote of any interested director, even if the disinterested directors are less than a quorum, provided that at least one consenting director is disinterested. Any actions taken shall be reflected in the official minutes of the Management Committee and Board.

 

3.   A Board member who is formally considering employment with AFS must take a temporary leave of absence from the Board until the position is filled.  [This procedure also applies in the case of a relative of a Board member by blood, marriage or domestic partnership seeking employment with AFS.]  Such a leave will be taken within the Board member’s elected term, which will not be extended because of the leave.   A Board member who is formally considering employment with AFS [or is related to an individual seeking employment] must submit a written request for a temporary leave of absence to the Executive Director of AFS, c/o the AFS headquarters office, indicating the time period of the leave.  The Executive Director will inform the AFS President of such a request.   The President will bring the request to the Management Committee for action.  The request, and any actions taken, shall be reflected in the official minutes of the Management Committee and Board.

 

4.   An interested Board member, officer, or staff member shall not participate in any discussion or debate of the Management Committee or Governing Board, or of any committee or subcommittee  thereof,  in  which  the  subject  of  discussion  is  a  contract,  transaction,  or situation in which there may be a perceived or actual conflict of interest.  However, they may be present to provide clarifying information in such a discussion or debate unless objected to by any present Board or committee member.

 

5.   Anyone in a position to make decisions about spending AFS resources (i.e., transactions such as purchases or contracts) – who also stands to benefit from that decision – has a duty to disclose that conflict as soon as it arises (or becomes apparent); s/he should not participate in any final decisions on the action.

 

6.   A copy of this policy shall be given to all Board members and staff members upon its adoption  and/or  upon  commencement  of  such  person’s  relationship  with  AFS  or  at  the official adoption of stated policy.  Each Board member, officer and staff member shall sign and date the Conflict of Interest Disclosure Form upon its promulgation and/or at the beginning of her/his term of service or employment, and once each year thereafter.  Failure to sign does not nullify the policy.

 

This policy and disclosure form must be filed annually by all specified parties.

 

Document based on materials provided by the National Council of Nonprofit Associations

 

 

Conflict of Interest – Disclosure Form

 

 

This form must be filed annually by all specified parties as identified in the above AFS Conflict of Interest Policy Statement (approved by the AFS Governing Board on DATE).  Please complete the shaded blocks below, print and sign the form, and return it to AFS headquarters as indicated below.

 

I have no conflict of interest to report

 

I have the following conflict of interest to report (please specify-form box will expand as necessary):

 

 

 

 

 

 

By affixing my signature, I certify my understanding of the implications of this policy.

 

 

 

Signature

 

 

 

Full Name

 

 

 

Date

 

 

 

 

 

Completed form to be returned to AFS headquarters at:

 

AFS

Attn:  Denise Spencer

5410 Grosvenor Lane, Suite 110

Bethesda, MD 20814

 

Or Fax to: 301-897-8096

 

 

 

Document based on materials provided by the National Council of Nonprofit Associations

 

Governance Travel Committee

Purpose:

The need for this AFS Special Committee was realized during the 2007 mid-year meeting of the AFS Governing Board in Atlanta.  The purpose of the committee is to invest in the professional development of Governing Board members by providing funding to assist in travel to the mid-year meeting.  The Governing Board approved a $20,000 budget item in

2008 for this endeavor; in addition, the Governing Board stipulated that an applicant’s unit or employer must provide some level of matching funds.  A 50% match is not necessary; a modest amount of matching funds is acceptable.  It was recognized by the GB that travel for some individuals to the mid-year meeting is a problem.  Many agencies view this meeting as strictly AFS business and not necessarily of benefit to their organization.  Further, many smaller Sections also lack resources to support travel for their President to attend the Mid- year meeting.

 

Composition:

 

Chair and two members appointed by the AFS President in three-year rotating terms with one member replaced each year. The three members include the past president of a division, a large section, and a small section.

 

Duties:

 

The Governance Travel Committee is charged with development of a set of criteria, soliciting applications from Governing Board members, reviewing and evaluating applications, and providing a list of travel award recipients to the President and Executive Director.  The committee’s work should be completed annually by 14 January.

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

Selection Criteria

 

Governing Board members or duly designated proxies from Divisions (8 members) and Sections (22 members), including the President of the Student Subsection may apply for a grant.

 

Priority will be given to Units most in need as described in their submission for a travel grant.  Smaller Units with limited fiscal resources will have the highest priority with Divisions having the lowest priority.

 

If successful grant submissions exceed the budget, all requests will be pro-rated. Application Submission Process

A statement of need should be included with each grant submission indicating that full reimbursement cannot be provided by employer or unit.

 

Itemized budget should be submitted with the travel grant request, using best estimate of travel expenses.

 

A commitment for some travel support (minimum 10%) by individual, unit, or employer should be explicitly stated.

 

Timelines

 

Call for applications will be sent to Governing Board members by mid-November and request for travel grants need to be received by the Chair before January 1 via email. Individuals selected to receive travel grants will be notified by January 14.

 

Actual costs for reimbursements will be submitted to AFS Director no later than 30 days after the meeting including all necessary receipts as listed in the travel rules.

 

Rules for claiming reimbursement

1.   Unless otherwise stated meal, hotel, and mileage reimbursement rates will generally follow those outlined for federally-reimbursed (USA) travel policy.

 

2.   Itemized receipts (copies acceptable) shall be required for all expenses other than mileage and meals reimbursed under the federal per diem guidelines. Departure and return times must be listed on your expense voucher.

 

3.   Meal receipts will not be required for claims made under these rates. Rates for travel days (first and last day) are typically ¾ of the maximum rate for that location.

 

4.   Phone charges while on travel will be reimbursed and should be primarily for business purposes.  Recognizing that overnight travel for the benefit of business requires time away from family; reasonable charges to your residence will be allowed but should be limited.

 

5.   Expenses must be itemized and broken down by date, with stated purpose of travel.

 

6.   Unless permission is received ahead of time, all air travel shall be at the lowest possible rate that can be obtained on the carrier of choice.  Generally, this will mean

at coach/economy class rates.  Ticket change fees imposed by commercial carriers are an allowable expense if they are necessary.  Intention is for travel grants to be

awarded and people to be notified by mid-January so affordable airfare can be obtained.

 

7.   Mileage for use of personal vehicle will be paid at the prevailing federal rate. Starting location and ending destination must be listed for each day, along with total miles traveled.

 

8.   Miscellaneous expenses should be documented and accompanied by receipt and must be for business purposes to be eligible for reimbursement.

 

9.   For those traveling from a different country please use a web based currency exchange tool to calculate rates such as:  http://www.xe.com/ucc/.

 

10. AFS reserves the right to deny reimbursement for any expenses in excess of the limits established in this policy or for claims made without proper documentation.

 

Guidelines for Preparation of Reports to the Governing Board

 

Units provide reports to the Governing Board twice each year, during the Mid-Year Meeting which is generally held in March and at the AFS Annual Meeting which is generally held in August or September.  Most committees and units will not have completed their work before the Mid-Year Meeting and may not have action items to present.  However, it is very helpful for the Board to have progress reports from all units and plans for the balance of the year.  Each Division, Section, and Committee should submit a progress report to the Governing Board.

 

These reports comprise the briefing book, which will be sent electronically and will be available on our web site a few weeks before the meeting to allow participants to review the reports and come to the meeting prepared for discussion.  To meet this posting schedule, the Society office will need to have all reports several weeks before the meeting.  The specific deadlines for each meeting will be provided at least 2 months in advance.

 

Use the format below, which will aid in distinguishing motions with policy and/or financial implications from general activity reports and suggestions for consideration by AFS Staff, Executive Director, Officers, or other Governing Board members.  This format will also assist us in referencing the activities of all committees and units within the structure of the AFS Strategic Plan.  The Governing Board should be taking action on issues with policy and/or financial implications.  Issues of procedure or day-to-day operations of the Society are handled through other mechanisms.

 

Please limit each motion report to a maximum of 2 pages.  Each “motion” report should state clearly what the motion is (the policy or financial action to be taken by AFS), and provide the justification and background for the motion.  The specific statement of the motion must be succinct, and indicate clearly what policy or budget action AFS is being asked to undertake.  If it is a complicated issue, or one resulting from a lengthier report, please provide the background report as a separate appendix file.

 

Motion reports should address an important policy or budget decision that your unit wants the Society to approve.  Include as motions only items that require a vote by the Governing Board (e.g., items with financial implications, issues of policy for the Society).  Do not include as motions “recommendations” for consideration by the Management Committee, requests for additional information, or general encouragement to other units or individuals to participate in a particular activity.  These belong in the separate “activity” report noted in item #4 below.

 

For activity reports, or reports with suggestions or recommendations for further consideration (but no formal motions), please limit your report to no more than 5 pages.  If you feel additional information is needed, please provide a separate appendix file.

 

For a motion to be considered, it must be received by the due date (see section entitled Reports to the Governing Board) and a representative of the unit must be present to make the motion and answer questions about it.  This requirement is necessary to insure informed decision making by the Board.  If no one from your committee or unit will be present, please arrange an alternate in advance, and ensure your alternate is well-informed about the issue.

 

The final item of the semi-annual report to the Governing Board is a reminder to all unit officers to provide an annual summary financial report.  This will not be copied and distributed to the Governing Board, but will be reviewed and filed by the Society’s Director of Administration and

 

Finance.  This item is very important for our overall Society auditing and tax status. Please be sure to send in your financial report.

 

Format for Governing Board Reports

 

(please include all sections – note “nothing to report” if a section is intentionally blank)

 

 

 

TO:  AFS President

 

FROM:  Unit President or Committee Chair Name, Name of Unit

 

DATE:  date submitted

 

 

 

I. Motion Report –  (2 pages max)

 

 

(A) Recommended Motion: (State clearly and succinctly the specific action/decision you wish

AFS to make.)

 

(B) Minority View: (Describe briefly any dissenting views against the motion from within your unit.)

 

(C) Background for Motion: (Explain why the motion is needed-what problem is to be solved, or opportunity to be pursued.  Why is this important for AFS?)

 

 

 

II  Activity Report (5 pages max)

 

 

(A) Charge or Annual Program of Work:

 

 

 

(B) Summary of Outcomes and Accomplishments Organized by Focus Area in Strategic Plan with the appropriate Goal, Strategy, and Target (as possible) referenced from the AFS Strategic Plan, 2005-2009 (www.fisheries.org).  Please try to be as specific as possible but we understand it may be difficult to characterize your unit activities beyond the Focus Areas and Goals listed in the AFS Strategic Plan, but doing so will greatly facilitate Society efforts to monitor progress toward the Plan’s targets.  Focus Areas include:

 

Information Transfer and Outreach

 

Membership Services

 

Aquatic Stewardship

 

 

 

(C) Recommendations or Suggestions for Future Consideration:  Include briefly any suggestions you have for other individuals or units within AFS to respond to your unit’s activities, to provide additional information that your unit needs, to consider future activities that AFS might engage in, or challenge other units to take on certain initiatives.

 

 

 

III. Financial Status (provided only to Society Financial Officer and will not be copied and distributed in the briefing book)

 

This information is needed by the Director of Administration and Finance to confirm the Society’s non-profit status.  Please provide a copy of your Unit annual financial report for the past fiscal year.  This section will not be distributed, but will be reviewed and filed by the AFS Director of Administration and Finance.

 

Example Midyear Report to the Governing Board

 

 

 

To:  Ira Adelman, AFS President

 

From: Steve Rideout, President, Fisheries Management Section

 

Date: February 15, 2003

 

I. Motion Report:

 

(A) Recommended Motion: Move that the American Fisheries Society support the intent of the Sustainable Forestry Initiative, and suggest that the Initiative could be strengthened by a) electing an American Fisheries Society member to the SFI External Review Panel; b) seeking active AFS participation in on-the-ground certification reviews; and c) improving SFI riparian and road standards.

 

(B) Minority View: Not Applicable

 

(C) Background for Motion: See the attachment to this report, a memo from Section member Tom McMahon to Steve Rideout, Section President. We encourage the Governing Board to approve a motion to endorse the intent of the Sustainable Forestry Initiative and specifically seek to have an AFS member elected to the External Review Panel and develop a process, through the Fisheries Management Section and Divisions/Chapters, to participate in “on-the-ground” certification reviews, and propose improvements in SFI’s riparian and road standards. We suggest that AFS support may be shown appropriately by writing a letter to the AFS President (or appropriate officer or director) of the American Forest and Paper Association and/or other organizations overseeing the Sustainable Forestry Initiative.

 

II. Activity Report

 

(A) Charge or Annual Program of Work:  No specific charge or program of work defined.

 

(B) Summary of Outcomes and Accomplishments Organized by Focus Area in Strategic Plan with the appropriate goals, strategies, targets referenced.

 

Information Transfer and Outreach

 

Goal 3.1.  We have contributed to the 4th World Fisheries Congress (see additional info below).

 

Goal 3.1. We are introducing a Request for Funding process through our Section’s Web Site thanks to the efforts of Fred Janssen, with great input from President-Elect Dave Willis, Past President Tim Hess and Secretary-Treasurer Dirk Miller. This will provide a common

format and vehicle for receiving requests and prevent the sometimes last-minute crush that comes during our Annual Business Meeting.

 

Membership Services

 

Goal 2.2. Past President Tim Hess is taking the lead on developing a symposium entitled “Utilizing the New State Wildlife Grants and Landowner Incentive Program(s) to Improve Habitat for Fish and Other Aquatic Species in Decline.”

 

Goal 1.3. Section members voted to support the travel costs for an international member of the Section to attend the 4th World Fisheries Congress.  Section Past-President Tim Hess oversaw the successful application of FMS Section Member Robert Arlinghaus from Germany to be

sponsored at the 4th World Fisheries Congress this May by support of his travel. This was in

addition to the Section’s contribution of $2,500 to the WFC.

 

Aquatic Stewardship

 

Goal 1.1. The Section was asked to review the Sustainable Forestry Initiative of the American Forest and Paper Association (ASPA).  Section Member Tom McMahon (Montana Chapter) led the review and provided an analysis for AFS consideration (see attachment).  Aspects of his recommendations have been incorporated into a proposed Motion as provided in the beginning of this report.

 

Goals 1.4, 3.3, and ITO Goal 2.3. In March, our Section will once again be a sponsor of the International Salmonid Habitat Enhancement Workshop (15th this year).  Section Past-President Don Duff will be actively involved in the Workshop to be held in March in Salt Lake City following the Annual Meeting of the Western Division – AFS.

 

(C) Recommendations or Suggestions for Future Consideration: The Section challenges other AFS Units to contribute financial support to the World Fisheries Congress.

 

III. Financial Status (provided only to Society Financial Officer and will not be copied and distributed in the briefing book): To be provided to the AFS Director of Administration and Finance by the Unit Treasurer.

 

Procedures for Electronic Voting

 

A. Purpose

 

Provides for electronic voting on issues by the AFS membership and the Governing Board to allow broader participation by the membership and more-timely decision-making by the Governing Board.

 

B. Background

 

Although meetings rotate around the continent and meeting registration fees are kept as low as possible, the cost to attend the Society business meeting at the annual conference is high for a large segment of the membership.  This is a deterrent to regular participation at annual meetings by many AFS members. Typical attendance at a Society business meeting ranges from 300-500 members, which is less than 5 percent of the total membership.

 

Limited attendance can likewise affect the discussion and passage of items voted on at annual meetings, where the proportion of the membership in attendance is small and may be geographically biased.  Further, encouraging international growth and involvement in the Society requires adapting functions to accommodate such members’ participation at more levels.

 

For these reasons, decision-making on important issues such as constitutional or rule amendments, acceptance of resolutions or resource policy statements, election of officers, and other substantial issues may be conducted electronically to allow the largest

possible participation by the AFS membership.

 

While electronic voting by the entire AFS membership allows for greater participation in Society decisions, electronic voting by the Governing Board facilitates the Board’s ability to make important decisions more frequently than at semi-annual meetings and allows decisions on routine matters to be handled outside of the semi-annual meetings thus reducing time needed for those meetings.

 

Any issue that requires a vote of the AFS membership or the Governing Board may be conducted electronically. However, careful consideration should be given to electronic votes on issues that are anticipated to be controversial because in-person discussion may be needed to resolve controversies.

 

Except for referenda brought forward by petition of AFS members (AFS Constitution, Article VI.6.A), all proposals requiring a vote of the AFS membership must first be approved by the Governing Board. Therefore the electronic voting processes described below are separated into procedures for electronic voting by the AFS membership and procedures for electronic voting by the Governing Board.

 

C. Electronic voting processes

 

1. Electronic voting by the entire AFS Membership

a. Approval to submit an issue for electronic voting

 

When the Governing Board approves a motion that needs subsequent approval by the AFS membership, the AFS President (presiding officer) will seek a second motion to submit the previously passed motion to an electronic vote by the AFS membership. If the second motion carries, then the first motion will be presented

 

to the AFS membership for an electronic vote by the procedure described in Section C.1.b. (below). If the motion for an electronic vote fails, then the first motion must be presented to the membership at the subsequent Annual Business Meeting with notification as specified in the AFS Constitution.

 

b. Presentation for review and comment

 

The Vote Auditor oversees the electronic voting process, whether it is facilitated by AFS information technology staff or by external service providers.

 

Notice is provided to members via the AFS list serve with a copy of the Governing Board approved motion, proposal, or amendment posted to the AFS Forum, at a minimum, along with a time limit for initial comment following the process outlined for that type of issue (e.g., at least 30 days advance notice for constitutional amendments). The proposal and notice may also be provided in Fisheries, if warranted.

 

c. Amended proposals

 

At the close of the comment period, if dialogue is substantial, the Governing Board, at the direction of the AFS President, reconsiders the proposal, adopts appropriate amendments, and presents the amended motion as described in Section C.1.b. As long as, in the judgment of the Governing Board, new information is emerging from the discussions, the proposal will be restated with a new time limit for response.

 

d. Call the question for voting

 

When in the judgment of the AFS President further discussion on the issue is not meaningful, the proposal is put forward for electronic voting with a 30-day deadline set for casting a vote. The wording of the final motion and deadline for voting must be announced electronically to the membership and on the AFS website, at a minimum.

 

The vote will be conducted as one member, one vote with no proxy voting allowed. AFS headquarters will confirm active member status of each voter. Appropriate mechanisms must be used to assure voter confidentiality. Provision will be made for paper ballots to be mailed at the request of any member.

 

e. Requirements

 

For an electronic vote to be conclusive, the number of votes cast must meet the quorum and the percentage approval required for that type of issue (e.g., 50 active members required to conduct Society business and 2/3 majority for constitutional amendments).

 

f. Voting options

 

The electronic voting options are: Yes/No/Abstention/Reopen Discussion. The Reopen Discussion option is to be selected if the voter determines that the issue has not been vetted to their satisfaction and therefore wishes to reopen discussion.

 

g. Results of a Reopen Discussion

 

If the majority of votes are cast for a Reopen Discussion, the electronic vote is cancelled and the process reverts to the discussion stage or is referred to an in- person meeting at the discretion of the AFS President.

 

h. Conditions for a vote of approval

 

A motion is approved if the majority of the voters give a positive vote (“Yes”). For decisions where a larger majority is required by Society bylaws, that rule will prevail.

 

i. Declaration of the outcome

 

The Vote Auditor determines the outcome of an electronic vote and communicates the result to the AFS President.

 

The AFS President confirms the result and conveys the final motion and result to the Executive Director for recording in the relevant minutes of a subsequent meeting, such as the next mid-year Governing Board or Society Business Meeting. (The electronic vote would be conducted instead of voting at the meeting, not in addition to voting in person.)

 

The final motion or action shall be stated and results of all votes shall be published in the next available issue of Fisheries and on the AFS website.

 

2. Electronic Voting by the Governing Board

a. Approval to submit an issue for electronic voting

 

Proposals requiring a vote of the Governing Board generally arise from the semi- annual reports of units and committees that are presented in the briefing book prior to the mid-year and annual meetings of the Governing Board. Those proposals are typically resolved in those two meetings. However, the Management Committee has periodic conference calls throughout the year and proposals needing Governing Board approval occasionally arise during those calls. With management committee approval, the presiding officer (AFS president) will inform the Governing Board electronically of an upcoming vote.

 

b. Presentation for review and comment

 

The AFS President oversees the electronic voting process. Notice is provided to Governing Board members via email with a copy of the proposal posted to the AFS Forum along with a 2-week time limit for initial comment.

 

c. Amended proposals

 

At the close of the comment period, if dialogue is substantial, the Governing Board, at the direction of the AFS President, reconsiders the proposal, proposes appropriate amendments, and re-posts the item for continuing discussion for another 2 weeks. At the end of this second 2-week discussion period, if dialogue is still substantial and resolution does not seem close, the AFS President should seek a privileged motion to postpone the issue to the next mid-year or annual meeting. If the motion to postpone fails, then the question on the main motion should be called and the vote tallied.

 

d. Call the question for voting

 

When it is the judgment of the AFS President that further discussion on the issue is not meaningful, the question is called for electronic voting with a 2-week deadline set for casting a vote. The wording of the final motion and deadline for voting must be announced electronically to the Governing Board.

 

e. Requirements

 

For an electronic vote to be conclusive, the number of votes received must meet the quorum and percentage approval required for that type of issue (e.g., 50% of Governing Board members plus one casting a vote and 3/4 majority for constitutional amendments),

 

f. Voting options

 

The electronic voting options are: Yes/No/Abstention/Reopen Discussion. The Reopen Discussion option is to be selected if the voter determines that the issue has not been vetted to their satisfaction and therefore wishes to reopen discussion.

 

g. Results of a Reopen Discussion

 

If the majority of votes are cast for a Reopen Discussion, the electronic vote is cancelled and the process reverts to the discussion stage or is referred to an in- person meeting at the discretion of the AFS President.

 

h. Conditions for a vote of approval

 

A motion is approved if the majority of the voters give a positive vote (“Yes”). For decisions where a larger majority is required by the AFS Constitution, that rule will prevail.

 

i. Declaration of the outcome

 

The AFS President determines the outcome of an electronic vote (closure, reopening discussion or referral to an in-person meeting) and communicates the result to the Governing Board members. The Executive Director directs the recording of the outcome of the vote in the relevant minutes of a subsequent meeting, such as the next mid-year Governing Board meeting. If a subsequent AFS membership vote is required for the proposal to become effective, that vote may be obtained at the next AFS Annual Meeting or by electronic vote of the membership as per the procedures described above.

 

DIVISIONS

 

 

Divisions are the major geographically defined units of the Society (Figure 2, page 8).  Each North American member of AFS is automatically a member of one Division, as described in the AFS Bylaws.  Division boundaries follow existing political boundaries of states, provinces, or territories and are specifically defined in the AFS Rules.

 

Divisions represent an important level of participation for many AFS members because the Divisions carry out many of the activities of the Society, but are oriented more closely to the area within each Division’s boundary. Divisions often serve as training grounds for members interested in Society activities.  Several of the Society Committees, for example, have Division representation.

 

Purposes

 

The general purposes and responsibilities of Divisions are as follows:

 

1.   Facilitate communication among members (by newsletters and other means) regarding the conduct of the fisheries profession within the Division’s geographic region.

 

2.   Sponsor and perform a wide range of technical activities that advance the status and performance of the fisheries profession in the geographic region, including holding technical meetings and symposia, publishing technical reports and proceedings, conducting technical reviews, and performing Division-wide research and managerial studies.

 

3.   Determine the views of Division members in a variety of ways, including conducting surveys, considering resolutions, commissioning formal and informal studies, and producing position papers.

 

4.   Present the views of Division members to the AFS membership, the profession, the general public, and government decision-makers.

 

5.   Hold annual meetings at which all Bylaw responsibilities are carried out.

 

6.   Participate in the governing of the Society via voting membership on the Governing

Board and serving on other Society Committees.

 

7.   Promote the fisheries profession within the Division’s boundaries through active and positive relations with journalists, government officials, special interest groups, other professional organizations, and the general public.

 

8.   Promote proper use of aquatic resources by initiating and participating in special projects that increase public awareness, expand participation, improve habitat, and protect fragile resources.

 

Officers and Duties

 

Division officers are important to AFS because of their role in both Society and Division functions.  These positions are especially demanding of time and creativity.  Division officers must have intense interest in, and knowledge of, regional issues; at the same time, regional

 

interests must be balanced against national and international interests when Division officers act on behalf of the Society.

 

Each Division is required to have a minimum of a President, a President-Elect, and a Secretary/Treasurer or a Secretary and a Treasurer.  Each officer has specific duties assigned by the Division’s Bylaws.  In addition, Division officers have the following duties for the Society:

 

President:

 

1.   Serves as a voting member of the Society Governing Board, attending the three meetings per year, and performing all duties as described in the Governing Board Chapter of these procedures.

 

2.   Serves as a voting member of the Management Committee in year appointed by the

Society President.

 

3.   Serves as a voting member of the Certification Board of Appeals (if qualified as a

Certified Fisheries Professional).

 

4.   Prepares mid-year and annual reports of the Division’s activities for presentation at the mid-year and annual Governing Board meetings, including Chapter activities within the Division.

 

President-Elect:

 

1.   Serves as a voting member of the Society Governing Board, attending the three meetings per year, and performing all duties as described in the Governing Board Chapter of these procedures.

 

2.   Serves as a voting member of the Management Committee in year appointed by the

Society President.

 

Secretary:

 

1.   Sends minutes of annual meeting to the AFS Executive Director within 30 days after the annual Division meeting.

 

2.   Forwards historical records of the activities, minutes, individuals, and other aspects of the Division to AFS headquarters, as requested.

 

3.   Informs the Executive Director, the Chapter Presidents within the Division, and appropriate Society staff of changes in officers, dates and locations of meetings, and other necessary information.

 

4.   Distributes copies of resolutions to the Executive Director, Society officers, other units, and appropriate individuals or agencies, as instructed in the resolution.

 

5.   Forwards any proposed Bylaw changes to the Executive Director for review by the AFS Constitutional Consultant prior to presentation of changes to the Society’s Governing Board for approval.

 

6.   Orders a Past-President’s plaque (from AFS staff) to be presented at the annual

Division meeting.

 

7.   Prepares occasional write-ups for Fisheries concerning Division activities and programs.

 

Treasurer:

 

1.   Receives, holds, invests, and disburses funds as needed for Division function as approved by Society and Division Constitution, Bylaws, Rules, and Procedures.

 

2.   Maintains financial records in standard accounting format for review by Society officers and staff as needed or required.

 

Elected Representative to Society Nominating Committee

 

1.   Serves as a voting member of the Committee, and in this capacity represents the opinions of the Division.

 

Standing Committees

 

Most Divisions define several standing committees in their Bylaws, representing the functions which are essential to organizational life.  As a minimum, the following committees are recommended:

 

1.   Executive, which oversees all Division functions and authorizes all Division activities.

 

2.   Nominating, which recommends candidates for officers and which may collect and tally ballots.

 

3.   Membership, which recruits new members for the Division and the Society and ensures continued membership of current members.  Chair of this Committee automatically serves as a voting member of the Society Membership Committee.

 

4.   Resolutions, which develops and recommends resolutions for consideration by the Division membership.  Chair of this Committee automatically serves as a voting member of the Society Resolutions Committee.

 

SECTIONS

 

 

Sections are units of the Society defined by professional interests and are intended to advance the Society’s objectives within the various disciplines of fisheries science and practice.  Sections share the general purposes of the Society, but restrict their activities to their specified interest area.  A Section may also create smaller organizational units within it to serve its purposes, but these units shall not act without Section approval.  Sections have no geographic boundaries.

 

Sections are formed when a group of AFS members decides that sufficient interest exists in a particular fishery science discipline to enable a unit devoted to that topic to have long-term viability.  Sections can also be formed when personnel of a long-standing special committee take the appropriate steps.  Steps involved in Section formation and dissolution are described in the AFS Constitution printed in the AFS Membership Directory and Handbook.

 

Purposes

 

The general purposes and responsibilities of Sections are as follow:

 

1.   Facilitate communication among members (by newsletters and other means)

regarding new developments in the professional interest-area of the Section.

 

2.   Hold meetings, publish works, and perform other activities on a technical and semi- technical level that advance the status and performance of professionals with the specified interests.

 

3.   Determine the views of Section members relative to issues within the interest-area of the Section, for example, by conducting surveys, considering resolutions, and convening panels of experts.

 

4.   Present the views of Section members to the AFS membership, the profession, the public, and governmental decision-makers.

 

5.   Hold annual Section meetings at which all Bylaw responsibilities are carried out.

 

6.   Serve as technical advisors to AFS officers and staff and to government agencies on topics relating to the professional focus of the Section.

 

7.   Promote the fisheries profession and membership in AFS among interest-area professionals and through active and positive relations with journalists, government officials, special interest groups, other professional organizations, and the general public.

 

8.   Promote wise use of aquatic resources by initiating and participating in special projects that increase public awareness, expand participation, improve habitat, and protect fragile resources.

 

9.   Maintain Section membership at a level that permits comprehensive representation of the Section’s interest area (and ideally at a membership level over 50 to permit a vote on the Society’s Governing Board).

 

Officers and Duties

 

Each Section is required to have a minimum of a President, a President-Elect, and a Secretary/Treasurer or a Secretary and a Treasurer.  Each officer has specific duties assigned by the Section’s Bylaws.  In addition Section officers have the following duties for the Society:

 

President:

 

1.   Serves as a member of the Society’s Governing Board, attends the three meetings per

year, and performs all duties as described in Chapter 3.

 

2.   Serves as a voting member of the Management Committee if elected as a member at large by the Governing Board.

 

3.   Prepares mid-year and annual reports of the Section’s activities for presentation at the

mid-year and annual Executive Committee meetings.

 

President-Elect:

 

1.   Represents, as a proxy, the President if the current President is unable to attend a

Governing Board Meeting.

 

Secretary:

 

1.   Sends minutes of annual meeting to the AFS Executive Director within 30 days after the annual Section meeting.

 

2.   Forwards historical records of activities, minutes, individuals, and other aspects of the

Section to AFS headquarters, as requested.

 

3.   Informs the Executive Director and appropriate Society staff of changes in officers, dates and locations of meetings, and other necessary information.

 

4.   Distributes copies of resolutions to the Executive Director, Society officers, other units, and appropriate individuals or agencies, as instructed in the resolution.

 

5.   Forwards any proposed Bylaw changes to the Executive Director for review by the AFS Constitutional Consultant prior to presentation of changes to the Society’s Governing Board for approval.

 

6.   Orders a Past-President’s plaque (from AFS staff) to be presented at the annual

Section meeting.

 

7.   Prepares occasional write-ups for Fisheries concerning Section activities and programs.

 

Treasurer:

 

1.   Receives, holds, invests, and disburses funds as needed for Section function as approved by Society and Section Constitution, Bylaws, Rules, and Procedures.

 

2.   Maintains financial records in standard accounting format for review by Society officers and staff as needed or required.

 

Standing Committees

 

Most Sections define several standing committees in their Bylaws, representing the functions which are essential to organizational life.  As a minimum, the following committees are recommended:

 

1.   Executive, which oversees all Section functions and authorizes all Section activities.

 

2.   Nominating, which recommends candidates for officers and which may collect and tally ballots.

 

3.   Membership, which recruits new members for the Section and the Society and ensures continued membership of current members.  Must be aggressive because of the need to recruit and then retain the 50 members required for a voting membership on AFS Governing Board.

 

4.   Resolutions, which develops and recommends resolutions for consideration by the

Section membership.

 

CHAPTERS AND OTHER UNITS

 

 

Chapters are the smallest geographically defined units recognized as being operationally independent in the Constitution.  They share the purposes of the Society but are intended to advance the Society’s objectives over more localized areas than Divisions, this area being specified in their Bylaws.

 

Chapters generally provide for interaction among professionals within limited areas, such as individual states or provinces (e.g., Ohio Chapter), contiguous states or provinces (e.g., the California-Nevada Chapter), or areas united by common interest (e.g., the Potomac or Tidewater Chapters).  Chapters are technically units of Divisions; however, Chapters may form in areas not covered by existing Divisions.  Chapter boundaries may not cross Division lines, but otherwise they need not follow political boundaries.

 

Chapters may create smaller organizational units with various titles, organization, and purposes. These subsidiary units may not act without the unit’s approval.  Under the Constitution, this is the mechanism for creating groups covering even smaller geographic areas (e.g., the Palouse Unit of the Idaho Chapter and Student Subunits within state Chapters).

 

Chapters and any other smaller organizational units are formed when a group of members decides that sufficient interest exists to support a viable long-term organization.  Steps involved in Chapter formation and dissolution are described in the AFS Constitution, printed in the AFS Membership Directory and Handbook, available on the AFS web site (www.fisheries.org) or from the Constitutional Consultant.

 

Members interested in forming new Chapters or units should recognize that such groups often appear viable because of the interest of a few motivated individuals.  When these individuals relocate or become involved in other activities, a Chapter may become inactive.  The difficulty

of maintaining a viable Chapter or smaller organizational unit increases as the geographic area or topic breadth decreases.  Student Subunits, for example, may be particularly prone to instability because of the transitory nature of the membership.  Student Subunits may only be formed under the umbrella of an active Chapter.

 

Chapters and other subsidiary units may recognize affiliate members (individuals who are not members of the Society), but affiliates should be strongly encouraged to join the Society.  All officers of any unit, committee chairs, and individuals voting on unit affairs, however, must be Society members, except as indicated in the case of jointly affiliated Student Subunits.

 

Joint Student Subunits

The AFS Constitution accommodates society subunits that have joint affiliation with the AFS and at least one other professional society, such as The Wildlife Society (TWS). These subunits are typically desired at institutions where:

1)  The small number of students in a program is inadequate to support two separate units; or

2)  Students in undergraduate or interdisciplinary programs are not segregated into separate disciplines of wildlife and fisheries.

 

To avoid unnecessary duplication of officer functions, a single set of officers could provide leadership to a mixed group of student subunit members belonging to multiple professional societies, including AFS, provided that:

 

1)  The bylaws and function of the joint organization comply with all AFS requirements (e.g., the secretary sends meeting notes to the AFS Executive Director; the treasurer makes financial records available upon request);

2)  Either the President or Vice President is an AFS member (alternating, if a President- Elect automatically becomes President);

3)  The faculty advisor is a member of both societies or there are co-advisors with at least one being an AFS member;

4)  There are at least six AFS members who can serve as officers or chairs of any committees that specifically address AFS functions; and

5)  The AFS Governing Board recognizes that upon dissolution of the subunit, assets will be distributed at the discretion of the joint unit.

 

Purposes

 

The general purposes and responsibilities of Chapters are as follows:

 

1.   Facilitate communication among members (by newsletters and other means) regarding fisheries science issues and the conduct of the fisheries profession within the Chapter’s region.

 

2.   Hold meetings, publish works, and perform other activities on a technical and semi-technical level that advance the status and performance of the fisheries profession within the Chapter’s region.

 

3.   Determine the views of members relative to professional topics affecting their performance, for example, by conducting surveys and considering resolutions.

 

4.   Present the views of Chapter members to the Division membership, the AFS membership, and to the general public and government agencies within the Chapter’s boundaries.

 

5.   Hold annual meetings at which all Bylaw responsibilities are carried out.

 

6.   Serve as technical and professional advisors to government agencies within the

Chapter’s region.

 

7.   Promote the fisheries profession within the Chapter’s boundaries through active and positive relations with journalists, government officials, special interest groups, other professional organizations, and the general public.

 

8.   Promote proper use of aquatic resources by initiating and participating in special projects that increase public awareness, expand participation, improve habitat, and protect fragile resources.

 

Officers and Duties

 

Each Chapter is required to have at least a President, a President-Elect, and a Secretary/Treasurer

or a Secretary and a Treasurer.  Each officer has specific duties assigned by the Chapter’s

Bylaws. In addition, Chapter officers have the following duties for the Society:

 

President:

 

1.   Extends an invitation to the Division President to attend the annual Chapter meeting

(and any other general activities of the Chapter).

 

2.   Serves as a voting member of the Division’s Executive Committee and attends all

meetings of that Committee.

 

3.   Prepares mid-year and annual reports of the Chapter’s activities for presentation at the annual Division meeting and attends if possible.

 

4.   Serves as a nonvoting member of the Society Governing Board and attends meetings, if possible.

 

President-Elect:

 

1.   Represents, as a proxy, the President if the current President is unable to attend a

Division Executive Committee Meeting.

 

Secretary:

 

1.   Sends minutes of annual meeting to the AFS Executive Director within 30 days after the annual Chapter meeting.  Minutes and newsletters should also be sent to the Division President.

 

2.   Forwards historical records of the activities, minutes, individuals, and other aspects of the Chapter to AFS headquarters, as requested.

 

3.   Informs the Executive Director, the Division President, and appropriate Society staff of changes in officers, dates and locations of meetings, and other necessary information.

 

4.   Distributes copies of resolutions to the Executive Director, Society officers, the Division President, and appropriate individuals or agencies, as instructed in the resolution.

 

5.   Forwards any proposed Bylaw changes to the Executive Director for review by the AFS Constitutional Consultant prior to presentation of changes to the Society’s Governing Board for approval.

 

6.   Orders a Past-President’s certificate (from AFS staff) to be presented at the annual

Chapter meeting.

 

7.   Prepares occasional write-ups for Fisheries concerning Chapter activities and programs

 

Treasurer:

 

1.   Receives, holds, invests, and disburses funds as needed for Chapter function as approved by Society and Chapter Constitution, Bylaws, Rules, and Procedures.

 

2.   Maintains financial records in standard accounting format for review by Society officers and staff as needed or required.

 

Standing Committees

 

Most Chapters include a variety of standing committees in their Bylaws, representing the functions which are essential to organizational life.  As a minimum, the following committees are recommended:

 

1.   Executive, which oversees all Chapter functions and authorizes all Chapter activities.

 

2.   Nominating, which recommends candidates for officers and which may collect and tally ballots.

 

3.   Membership, which recruits new members for the Chapter and the Society and ensures continued membership of current members.

 

4.   Resolutions, which develops and recommends resolutions for consideration by the

Chapter membership.

 

STANDING AND SPECIAL COMMITTEES

 

 

Standing Committees are permanent committees established through the Society Constitution. These committees perform a variety of tasks deemed essential by the membership.  Committees carry the burden of substantive work conducted for the membership as a whole.

 

Additional Standing Committees are established through amendments to the Constitution, usually by converting a special committee that has functioned effectively for several years and the charge of which has been deemed worthy of standing-committee status.

 

The AFS President appoints and charges the chairs and members of all standing committees within 30 days after the annual Society meeting unless otherwise specified.  All appointees must be Active Members, and their terms of duty extend to the end of the next annual meeting if not stipulated otherwise.

 

Special Committees address topics that do not fall under the responsibilities of Standing Committees.  In the past, the terms “ad hoc” and “sessional”, as well as “special”, have been used by the Society to denote this type of organizational unit.  The term “Special Committee” is

now designated in the Constitution as the standard name for any group acting for the Society that is not specifically authorized in the Constitution.

 

Special Committees are formed when the AFS President or Governing Board decides that a formalized AFS action or position is needed on some issue.  Examples include internal studies of the Society or specific Society functions (e.g., long-range planning), developing issues of

national or international importance (e.g., reorganization of federal fisheries agencies), or new initiatives by the Society (e.g., fish photograph library).

 

Special Committees are established by the AFS President, with no additional authorization needed.  They exist for one year, but may be re-appointed in subsequent years at the discretion of the subsequent AFS President.  Members may include individuals who are not Active Members of the Society, particularly for Special Committees established in partnership with other professional/scientific societies or for issues on which current AFS expertise is limited.

 

Society Committees and their current chairpersons are listed in the annual AFS Membership

Directory and Handbook and on the AFS Web site.

 

The Coordinator of Unit Services on AFS staff provides support for committees and track membership on the committees.

 

Responsibilities of Committee Chairs

 

In addition to the specific responsibilities for each committee, committee chairs share a number of general responsibilities, as follows:

 

1.  Ensure that the committee charge is well understood and implemented:

 

  • Confer with the AFS President after being appointed to determine the exact charge of the committee and any unusual or specific charges for that year.  Work must begin quickly because committees generally have one year or less to perform their charges.

 

  • Confer with the outgoing chair of the committee to determine what tasks remain from the preceding year and to receive documents, supplies, and other materials necessary for committee function.

 

  • Review the Society Constitution, Rules and Procedures with special emphasis on the sections relevant to your committee.

 

2.  Committee Appointments:

 

  • Official appointments are made by the AFS President.  The Chair should work with the AFS President to develop a list of potential committee members. Potential members should be contacted to determine their ability and willingness to join the committee.  It is the responsibility of the Chair to make expectations and work load requirements clear to potential committee members.

 

  • Broad representation in committee membership is important so that the committee accurately reflects the Society’s overall viewpoint.  Geographic location, professional expertise, and employment sector are primary criteria for committee balancing.

 

  • There is benefit to maintaining institutional memory and to a fresh perspective on committee responsibilities.  The Chair should balance those by recommending a mix of new and returning members.

 

  • Some committees have very specific limitations on membership and terms of service (e.g., Certification).  It is the Chair’s responsibility to ensure that the AFS President is aware of them and makes appointments accordingly.

 

3.  Committee Leadership:

 

  • Immediately after appointment of the committee, contact all members to describe the nature of the committee’s work, the specific tasks to be completed and the associated timetables, and to solicit suggestions from members concerning the most efficient and effective way to perform those tasks.

 

  • Work with committee members to develop goals, time schedules, and responsibilities.  Be respectful of the fact that this is volunteer work and allow sufficient time to complete the tasks.
  • Maintain regular contact with committee members.  Members rely on the Chair to keep them on schedule, which means that one of the Chair’s main jobs is to keep the members working.

 

 

  • When appropriate, encourage members to confer with colleagues, both within and outside AFS, who may be interested in the committee’s charge or have experience with similar issues or activities.  Exceptions would be in cases where the committee has agreed to keep interim drafts confidential until a final draft is completed or for confidential issues (e.g., Ballot Tally, Certification, Ethics and Professional Conduct, etc.).

 

4.  Travel expenses:

 

  • Committee chairs (and the AFS President) should make it clear when recruiting committee members that travel expenses are not normally covered for AFS committee activities. If for whatever exceptional reason a committee chair decides that he/she must have the participation of a committee member at a certain committee meeting, and such participation requires travel funding, the committee chair should submit this request to the AFS President and Executive Director in writing, specifying the estimated amount and justifying the need.  If approved in writing by the Executive Director and Officers, on a case by case basis, the recipient will be notified by the committee chair.

 

5.  Committee decisions and minority opinions:

 

  • On questions requiring votes, the Chair should vote only to break ties or vote with a sealed ballot before the rest of the committee so the Chair’s vote cannot unduly alter the outcome.

 

  • In all deliberations, encourage members to express their opinions before expressing the Chair’s.  Participate in the process only as much as any other member.

 

  • Prohibit any individual member from dominating the committee’s viewpoint by actively seeking the opinions of all members (e.g., circulating drafts of one member’s long letter, asking each member to speak on each issue or asking specific questions of each member during conference calls).

 

  • Provide opportunities for committee members to include minority opinions or reports along with the main actions or recommendations of the committee.

 

6.  Reports and Record Keeping:

 

  • Submit midyear and annual reports to the AFS President, on time and in the prescribed format.

 

  • Maintain complete and orderly files of committee correspondence and action for transmission to the incoming chair where appropriate.  This should include

memos to the file describing any new procedures or modifications used during the year.

 

7.  Institutional Memory and Continuity:

 

  • Review the Society Constitution, Rules and Procedures near the end of your term as Chair.  Do those documents accurately describe Committee roles and operations?  Recommend to the AFS President any changes necessary for the efficient operation of the Committee and Society.  Make the recommendation in the form of a motion to update the appropriate document(s) so that the Governing Board will consider it at their next meeting.

 

  • At the end of your term write letters to active committee members, thanking them for their participation.

 

  • Recommend prospective committee members and chairs for the following year to the President-Elect.

 

Responsibilities of Committee Members

 

In addition to the specific responsibilities for each committee, committee members share a number of general responsibilities, as follows:

 

1.  Ensure that the committee charge is well understood and implemented:

 

  • Confer with the Chair after being appointed to determine the exact charge of the committee.  It is important that you understand your role and the expectations of the Chair.  Don’t agree to serve unless you are willing and able to complete the assignments.

 

  • Review the Society Constitution, Rules and Procedures with special emphasis on the sections relevant to your committee.

 

2.  Committee Participation:

 

  • Respond in a timely manner to all requests from the Chair.  Provide suggestions on specific committee assignments as well as the most efficient and effective way to perform those tasks.  Participate in the development of goals, time schedules, and responsibilities.

 

  • When appropriate, confer with colleagues, both within and outside AFS, who may be interested in the committee’s charge or have experience with similar issues or activities.  Exceptions would be in cases where the committee has agreed to keep interim drafts confidential until a final draft is completed or for confidential issues (e.g., Ballot Tally, Certification, Ethics and Professional Conduct, etc.).

 

  • Express your opinions openly, considering the interests of the Society and entire membership before your personal interests.

 

  • Listen to, and carefully consider, the viewpoints of other committee members.

Do not dominate committee information exchanges whether personal, telephone, electronic or written.

 

  • Review the Society Constitution, Rules and Procedures near the end of each year.

Do those documents accurately describe Committee roles and operations? Recommend to the chair any changes necessary for the efficient operation of the Committee and Society.

 

3.  Travel expenses:

 

  • Be aware that travel expenses are not normally covered for AFS committee activities. If for whatever exceptional reason a committee member and chair believe that travel funding should be provided, the committee chair should submit this request to the AFS President and Executive Director in writing, specifying the estimated amount and justifying the need.  If approved in writing by the Executive Director and Officers, on a case by case basis, the recipient will be notified by the committee chair.

 

Purposes, Composition, and Duties of Standing Committees

 

For each of the Standing Committees the following sections will be included.  The intent is to provide a complete, clear and concise documentation of why the Committee exists, who should be on the Committee, what the Committee does and, when available, how they should do it.  The idea is to enhance efficiency and consistency by providing clear guidance to future Committees.

 

Purpose:

 

This will include the committee description directly from the Constitution. If the Constitution is changed this section should be changed similarly.  It is acceptable to add additional detail regarding purpose so long as it is consistent with the Constitution.  Care should be taken not to mix duties or operational details into this section.

 

Composition:

 

Some Standing Committees have very specific requirements for membership such as the Board of Professional Certification or Board of Appeals.  Most are less specific.  In all cases care should be taken to obtain broad representation in committee membership.  This is important so that, to the extent possible, committee perspectives reflect that of the Society.  Geographic location, professional expertise, and employment sector are primary criteria for committee balancing.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

This should be a list of the specific duties for each committee.  Please list chronologically if applicable.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

These are not relevant to every committee but some have rather specific rules for operation.  These are distinguished from duties in that duties are “what you do” and operational guidelines are “how you do it”.  This distinction is not always clear but can be helpful at times.

 

 

 

Arrangements Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Makes the arrangements for all aspects of the annual Society meeting.  This includes coordinating budget and finance, collaborating with the AFS central office on registration and other administrative aspects of the meeting, collecting fees, planning

accommodations and social functions, organizing venues for oral and poster presentations, fundraising, coordinating student affairs, and generating publicity for the meeting.

 

Composition:

 

The chair is selected at least two years prior to the meeting.  A suitable candidate is ideally identified at the time the group bidding for the annual meeting makes their presentation to the AFS Time and Place Committee for consideration.  This appointment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Duties:


is made by the current AFS President, but in consultation with the Officer who will preside over the meeting being arranged.  For example, the 2nd Vice President will be AFS President in 3 years so he or she selects the person to Chair arrangements at “their” meeting.  The Chair is generally a member of the local chapter or organization hosting the Annual meeting.  This person then serves as a member of the Committee until the

year they serve as Chair.

 

The Chair coordinates and administers all aspects of the Annual Meeting.   The Committee normally has many subcommittees composed of the host jurisdiction’s professionals.

 

 

 

The Chair also serves as General Chair for the Annual Meeting (Article IX, 2. A).  In this capacity the Chair provides coordination and oversight for the other meeting committees. If disagreements arise the Chair will make the final decision in consultation with the AFS President.

 

Performs activities as described in the “Guidelines for Hosts of Annual Meetings” which

is available from AFS Headquarters.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

None specified at this time

 

 

 

Audit Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Conducts a review of the Society finances to address Congressional concerns regarding nonprofit organizations where the Executive Director is also the financial officer. Provides recommendations to the Executive Director and AFS President concerning Society financial affairs.   (Article IX.1.B.)

 

Composition:

 

At least three AFS members including two Co-Chairs.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

  • Review the financial picture and practices of the Society at the end of each year before an outside contracted firm conducts the formal audit.

 

  • Work with Society financial staff to provide feedback to the Executive Director on financial issues.

 

  • Review the audit report provided by the contracted audit firm prior to the Midyear

Governing Board meeting.

 

  • Present conclusions in a report to the Governing Board at the AFS Annual Meeting.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

None.  Additional guidelines are described in the Procedures Manual section on

“Program Planning and Financial Planning.”

 

Awards Committee

 

Purpose:

 

The Awards Committee oversees subcommittees for various Society-level awards.  Each subcommittee has specific composition and duty requirements and, in most cases, selects award recipients.

 

Composition:

 

The Awards Committee includes subcommittees for each Society-level award.  The overall Chair is the First Vice-President, and the Unit Services Coordinator serves as the Staff contact person.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

The Chair coordinates the activities of all award subcommittees, ensuring that committee appointments are made and that each committee is active and on track to complete its assignment.  Soon after the April 1 nomination deadline, the Chair should solicit names

of nominees being considered by each award subcommittee to determine if any individual or entity has been nominated for more than one award.  If so, the Chair should alert the affected committees and ask them to coordinate their activities so that the same

individual or entity will not be recognized in the same year with multiple Society awards, unless such multiple awards are deemed appropriate.

 

Duties that are common to all subcommittees are listed here.  Other duties, specific to each award, will follow under that subcommittee’s listing in the Society Awards section of the Procedures.

1.   By October of each year, the Chair of each award subcommittee sends his or her contact information to both the Unit Services Coordinator and the Chair of the Awards Committee.

2.   Nominations are due April 1 and are sought in multiple ways:

a.   Each award subcommittee solicits nominees for its respective award.

b.   The Chair of the Awards Committee encourages Units to forward their award winner nominations to the appropriate Society award committee for consideration at this higher level.

c.   The Unit Services Coordinator solicits nominations for all Society awards in the December/January issue of Fisheries; those award notices must be sent to the editor of Fisheries in October. The Unit Services Coordinator also sends at least one reminder notice prior to the April 1 nomination deadline.

3.   The Chair of each award subcommittee informs the Chair of the Awards Committee of progress in recruiting members, award nominations, and any proposed procedural changes.

4.   After the selection of an award recipient, the Chair of each award subcommittee informs the Chair of the Awards Committee, Unit Services Coordinator, Executive Director, President, and awardee (informally). Every effort will be made to notify the awardee as far in advance of the meeting as possible to facilitate travel planning. The Unit Services Coordinator will send a formal letter from the President to notify the awardee, provide logistical information about the

 

meeting, and request necessary information (e.g., photograph and phonetic spelling of name). Awardees are encouraged to share the award announcement with colleagues. Press releases, however, should not be issued until after the annual meeting.

5.   Official announcement of each award occurs at the annual meeting, either at the Plenary Session or at the Business Meeting depending on the award and discretion of the President.

6.   To facilitate presenting the award at the annual meeting, the Chair of each award subcommittee will provide the Unit Service Coordinator with 3-4 one-line bullets summarizing the awardee(s) accomplishments as well as contact information.

 

Operational Guidelines: None specified at this time

 

 

 

Board of Appeals

 

Purpose:

 

Considers appeals from fisheries professionals whose applications for original or renewed certification have been denied by the Board of Professional Certification.  Only Certified Fisheries Professionals may serve on the board.

 

Composition:

 

Society Second Vice-President and each Division President; Chair of Board Professional

Certification (nonvoting convener).

 

All members must be Certified Fisheries Professionals.  Non-certified individuals serving in the roles identified above must designate a proxy from their unit, to be appointed by

the AFS President.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

1. Convener receives appeal request forwarded from the Executive Director.

 

2.  Convener writes analysis of original decision of the Board of Certification and of the new or expanded materials presented by applicant to counter that original decision and sends copies of this and the original application with all related materials along with a ballot to each Board of Appeals member.

 

3.  After reviewing the application, all attachments, and the analysis, each Board member sends only the marked ballot to the Executive Director who transmits the resulting decision (a simple majority vote of the five members overturns the original ruling) to applicant.

 

4.  This is a confidential process; Board members may not show or discuss applications or reveal the reasons for negative decisions to anyone except other Board members, Board of Appeals members, AFS Staff involved with certification, and the applicant.

 

5.  Certification Board Chair (as Convener) passes on new or ongoing appeals to the incoming Chair.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

The BOARD OF APPEALS considers appeals from fisheries professionals whose application for certification or renewal has been denied by the Board of Professional Certification. The board will consult with the appropriate subcommittees of the Board of Professional Certification as needed.  However, if an appeal is based on a denial because of a deficiency in Professional Development Quality Points, and if the application was rejected by the office staff member without examination by the Professional

Development Subcommittee, then the Board of Appeals must seek a recommendation from that subcommittee before taking action.

 

 

 

Board of Professional Certification

 

Purpose:

 

Certifies fisheries professionals based on standards and requirements adopted by the

Governing Board. Composition:

The Board of Professional Certification comprises three subcommittees: the Education Subcommittee, the Experience Subcommittee, and the Professional Development Subcommittee.  Each subcommittee will consist of five Certified Fisheries Professionals serving staggered three-year terms, one of whom shall be appointed chair.

 

One of the subcommittee chairs will be appointed Chair of the Board of Professional

Certification. The Chair is responsible for coordination of Board activities.

 

The Education Subcommittee must have at least one member from each Division, and all members must be faculty members from colleges and universities at the time of appointment.

 

The Experience Subcommittee must have at least one member from each Division, and have at least two employees of government agencies at the time of their appointment and one from the private sector at the time of his or her appointment.

 

The Professional Development Subcommittee must have at least one member from each Division, and have at least one faculty member from a college or university, one employee from a government agency, and one from the private sector.  Members must be from those groups at the time of their appointment.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

This committee approves or rejects applications for professional certification.  It is their obligation to be fair and objective and to maintain the integrity of the process.  They should also strive to complete reviews in a timely manner.

 

Each member must become familiar with and knowledgeable about the certification guidelines as published in these procedures and on the website at http://fisheries.org/docs/cert_pcp.pdf.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

The Education Subcommittee approves or denies applications with regard to educational requirements.

 

The Experience Subcommittee approves or denies applications with regard to professional experience requirements.

 

The Professional Development Subcommittee will work with the Coordinator of Unit Services to review Professional Development requests (both for certification and renewal).

 

Applications for Certified Fisheries Professional must be approved by all three subcommittees.

 

Applications for Associate Fisheries Professional must be approved only by the

Education Subcommittee.

 

Applications to upgrade from Associate Fisheries Professional to Certified Fisheries Professional must be approved by the Experience Subcommittee and the Professional Development Subcommittee provided the Associate Fisheries Professional status has not expired.

 

Applications for Emeriti status must be approved only by the Coordinator of Unit Services.  The Experience Subcommittee should evaluate applications if there are uncertainties or disagreements with applicants.

 

Applications for Certified Fisheries Professional under the “established fishery professional” category must be approved by the Experience Subcommittee and the Professional Development Subcommittee.

 

The Board may choose to table applications which are incomplete or require additional clarification.  Applicants will be given 90 days to provide additional information in support of their applications as requested by the Board.  The application will be denied if such information is not provided.

 

The Board responds to inquiries from the Board of Appeals as appropriate.

 

The Coordinator of Unit Services is responsible for overall coordination and distribution of applications to the subcommittees.  This includes answering questions and assisting members in the preparation of their application.  This also includes initial screening of applications to verify that all information provided by the applicant meets minimum certification requirements.  Applications should be rejected which clearly do not meet requirements.  The appropriate committees should evaluate applications if there are uncertainties or disagreements with applicants.

 

This is a confidential process; Board members may not show or discuss applications or reveal the reasons for negative decisions to anyone except other Board members, Board of Appeals members, AFS Staff involved with certification, and the applicant.

 

Each round of certification reviews consists of 2 votes.  The first round is referred to as pre-decision comments.  This is where subcommittee members do the most intensive review of the applications. Each subcommittee chair compiles all comments and distributes the results.  In cases of a split vote all members should review the application again and submit their final decision.  If decisions are unanimous on the first round there is no need for a second evaluation.  Three negative or 3 positive votes are required for a final decision on each subcommittee.  It is the chair’s responsibility to make a final decision if there is an even split (2 to 2).

 

The emeriti reviews require no pre-decision comment.  Individuals who held the CFP

designation for at least twenty (20) years (need not be consecutive) and who are

employed less than full time or are retired, may request emeriti status through which they can maintain their CFP status without the renewal requirement.

 

 

 

Constitutional Consultant

 

Purpose:

 

Assists and advises the AFS President on parliamentary procedure at all meetings of the Society, Governing Board, and Management Committee.  The Constitutional Consultant reviews all proposed amendments to the Constitution and assists the Executive Director with their presentation to the members prior to a vote.  The Constitutional Consultant reviews all proposed amendments to unit bylaws and bylaws of new units for conformity with the Society’s Constitution, and presents them to the Governing Board with recommendations for approval.

 

Composition:

 

One person.  It is best to appoint someone who is familiar with Governing Board operations and willing to serve for at least 3 years. The Constitutional Consultant serves for one year as an Apprentice before being the lead parliamentarian for a minimum term of two years.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

Most duties are described above in the purpose.  The most important task is to assist and advise the AFS President and other members of the Society on parliamentary issues.  It is also the responsibility of the Constitutional Consultant to ensure that the Society Procedures are updated to reflect Governing Board actions.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

The Constitutional Consultant serves as a non-voting member of the Governing Board and Management Committee.

 

The length of service is not specified but generally should be at least 3 years.  There should be a one year apprenticeship for the incoming Constitutional Consultant.  This allows the person to become familiar with issues and learn about the job.  The Constitutional Consultant is expected to be a member of the National Association of Parliamentarians.

 

 

 

Continuing Education Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Assesses the continuing educational and training needs of the fisheries profession and works in close coordination with the Society’s Chapters, Sections, and Divisions to develop a comprehensive continuing education program.

 

Composition:

 

Chair plus any number of others, as deemed appropriate by the Chair.  Recommended membership includes a representative from each of the AFS Divisions as well as representatives from other societies, as appropriate.  The inclusion of a Co-Chair is encouraged to maintain institutional knowledge and to distribute the work load.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

Committee sets criteria and guidelines to ensure appropriate quality control of all continuing education activities sponsored by AFS.  All continuing education activities sponsored at Society-level events must be approved by the Committee.  AFS Units may request assistance from the Committee for activities conducted at other venues, which

will provide guidance as appropriate.  Requests for Continuing Education Unit credits for courses are handled by this Committee.  Committee develops a slate of courses for the annual meeting.  Develops implementing direction and agenda for items related to its charge within the AFS Strategic Plan. Committee helps facilitate communication among AFS units with interests and experience in offering continuing education courses. (See “OPERATIONAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES”, section titled “PROCEDURE

FOR SUBMITTING PROPOSED CONTINUING EDUCATION COURSES”)

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

Most activities conducted by the Committee are done electronically, mainly through email correspondence; occasionally through conference calls if necessary and/or to increase the level of coordination and consistency of the Committee.  Rarely is a person- to-person meeting necessary for the Committee to conduct its business. In addition, when needed, the Committee can vote on application deadline extensions and other relevant procedural exceptions to ensure that an appropriate suite of quality continuing education courses are available to our membership for the year.  All changes will be proposed by

the Chair, and voted on by the Committee.  Approval for outstanding requests will be granted if approved by consensus.  If a course is deemed ineligible for continuing education credits, the Committee will decide whether or not an alternative venue is available for the course (such as proposing a “general workshop” at an AFS annual meeting).

 

National Education Opportunity Procedures

 

When applicable, the Continuing Education Committee (CEC) can consider partnerships with extrinsic organizations, such as educational organizations, Universities and University Education Programs, State, Local and Federal Fisheries Education Initiatives. When such an opportunity presents itself, it is then the duty of the Chair(s) to present a summary of the request and/or information and opportunity to the CEC committee for review & approval.  If/when the CEC agrees by overwhelming majority to move forward on the consideration of such an opportunity, the Chair(s) will then contact AFS Leadership to present the opportunity, including a concise summary of the opportunities potential benefits to the organization and AFS membership, to develop a plan to move forward on consideration of the partnership with the National AFS Organization (usually through a vote by the Governing Board).  Such opportunities for extrinsic partnerships will be handled on a case-by-case basis and will always require: 1) AFS CEC Committee

 

review and approval; and 2) AFS Leadership and Governing Board review and approval, before any formal agreements and sponsorships can be handled.  In addition, once approved, it will be the responsibility of the Chair(s) to draft an agreeable MOU with the partnering organization, which will then also need to be review and approved by AFS leadership, before any formal/final agreements and signatures can be rendered.

 

 

 

Electronic Services Advisory Board

 

Purpose:

 

Periodically evaluate AFS electronic membership services to assess effective and efficient functionality, information content, ease of use, timeliness of information, attractiveness, and implementation of new media.  Additionally, the Electronic Services Advisory Board (ESAB) will provide for broad-scale representation of member interests in electronic services by facilitating quality control of online data management, media and communications and facilitate technical guidance (e.g., annual workshops on electronic services) for units, sections, chapters and individuals.

 

Composition:

 

Includes the AFS President-elect, eight other persons with staggered two-year terms and appointed AFS staff.   Each AFS President shall appoint one member each from the Publications Overview Committee, the Meetings Oversight Committee, the Education Section and the Computer Users Section.  In addition, each AFS Division President shall appoint a single representative.  Two division and one section representative shall serve staggered terms. Each AFS President shall designate a Chair from within this committee other than the AFS President-Elect.   All members of this Advisory Board are voting members with the exception of the AFS staff.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

1. Provide guidance and strategic direction for the development, use, and maintenance of the AFS member-centric database.

 

2. Provide guidance and strategic support for development of an integrated member- centric website as part of the AFS web page.

 

3.  Continually monitor the AFS Web Site to assess its attractiveness, information content, ease of use, appropriateness of linkages, and timeliness of information.  Develop policies and recommendations to provide AFS staff with guidance on the AFS Web Site and other electronic services regarding:

 

a.  Content;

 

b.  Technical issues (e.g., quality control of information technology policies and procedures);

 

c.  Ethical and professional standards (e.g., advertising, accessibility, and copyright issues);

 

d.  Outsourcing (e.g., using ISPs versus self-hosting, using contractors);

 

e.  Promotion (e.g., increasing use by membership and general public, increasing search engine hits); and,

 

f.  Education (e.g., providing technical guidance on websites, listservs, online voting and other electronic services to divisions, sections, chapters and other units).

 

4.  If the Board deems that immediate substantial changes are needed, these should be transmitted directly to the AFS President.  If the Board deems that minor corrections to the web pages are needed, these should be transmitted directly to the Executive Director and appropriate AFS staff for their attention.

 

5. Review and advise AFS President and Executive Director on new technological tools that may be available to enhance format and function of electric services of AFS membership.

 

6.  Provide a summary of assessments to the Governing Board for the midyear and annual meetings, and more frequently to the AFS President if appropriate.

 

7.  Review the 5-year Plan for the AFS Web site and draft a schedule to implement recommendations outlined in the plan that have not been previously implemented.

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

1.   ESAB will meet by conference call at least twice each year at the discretion of the

Chair.

 

2.   The ESAB will have responsibility for organization and implementation of an IT workshop held each year at the AFS Annual Meeting to discuss developments in information technology and AFS electronic member services.

 

 

 

Endangered Species Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Provides leadership for the Society on issues affecting endangered species and their ecosystems.  Committee provides technical assistance to all levels of the Society on issues concerning endangered species.

 

Composition:

 

Includes the Chair of the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists (ASIH) Conservation Committee.  Members must have specific expertise in one or more endangered taxa.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

Specific duties and projects are assigned by the AFS President in consultation with the Committee Chair, and usually relate to updating AFS lists of imperiled organisms in certain taxonomic groups for publication in an AFS outlet, or developing new lists if they do not yet exist.  Duties also include developing and updating imperiled organism databases to be available on the AFS web site.

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

None specified at this time

 

 

 

Ethics and Professional Conduct Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Responsible for educating members about the Standards of Professional conduct. Authorized body to review any cases regarding ethics forwarded by the AFS President.

 

Composition:

 

The chair will be the longest serving member of the committee.  A new member shall be appointed by the AFS President each year to serve a five year term, and shall be selected from a broad spectrum of members to include representation from private, public, and academic employment sectors.  Ex-officio member is the First Vice-president.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

The Committee shall determine any procedures for evaluation of professional conduct, with special care to maintain a balanced and fair assessment.  The Committee shall maintain confidentiality with respect to all cases and is authorized to review the facts and findings of all prior ethics cases, where such cases may provide precedent or guidance to the Committee in reaching a decision.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

The committee will review documentation, and solicit more as appropriate, regarding allegations of ethics violations.  The Committee may, but is not required to, inform the accused about the nature of the complaint.  Communication with either the complainant or the accused may be necessary to secure required information.

 

After careful deliberation, the Committee will decide whether an ethics violation has occurred, and the Committee Chair will communicate the decision to the AFS President and the Executive Director.  The AFS President will inform both the complainant and the accused regarding the outcome of the Committee decision, but is not required to reveal the name of the complainant to the accused.

 

 

 

External Affairs Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Handles matters that will enhance the visibility of the Society to the media and general public and increase the Society’s interaction with the sport fishing, aquaculture, processor, and distributor segments of the fisheries community.  In addition, the committee is to promote activism for aquatic habitat and water quality issues.                                                                                               (Article IX 2.  J)

 

Composition:

 

At least six persons with staggered three-year terms; one-third of whom are appointed by each new AFS President who designates the Chair from among the Committee.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

Committee promotes activism for aquatic habitat and water quality issues.  Develops implementing direction and agenda for elements within the AFS Strategic Plan related to its charge.

 

This committee is responsible for administering the Student Writing Award and the

Excellence in Public Outreach Award.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

Need process and criteria for the two awards.

 

It has been suggested that AFS should poll its Units at least once every two years to determine who should be added to or deleted from its media list.  This polling function would be an appropriate task for this Committee.

 

It has been suggested that this Committee could help identify and generate ideas for good stories about fish, fisheries, and AFS member activities by contacting the AFS units, then working with the AFS staff (e.g., Fisheries editor) and the Outdoor Writers Association and other entities to get these “good stories” published in general public media.

 

 

 

Liaisons

 

Purpose:

Liaisons enhance communication and cooperation between the Society and allied professional societies, councils, federations and boards.

 

Composition:

Number as determined by the AFS President, appointed to a one-year term.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

1.   Serve an important role in representing the mission, activities, policies and concerns of the Society to the boards and members of other organizations.

2.   Establish and maintain communication between the Society and the allied organizations for mutual understanding and cooperation.

3.   Communicate with AFS Officers and Unit leaders (Section presidents and Committee chairs) about relevant activities and commitments of the allied organizations.

4.   Provide a report for the annual meeting about activities that occurred between the

Society and the allied organization during their year in service.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

None specified at this time

 

Investment Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Reviews Society investments and the performance of the Investment Manager and provides recommendations to the Executive Director and AFS President concerning the Investment Manager with the overall goal of growing capital.   (Article IX 1. K)

 

Composition:

 

Three AFS members including the Chair.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

Review the portfolio performance of the Investment Manager twice a year.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

Maintain the portfolio with as diverse composition as possible to take advantage of growth.  Additional guidelines are described in these Procedures “OPERATIONAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES”, section titled “INVESTMENT OBJECTIVES AND GUIDELINES”.

 

 

 

Meeting Oversight Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Provides overall meetings review for the Society to ensure coherent planning and development of Society and Unit meetings.  (Article IX 2. L)

 

Composition:

Seven AFS members including the AFS first vice-president. If review of Topics Oriented Meetings (TOMs) becomes a considerable task, the committee chair may request the AFS president to appoint a TOMs subcommittee of an additional four members.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

The Committee will provide guidance to AFS on how to improve efforts to attain Society goals (e.g., member services, information transfer and outreach, aquatic stewardship) through Society and Unit meetings. The Committee will formulate broad AFS meeting objectives and procedures to ensure the annual meeting is a meaningful gathering and consider the extent to which AFS should be involved actively in other types of meetings apart from the annual meeting (e.g., TOMs). The Committee will develop ideas regarding meeting-related elements in the overall AFS Strategic Plan and work with the AFS Strategic Planning Committee to incorporate its recommendations into the AFS Strategic Plan. Other duties may be assigned to the Committee by the AFS president as needed.

 

The Committee will also review and, if warranted, approve Topic Oriented Meetings (TOMs) submitted by AFS divisions, sections, chapters, or individual members. The committee will approve or reject each proposal based on scientific merit, general appeal, and timeliness of the topic. The committee may solicit comments from experts to assist in the review. Once approved, the proposal would be submitted to the AFS Executive Director to determine the extent of AFS financial support for the TOM. The Committee

 

will publicize by email, the AFS web site, articles in Fisheries, etc. the opportunity for AFS members to submit TOMs proposals. In addition, the committee will maintain contact with appropriate committees or individuals in other fisheries societies worldwide and international organizations with fisheries interests to stimulate joint sponsorship of TOMs, particularly at international locations.

 

Operational Guidelines:

None specified, except that a subcommittee to deal with TOMs may be requested in the future.

 

 

 

Membership Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Maintain or increase Society membership and recommend appropriate measures to attract new members and retain existing members. Monitor attitudes of members toward the Society by means of surveys, correspondence, and other avenues of communication. Recommend programs to address membership professional needs and problems.

 

Composition:

 

Up to nine members with staggered two-year terms; half of whom are appointed by each new AFS President who designates the Chair from among the Committee. Members will include the AFS First Vice-President, Second Vice-President, President-Elect, and Chairs of Division Membership Committees.

 

Duties:

 

1.   Through periodic revision and annual implementation of the Membership Recruitment and Retention Plan, institute activities to retain and increase AFS membership, working with the Governing Board and AFS staff as needed for policy approval and program implementation, respectively.

 

2.   Consult with previous year’s Committee in order to continue projects in progress and to

assess likely new projects.

 

3.   Coordinate activities with the Membership Coordinator and the Executive Director, especially regarding mailings and notices in Fisheries.

 

4.   Coordinate activities with Division and other unit Membership Committees to maximize benefits of all membership committee efforts.

 

5.   Contact Presidents of units and chairs of Society Committees to determine current membership concerns.

 

6.   Contact the Executive Director and Society officers regularly to determine if new or continuing membership concerns have developed or intensified. Identify appropriate Units or Officers who can address concerns noted by members and ensure necessary contacts are made for follow-up.

 

7.   Contact related natural resource societies to anticipate emerging membership concerns;

design and perform activities to gather data relative to those concerns.

 

8.   Every 3 to 5 years as deemed necessary by the Executive Director and the Officers, design and perform or oversee surveys that determine the extent and specific nature of identified concerns. Cooperate with other AFS Units in their survey designs to ensure that membership concerns are adequately addressed. Contract surveys with approval of the Executive Director.

 

9.   Recommend to the Governing Board changes in AFS structure, operation, and programs to improve membership satisfaction.

 

10. Develop direction and agenda for AFS Strategic Plan.

 

 

 

Names of Aquatic Invertebrates Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Reviews matters pertaining to the common and scientific names of aquatic invertebrates; prepares checklists of names to achieve uniformity and avoid confusion in nomenclature; coordinates its activities with those of other organizations worldwide.  Chair is the custodian of the master checklists.

 

Composition:

 

Chair plus any number of others, as deemed appropriate by the Chair, who are specialists in invertebrate taxonomy and nomenclature.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

1.  Chair maintains master file of common and scientific names of invertebrates.

 

2.  Prepares and updates AFS publications on common and scientific names of invertebrates.

 

3.  Monitors the scientific literature to determine needs for changes, clarifications, or systematic revisions of names or naming systems of invertebrates.

 

4.  Provides advice to AFS members and units regarding invertebrate name problems.

 

5.  Coordinates activities with similar organizations worldwide and with the Names of

Fishes Committee.

 

6.  Develops implementing direction and agenda for the AFS Strategic Plan.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

None specified at this time

 

 

 

Names of Fishes Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Reviews matters pertaining to the common and scientific names of fishes; prepares checklists of names to achieve uniformity and avoid confusion in nomenclature; coordinates its activities with those of other ichthyological organizations worldwide.

 

This is a joint committee with the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists (ASIH).  Committee members are jointly appointed by AFS and ASIH.  The Chair serves as custodian of the master checklist.

 

Composition:

 

Chair and six others who are specialists in systematic ichthyology and fisheries biology and members come from the United States, Canada, and Mexico.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

1.  Chair maintains file of master lists of common and scientific names of fishes.

 

2.  Typically, once a decade prepares and updates the AFS publication on common and scientific names of fishes.

 

3.  Monitors the scientific literature to determine need for changes, clarifications, or systematic revisions of names or naming systems of fishes.

 

4.  Provides advice to AFS staff, members, and units regarding relevant name problems.

 

5.  Coordinates activities with those of other ichthyological organizations worldwide and with the Names of Aquatic Invertebrates Committee.

 

6.  Develops implementing direction and agenda for the AFS Strategic Plan.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

The committee meets with its Advisory committee at each annual meeting of the

American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists.

 

In addition, two dedicated committee meetings of several days length are required, about

3 and 1 year before manuscript submission.

 

 

 

New Initiatives Coordinator

 

Purpose:

 

Assists the Governing Board, Officers and the Executive Director with solicitation and selection of strategic projects that enhance member and unit services while advancing the major goals and mission of the AFS.

 

Composition:

 

One person appointed from among the Management Committee members by the

President in consultation with the Management Committee to serve for a one-year term.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

The Coordinator considers proposals and may request clarification or merging of two or more initiatives that are similar.  The Coordinator prepares a list of proposed initiatives and presents the list, along with accompanying proposals, to the AFS Officers and Executive Director, no less than three weeks prior to the mid-year meeting.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

See the “PROCEDURES FOR IDENTIFYING AND IMPLEMENTING NEW

INITIATIVES” for details.

 

 

 

Nominating Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Prepares a slate of candidates for the Society offices of Second Vice-President, First Vice-President, and President-Elect according to procedures approved by the Governing Board.  It must name at least two candidates for Second Vice President.

 

Composition:

 

Ten members as follows:  Chair, appointed by the AFS President; one person elected by each Division (four in total); four persons elected by the Governing Board at the Annual Meeting; and the Immediate Past-President of the Society.  Each of the four Division Presidents should inform the incoming AFS President of the name of the Division’s elected representative to the Society Nominating Committee prior to the Annual Meeting. The newly-installed AFS President needs to have those names so they can be eliminated from consideration when the Governing Board elects its four members to the Nominating Committee during the Incoming Governing Board Meeting held following the Annual Business Meeting.

 

DUTIES:

 

The Chair of the Nominating Committee shall direct the nomination and voting procedure and tally the votes as outlined in the following steps. In order to comply with the specific and rigid timelines detailed in these procedures, the chair must contact the committee immediately after the AFS Annual Meeting and hold committee members to the

timetable.

 

1.  All ten members of the Committee, including the Chair, may nominate one or two candidates for Second Vice-President.  Accordingly, the number of candidates in any given year may be as many as twenty.

 

2.  Each Committee member shall vote on five of the candidates by assigning five points to the first preference, four points for second choice, etc.–one point for fifth choice.  The Chair may vote only if her/his signed ballot is mailed to the

AFS President at the same time as ballots are mailed to the other Nominating

Committee members.

 

3.  Votes will be evaluated by the Chair who determines the top two candidates on the basis of the highest point total.

 

4.  Total point ties for first and second, or second and third positions, go to the candidate with the greatest number of first place votes (5’s).  If a tie cannot be resolved by this procedure, then a second vote will be required.  In this case only the tied candidates are voted upon.  If a tie still remains after the second vote, the AFS President will cast the tie-breaking vote.

 

5.  Written results of the nomination and vote, including the ballots, shall be forwarded to the Executive Director or the AFS President for audit as soon as the two candidates for Second Vice-President have been determined by vote.  The Executive Director and the AFS President shall review the results before they are announced.

 

6.  The candidate in third place following the vote of the Committee and the candidate in second place after the general membership vote for Second Vice- President, shall automatically be considered as possible nominees by the Nominating Committee for the following year.  This last stipulation mandates forwarding the names and biographical information of those individuals to the Unit Services Coordinator at Headquarters for transmission to the Committee Chair for the following year.

 

7.  This is a confidential process; Committee members may not discuss the individuals on the list or the rankings with anyone other than other Committee members.

 

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

The duties are to be implemented as follows. With the consent of all committee members, all written materials including ballots may be exchanged among committee members electronically.

 

 

1.  A biographical sketch (background), some comments on the state of the Society (AFS involvement), and some steps that might be undertaken as AFS President to address major issues (Vision Statement) should be prepared by each candidate and forwarded by November15 to the member of the Committee advancing the candidate’s name for consideration. The statement should be no more than two type-written pages. Each Committee member shall inform his/her candidate(s) that the Committee does not encourage or appreciate receiving any additional vote solicitation contact or information.

 

2.  Each Committee member should submit the name(s) of his/her candidate(s), the biographical sketches, and comments to the Chair by November 20.

 

3.  The biographical sketches and comments by nominating committee members for all candidates will be forwarded with a ballot to all members of the Committee by December 1.

 

4.  Ballots should be returned to the Chair by December 15. The Committee Chair will communicate the results to the President and Executive Director

immediately.

 

 

 

5.  The Committee Chair shall notify the first- and second-ranked candidates as soon as he/she has been informed by the AFS President or Executive Director that they have audited the Committee Chair’s tally of the votes and have approved.  The Committee Chair shall let the remaining candidates know who placed first, second, and third and will

 

forward the third-ranked candidate’s file to the Unit Services Coordinator at

Headquarters for transmission to the next year’s Committee Chair.

 

 

6.  When notifying the winning candidates the Chair will request that they update or revise, if they wish, their biographical sketches and vision statements for AFS and send them to the Chair with a photograph by January 5.

 

 

7.  The Chair will forward these materials to the editor of Fisheries by an absolute deadline of January 10 so that the nominees will be announced in the February issue of Fisheries. The slate must be announced at least 60 days before election ballots are mailed to the AFS membership.  This will allow sufficient time for possible nominations by petition.

 

 

8. Following the election, the Committee Chair will forward the unsuccessful candidate’s file to the Unit Services Coordinator at Headquarters for transmission to the next year’s Committee Chair.

 

 

 

 Past  Cons titu tiona l  Consu ltant’s  Adv isory  Cou n cil

 

Purpose:

 

Advises Constitutional Consultant and the Executive Director on matters of parliamentary procedure.  Serves as a source of AFS history and practices about past society function and structure.  Identifies potential candidates for the Apprentice Constitutional Consultant.  (Article IX  2. R)

 

Composition:

 

All living past AFS Constitutional Consultants.  The Immediate Past Constitutional Consultant serves as chair and may assume the duties of the Constitutional Consultant, if that person is absent or unable to act.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

Provides advice and support to the Constitutional Consultant by researching issues of parliamentary procedure, drafting amendments and guidance documents, providing training, and other supportive functions as requested by the Constitutional Consultant, President, Executive Director, or other AFS leaders.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

None specified at this time.

 

 

 

 Past  Presid en ts’  Advi so ry  Coun cil

 

Purpose:

 

Advises the Governing Board and the Executive Director on matters of mutual interest. Serves as a source of AFS history and practices about past society activities.  Identifies ways or develops an organizational structure for greater participation for retirees. Identifies candidates for Honorary Membership in the Society.  (Article IX  2. R)

 

Composition:

 

All living past AFS Presidents.  The Immediate Past President serves as chair.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

Solicits nominations and selects the winners of The President’s Fishery Conservation Award, and the William E. Ricker Resource Conservation Award, and administers the Retired Members Travel Award to the AFS annual meeting.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

See the “SOCIETY AWARDS” section for details on the above mentioned awards.

 

 

 

Program Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Assembles  and administers the program for the annual Society meeting.  The Chair is selected four years in advance. (See Article III.1.C.iv in Constitution).

 

Composition:

 

Chair plus an indefinite number of others as desired by the AFS President and the Chair, appointed to one-year terms.  Also there should be three others who have been designated by successive Second Vice-Presidents and who will chair the Committee in succeeding years, thus serving a four-year term.  President-Elect is a member.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

1.  Plans, develops, and administers the technical program

 

2.  Records all changes and improvements in the procedures and forward to the next

year’s Chair and Society Headquarters.

 

3.  Develops implementing direction and agenda for the AFS Strategic Plan

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

None specified at this time

 

 

 

Publications Award Committee (See also Awards section of Procedures)

 

Purpose:

 

The committee evaluates articles and notes published in the five American Fisheries Society scientific journals for the preceding year to select the best paper published in each journal for respective awards.  The five annual awards are as follows:

 

1.   The Robert L. Kendall Award for the Best Paper in the Transactions of the

American Fisheries Society.

 

2.   The Mercer H. Patriarche Best Paper Award for the North American Journal of

Fisheries Management.

 

3.   The Best Paper in the North American Journal of Aquaculture.

 

4.   The Best Paper in the Journal of Aquatic Animal Health.

 

5.   The Best Paper in Marine and Coastal Fisheries: Dynamics, Management, and

Ecosystem Science.

 

Composition:

 

The committee is composed of five subcommittees, one for each journal and award. Committee membership consists of the Committee Chair, five Subcommittee Chairs, and a minimum of five additional members of each subcommittee.  Committee Chair is appointed by the AFS President; Subcommittee Chairs are appointed by the AFS President in consultation with the Committee Chair; and Subcommittee members are appointed by the AFS President in consultation with the Committee Chair and respective Subcommittee Chairs.  Committee membership is selected to reflect diversity in demography, geography, and expertise.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

1.   Committee Chair solicits participation and recommends Subcommittee Chairs to AFS President for appointment.  Subcommittee Chairs solicit participation and recommend subcommittee members to the Committee Chair and AFS President for appointment.

 

2.   Committee Chair provides Subcommittee Chairs with guidance on subcommittee member selection and procedures to evaluate papers.  In general, paper evaluation will consist of a two-stage process of review and ranking, with each

subcommittee member evaluating all papers published in the applicable volume. The first round of evaluation and subsequent voting is designed to select a subset of finalist papers to be reconsidered as the best paper.  The second round of voting will select the best paper from that subset determined in the first round.

Procedural details may vary among years, as developed and refined by the Committee Chair with suggestions from Subcommittee Chairs, but should be consistent among subcommittees within a year.

 

3.   Subcommittee Chairs will provide their subcommittee’s best paper selection to

the Committee Chair, who will compile results and forward to the AFS President. Upon approval from the AFS President, the Committee Chair or AFS President will notify award recipients of their honor.  Committee members will receive letters of acknowledgment and gratitude from the Subcommittee Chairs, Committee Chair, or the AFS President.  Best papers and award recipients should be selected well in advance of 60 days before the Annual Meeting to allow adequate time for award preparation and announcements.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

Criteria for the Best Paper Award for AFS Journals

 

1.   As a minimum, the paper should satisfy the basic concerns as established in the Guide for Reviewers for Transactions of the American Fisheries Society.  Some of those are summarized as follows:

 

a.  Is the paper understandable, scientifically sound, and technically reliable?

 

b.  Are the statistical tests, if any, appropriate for the data and correctly applied?

 

c.  Are the conclusions adequately supported by the data?

 

d.  Is the contribution sufficiently integrated with existing knowledge?

 

2.   If the paper reports experimental work, it should indicate that the study had a

clear objective or hypothesis that was rigorously tested, and was well planned and methodically executed.  Consideration should be given to studies that show creative original design or present new approaches for solving problems associated with fish biology.

 

3.   If the paper is descriptive in nature (for example, of a disease process or a previously unknown phenomenon), it should cover the subject thoroughly and in a clear, concise, logical manner.

 

4.   If a review paper, the article should cover the literature completely and objectively, and represent a critical, up-to-date synthesis of the subject.

 

5.   If there are alternative explanations for results or conclusions presented, those arguments should be adequately addressed in the paper.

 

6.   The paper should hold the interest of specialists in the particular field as well as being clearly understandable and interesting for a general fisheries audience and other members of the scientific community.  In that context, both content and presentation are important considerations.

 

7.   The length of the paper should be sufficient to reflect the extent of work involved and discuss the results thoroughly, but not be overly repetitive or too long.

Length itself should not be a criterion.

 

 

 

Publications Overview Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Provides overall publication and editorial review for the Society to ensure coherent planning and development of Society and unit publication programs.

 

Composition:

 

At least nine persons with staggered three-year terms, at least three of whom shall be appointed by each new AFS President who shall also designate the Chair from among the whole Committee; the Publications Manager is a nonvoting member and the President- Elect is a voting member.

 

.

 

Duties:

 

 

1.  Monitors publication activities and decisions to ensure conformance with established practices and policies.

 

2.  Evaluates current and proposed practices and policies; reports evaluation to the

Governing Board, Executive Director, and Publications Manager as appropriate.

 

3.  Interprets editorial and publication policies and practices at the request of AFS

members and staff.

 

4.  Assists the Publications Manager in the administration of the publications functions of the Society.

 

5.  Anticipates publication and editorial concerns of the profession and Society; performs necessary activities to gather data or opinions as the basis for anticipated changes in publication or editorial functions.

 

6. Develops and helps implement a strategic plan for AFS publications.

 

7.  Develops implementing direction and agenda for the AFS Strategic Plan.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

None specified at this time

 

 

 

Raffle Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Administers the Society raffle at the Annual Meeting.  The proceeds to be divided as follows:  70% to the AFS Skinner Fund, 30% to the local unit hosting the raffle.  If no local host then 100% to the Skinner Fund.

 

Composition:

 

Committee is composed of members of the local host unit.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

Solicit prizes, recognize sponsors, organize and coordinate selling of tickets and publicity, conduct raffle at meeting, write thank you letters to sponsors, mail unclaimed prizes.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

None specified at this time

 

 

 

Resolutions Committee

 

Purpose:

 

The Committee drafts resolutions, screens and edits resolutions submitted to it by officers, members, or units, and presents its slate of resolutions for vote at the Society’s Annual Meeting.  The two types of resolutions include internal resolutions, which relate

 

entirely to AFS matters, and external resolutions, which relate to broad national or international issues outside of AFS.

 

Composition:

 

Nine members, which include the Chairs of the four Division Resolutions Committees and five others appointed by the AFS President.  Chair is appointed by AFS President from among these nine; First Vice-President and the Chair of the Resource Policy are members.

 

Duties:

 

1.   Chair solicits resolutions from all units and committee chairs in the fall, urging early submittal to receive proper consideration.  Chapter-based resolutions should receive prior Division action before submission to Resolutions Committee; those sent directly without Division acknowledgement or action will be returned to the Division Resolutions Committee.

 

2.   Internal resolutions may be received at any time and do not require approval by the Governing Board; external resolutions must be received by Chair at least 60 days before the Annual Meeting and much sooner if possible.  Adequate time is needed for Committee review.  Resolutions submitted less than 30 days prior to the Annual Meeting or at the meeting should be limited to emergency situations.

 

3.   Committee develops and presents at the annual AFS Business Meeting an internal resolution recognizing the efforts of the Local Arrangements Committee and the Program Committee in hosting and organizing the annual meeting.  The Chair communicates with the Unit Services Coordinator at Headquarters to ensure commemorative plaques are available to be presented to the appropriate Arrangements and Program committee chairs.

 

4.   Chair serves as a member of the Resource Policy Committee to coordinate with that

Committee regarding issues identified by both or either Committee.

 

5.   Committee reviews all external resolutions it receives from AFS subunits to determine whether or not the issue is suitable for a national external resolution as per the AFS Policy Statement on Advocacy. The Committee will decide whether the issue under consideration is most suitably addressed with either a Resource Policy, a Position

Statement, a Legislative Briefing Statement or a Resolution. In brief, resolutions are issue statements that are peer-reviewed by committees and approved by members online or at

an official Society or subunit meeting. They are less analytical than position statements or legislative briefing statements but must be consistent with them (and with policies).

 

6.   Resource policies are general statements of principle about resource topics that explain and justify the Society’s perspective or attitude in largely philosophical terms. Resource policies are reviewed and approved by the membership and have a long life span, perhaps

10-20 years.

 

7.   Position statements are specific stands on specific issues. They are prepared by experts, scientifically documented, and rigorously reviewed. They must be consistent with Society policies, and they are approved by the Society’s Governing Board or a subunit executive committee (depending on their level of applicability).

 

8.   Legislative briefing statements are specific stands on specific items of legislation. They are developed and approved like position statements, with which they must be consistent.

 

9.   Committee will only deal with matters deemed appropriate for a resolution. Matters considered best handled by resource policies, position statements and legislative briefing statements will be referred to the President by the Chair.

 

10. Committee reviews proposed external resolutions to determine that they meet criteria as described in the “Procedures for Submitting, Considering, and Implementing Resolutions,” established by the Executive Committee in 1983.

 

11. Committee votes on all proposed external resolutions to determine which should be recommended for consideration by the AFS membership. The committee then forwards the recommended external resolutions to the Governing Board to determine whether the resolution should be published for review by the membership.

 

12. If deemed appropriate by the Committee and Governing Board, external resolutions and all supporting rationale or justification documents will be posted to the AFS website in a secure format (e.g., pdf) and notice of such postings shall be sent to all members by electronic mail. If time permits, a notice will be published in Fisheries, directing members to review the draft resolution  on the AFS website. When feasible, members will be given at least 30 days to review and comment on the resolution. Members shall submit comments online and also by email to the Chair.

 

13. After the member comment period, the Chair should consolidate all comments and work with the Resolutions Committee to develop a response memo within 30 days. This response memo should identify the Committee’s recommendation on whether the public comments were substantive enough to require major editing and/or withdrawal of the external resolution, or if only minor editing is needed.

 

14. The Chair presents the external resolution and response memo to the Governing Board, either electronically or at the Governing Board’s annual business meeting. Within 60

days, the Governing Board will make a decision as to whether to pursue membership vote of the resolution, and if the vote should take place electronically or at the Society

Business Meeting. Electronic voting should follow established procedures.

 

15. If voting takes place at the Society Business Meeting, the Chair, or a representative, presents resolutions to the membership at the Annual Meeting on each resolution by moving acceptance of the resolution.  (Note:  Although the Chair presents the resolution, she/he is not obliged to defend or speak in favor of the resolution.)

 

16. Approved resolutions are published in Fisheries and posted in a secure format on the

AFS website.

 

17. Committee recommends direction and agenda for the AFS Strategic Plan to implement approved resolutions as needed.

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

See “Procedure for Submitting, Considering, and Implementing Resolutions.”

 

Resource Policy Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Committee helps the Society evaluate, develop and maintain resource policies by assessing concerns of the membership, advising the AFS President and Executive Director about aquatic resource issues, producing or coordinating draft resource policy statements for Society approval, and reviewing approved policies to ensure usefulness.

 

Composition:

 

Chair, Vice-Chair and up to fifteen members, appointed for staggered 2 year terms. Membership is renewable for an additional two terms for a maximum total of 6 years. No more than eight members should be replaced during any one calendar year.  At least one member shall be from Canada or Mexico. The President-Elect is a voting member.

The Editor of Fisheries, Executive Director, and Policy and Development Coordinator shall be nonvoting members.  In alternate years, the incoming Society President appoints the Vice-Chair who shall serve for two years, followed by two years as the Chair. The cycle can be adjusted if the President asks the current Chair to serve an additional term. The Chair shall serve no more than two consecutive 2 year terms, but may return as a Committee member or Chair after a hiatus of at least 1 year. The combination of terms and roles is intended to provide opportunities for broad membership representation on the Committee.

 

Duties:

 

1.   Guides the process to prepare policy statements for Society approval according to “Protocol for Establishing American Fisheries Society Policy Statements,” and “Guide for the Submission of AFS Policy Statements.”

 

2.   Coordinates with the Executive Director and other Society representatives to seek scientific analysis on important resource issues resulting in recommendations for guidance, approaches, or positions that AFS can endorse.

 

3.   Works with AFS staff to write to appropriate individuals about AFS positions on resource issues.

 

4.   Assesses resource concerns of the membership and determines the need for developing policy statements, working closely with other AFS units.

 

5.   Coordinates activities with Resolutions Committee Chair, forwarding issues that should be covered by resolutions.

 

6.   Invites suggestions from all AFS units on issues that could be covered by a new AFS

policy.

 

7.   Recommends direction and agenda for the AFS Strategic Plan to implement approved policy statements as needed.

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

See “Procedure for Developing and Advancing Resource Issues” and “Procedures for

Developing and Advancing AFS Resource Policy Statements.”

 

Time and Place Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Generates competitive proposals for the site of the AFS meeting four years hence from which the Governing Board shall choose one site.

 

Composition:

 

Nine voting members including the Chair.  The incoming AFS President shall designate the Chair from among the whole committee. Six members will have staggered three-year terms, two of whom shall be appointed by each new AFS President.  Voting members also include the immediate past General Meeting Chair (Chair of Arrangements Committee) and the current Second Vice-President. The newly-elected incoming Second

Vice-President who will be presiding over the meeting for which time and place are being selected participates in committee deliberations, including reviewing the presentations by bidders, and casts a vote only in case of a tie. Voting is conducted by secret ballot.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

1.  Solicit, with the help of the AFS staff, proposals to host the Annual Meeting from state/provincial agencies, AFS Chapters, or other organizations located within the Division in which the meeting is to be held four years hence.

 

2.  Provide prospective bidders, through AFS staff, with the guidelines and format for preparing a written bid package and oral presentation to the Committee at the Annual Meeting.

 

3.  Screen written proposals prior to the Annual Meeting to determine which are acceptable on the basis of specific guidelines established in the bid package.

 

4.  Chair notifies acceptable bidders to prepare an oral presentation for the Time and

Place Committee meeting to be held during the Annual Meeting.

 

5.  Meet during Annual Meeting to hear oral presentations from prospective bidders. Evaluation of bids is based both on oral and written proposals and a recommendation is prepared for the Incoming Governing Board.

 

6.  Chair presents options for time and place to the Incoming Governing Board which is the final authority on the site selection.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

None specified at this time

 

 

 

Vote Auditor

 

Purpose:

 

Verifies voting results and/or counts the election ballots, transmits the results to the AFS President and/or Unit Officer and Executive Director within the designated number of days of the closing date of the vote or election, and announces the results at the annual Society meeting or as appropriate.  The Vote Auditor sends electronic results and/or

 

ballots to the Executive Director, who shall hold them at least 90 days after the close of the vote or election.

 

Composition:

 

Vote Auditor and Co-Auditor are appointed by the AFS President for staggered two-year terms.

 

Duties:

 

1. Works with the AFS Officers or other unit leaders in the development of fair and equitable voting procedures designed to ensure that each member has an opportunity to vote confidentially and only once.

 

2. Participates in the selection of services to provide electronic voting capabilities to the Society.  Individual units may be responsible for their own voting services, as appropriate.

 

3. May communicate with the service provider to obtain specific information on the process (e.g., adequate provisions for notification, accuracy, secrecy, equity, and qualification of voters).

 

4. In the case of Officer elections, works with the Executive Director to ensure that the Ballot is prepared and transmitted to the membership in May, with a 30-day response period that typically closes at the end of June.

 

5.  Checks with electronic ballot service provider periodically to ensure election is running smoothly. As necessary, the Vote Auditor may count paper ballots received from members who do not have electronic access for voting.

 

6.  Verifies results within 30 days after the deadline for ballot returns.

 

7.  Transmits results to AFS President or appropriate Unit Officers and Executive

Director immediately after verification or counting of votes.

 

8.  Protects confidentiality of these processes; results shall not be discussed with anyone other than the AFS President or appropriate Unit Officers and the Executive Director.

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

None specified at this time

 

SOCIETY AWARDS

 

 

The Awards Committee, a Standing Committee within the Society, is responsible for overseeing most Society awards.  However, several Society awards are administered by other Standing Committees or Sections.  The Unit Services Coordinator is the Staff contact person for award chairs.  Award recipients are formally announced during the Annual Meeting.  See also the Standing and Special Committees section for more information about the Awards Committee and Publications Award Committee.

 

 

 

Award of Excellence

 

Background:  This award was established in 1969 and is the Society’s highest award for scientific achievement. The award is presented to a living person for original and outstanding contributions to fisheries and aquatic biology. Eligibility is not restricted to AFS members. The award consists of a bronze medal, a certificate mounted in a plaque, and travel and related expenses if needed (no greater than $1,000) to attend the Annual Meeting for presentation of the award.

 

Committee composition:  The Chair, plus at least six others, appointed by the AFS President.

 

Duties: Seeks nominations and selects the recipient of the Award of Excellence by fulfilling duties as described in the Awards Committee Section of the Procedures and by developing and implementing a method for selecting a recipient from among the candidates submitted (no more than one recipient per year may be selected; the committee may vote to select no recipient).

 

Criteria:  A monumental work; original techniques or research methods; new, fresh ideas, viewpoints, or data that contribute remarkably to conservation management or basic understanding of aquatic resources; a new, successfully executed fishery research or management program of national or international importance; imaginative and successful programs in fish conservation, education at any level of teaching or graduate student guidance; important faunal or ecological discoveries or new taxonomic criteria; research especially beneficial to mankind; interdisciplinary research involving leadership in team efforts in the laboratory or field; or multiple successful efforts in a variety of fields such as biology, public understanding, technical and popular writing, laboratory and field research, inspirational leadership, and enunciation of principles.  The nomination should include a CV and supporting letters in addition to the main nomination letter.  Include the nominee’s title and full contact information (address, email, and phone).

 

Specifications and limitations:  The award will only be made in such years as there is

substantial or unanimous agreement among members of the Award of Excellence Committee that an award is justified.

 

 

 

 

Carl R. Sullivan Fishery Conservation Award

 

Background:  This award, known as the “Sully,” was created in 1991 and was first awarded to

Carl Sullivan shortly before his death.   It is awarded annually in his memory.  It is given to an

 

individual or organization, professional or nonprofessional, for outstanding contributions to the conservation of fishery resources (as opposed to the Ricker award’s focus on aquatic resource conservation). Eligibility is not restricted to AFS members.  The award consists of a fish carving. Accomplishments can include political, legal, educational, scientific, and managerial successes.

 

Committee composition:  This subcommittee is composed of the AFS President-Elect as Chair; three AFS Section representatives who are presidents in the year of their appointment; three members representing the conservation, recreational fishing, and commercial fishing communities respectively; and the First Vice-President.  Appointments of subcommittee members are made by the President-Elect, following consultation with the President and First Vice-President.  The Chair serves 1 year, the other members serve 3 years, with two members rotating off annually.

 

Duties: Seeks nominations and selects the recipient of the award by fulfilling duties as described in the Awards Committee Section of the Procedures. The recipient will be selected by a majority vote of the subcommittee following a review of the nominees’ qualifications. The nominations of unsuccessful candidates are to be automatically carried forward so that the candidate is

considered three times before re-nomination is necessary.  Nominations should be forwarded to the Unit Services Coordinator and First Vice-President.

 

Criteria:

 

1.   The recipient must have made a substantial contribution, of national or international significance, with a high probability of focusing attention of the fisheries community on the continuing need to use our fisheries resources wisely.  The contribution may be single or lifelong, focused on broad, site-specific, or geographically extensive accomplishments.

2.   The recipient’s contribution will likely become widely known in the fisheries community

because it will effect substantive beneficial changes in the understanding, management, or use of fishery resources.

3.   The recipient’s contribution may be in any area of fishery conservation, including research, management, education, public service, or leadership which effects a positive change benefiting fishery resources.

 

The nomination should include a CV and supporting letters in addition to the main nomination

letter.  Include the nominee’s title and full contact information (address, email, and phone).

 

 

 

 

Distinguished Service Award

 

Background:  This award was established in 1980 and is presented in recognition of outstanding contributions of time and energy for special projects or activities by AFS members. The number of recipients may vary from year to year, with no mandatory number to be selected.  A single member, a group of members, and AFS staff are eligible candidates.  The award consists of a certificate mounted in a plaque.

 

Committee composition:  Chaired by the AFS President-Elect with at least two other Governing

Board members or immediate past members, each representing a different Division and appointed by the AFS President.

 

Duties: Seeks nominations and selects the recipient(s) of the AFS Distinguished Service Award by fulfilling duties as described in the Awards Committee Section of the Procedures.  The committee screens and distributes the final list of candidates, with a biographical sketch or nomination statement for each, to the AFS President. The President facilitates a vote by the Governing Board to select award recipients.

 

Criteria: Criteria are given above in the Background section.

 

 

 

 

Emmeline Moore Prize

 

Background:  AFS established a career achievement award, named after the first female AFS president, Emmeline Moore (1927-1928), to recognize efforts of an AFS member in the promotion of demographic diversity in the society. This award is presented to a member who demonstrates strong commitment and exemplary service to ensuring equal opportunity access to higher education in fisheries and/or professional development in the broad range of fisheries science disciplines. Qualified nominees must exhibit clear evidence of service and commitment to diversity initiatives, including a strong research or fisheries management leadership background, public understanding of diversity issues, technical and popular writing, and inspirational leadership. Candidates should also have enunciated principles that lead to greater involvement of under-represented groups in fisheries science, education, research or

management. The award consists of a bronze medal, a certificate, and travel and related expenses if needed (no greater than $1,000) to attend the AFS Annual Meeting for presentation of the

prize.

 

Committee composition: The Chair, appointed by the AFS President, plus the presidents of the following Sections if active: Equal Opportunities Section, Education Section, International Fisheries Section, Canadian Aquatic Resources Section, Fisheries Administration Section, Fisheries History Section, Native Peoples Fisheries Section, and at least one AFS member at large. The chair may be one of the Section Presidents named above.

 

Duties: Seeks nominations and selects the recipient of the Emmeline Moore Prize by fulfilling duties as described in the Awards Committee Section of the Procedures and by developing and implementing a method for selecting a recipient from among the candidates submitted (no more than one recipient per year may be selected; the committee may vote to select no recipient).

 

Criteria:

 

1.   The recipient has made outstanding contribution to improvements in access to higher education or the fisheries professions by under-represented groups.

2.   The recipient has made multiple successful efforts in a variety of fields such as biology, public understanding, technical and popular writing, inspirational leadership, and enunciation of principles that lead to a greater involvement of under-represented groups in fisheries education, research and management.

3.   This award is a career achievement award.

 

The nomination should include a CV and supporting letters in addition to the main nomination letter.  Include the nominee’s title and full contact information (address, email, and phone).

 

Specifications and limitations: The award will only be made in such years as there is substantial or unanimous agreement among members of the Emmeline Moore Prize Committee that an award is justified.

 

 

 

 

Excellence in Fisheries Education Award

 

Background:  The Excellence in Fisheries Education Award was established in 1988. The award is presented to an AFS member to recognize excellence in organized teaching and advising in some aspect of fisheries education. Nominees may be involved in extension or continuing education, as well as traditional or online college and university instruction. The award includes

a monetary reward and a certificate mounted in a plaque.

Committee composition: The award is administered by the AFS Education Section. Duties: Selection of the award recipient; details determined by the AFS Education Section. Criteria:  Nominees must have been actively engaged in fisheries education within the past 5

years, and have had at least 10 years of professional employment experience in fisheries education. Two or more people may serve as nominators, but at least one nominator must be an AFS member. The nomination should include a CV and supporting letters in addition to the main nomination letter.  Include the nominee’s title and full contact information (address, email, and phone).  Letters documenting the contributions of the nominee (awards, descriptions of exemplary service, innovations, number of students taught and advised, and post graduate achievements of former students, etc.) are used to evaluate nominees.

 

 

 

 

Excellence in Public Outreach Award

 

Background:  This award was established in 1998.  It is presented to an AFS member who goes the “extra mile” in sharing the value of fisheries science/research with the general public through the popular media and other communication channels.  Evidence of the nominee teaching others how to communicate with the public also is weighed in the selection process. The award consists of a certificate mounted in a plaque.

 

Committee composition:  The award is administered by the AFS External Affairs Committee.

 

Duties: Selection of the award recipient; details determined by the AFS External Affairs

Committee.

 

Criteria: Two or more individuals may act as nominators, but at least one nominator must be an

AFS member. Entries must include a biographical sketch of the nominee (not to exceed three

 

pages) and supporting evidence of communicating the value of fisheries issues/research to the general public through the media and other communication channels, plus any evidence of teaching others about communication with the public. The award recipient will be selected according to the following criteria:  1) Published articles about research or fisheries management in lay publications; 2) experience as a spokesperson for fisheries issues with the media and public; 3) experience teaching others about the importance of communication with the public through course work and or projects; and 4) other examples of personal and professional efforts to educate the public about fisheries issues.  The nomination should include a CV and supporting letters in addition to the main nomination letter.  Include the nominee’s title and full contact information (address, email, and phone).

 

 

 

 

Golden Membership

 

Background:  These awards were first presented in 1988 to recognize 50 years of AFS

membership.  The award is a certificate mounted in a plaque.

 

 

 

 

Honorary Membership

 

Background:  This award is documented under Article II (a) (3) of the Constitution.  Briefly stated, Honorary Members are nominated upon presentation of a petition, signed by at least 100 active AFS members, and approval is subject to a vote by the membership.  Since 1989,

however, sometimes the process has been formalized by the appointment of a Special Committee by the AFS President to provide nominating petitions.  Upon election to Honorary Membership by a 2/3 majority of the voting members, the individual receives permanent dues-free membership and is awarded a certificate attesting to the honor.

 

Criteria: Presented to individuals who have achieved outstanding professional accomplishments or have given outstanding service to the Society.

 

 

 

 

J. Frances Allen Scholarship

 

Background: This $2,500 scholarship was established in 1986 honoring Dr. Allen, who pioneered women’s involvement in AFS and in the field of fisheries, with the intent of encouraging women to become fisheries professionals.  It is awarded annually to a female doctoral candidate who was an AFS member of record by the end of the year preceding application.  The applicant must be conducting aquatic research, which includes all branches of fisheries science and practice.

 

Committee composition:  Administered and determined by the AFS Equal Opportunities

Section

 

Duties: Selection of the award recipient; details determined by the AFS Equal Opportunities

Section

 

Criteria: Recipients are selected with emphasis placed on research promise, scientific merit, and academic achievement.

 

 

 

 

John E. Skinner Memorial Award

 

Background: This award was established in 1978 in memory of John E. Skinner, former President of the California-Nevada Chapter and the Western Division.  The fund provides monetary travel awards to deserving graduate students or exceptional undergraduate students who are active in the fisheries discipline, current AFS members, and who would like to attend the annual meeting.  The award consists of a certificate mounted in a plaque.

 

Committee composition: Recipients are chosen by a committee of the AFS Education Section with composition determined by that section.

 

Duties:  Selection of award recipients; details determined by the AFS Education Section.

 

Criteria:  Selections are based on academic qualifications, professional service and promise, and reasons for wanting to attend the meeting.  Generally, only partial travel support is available in order to distribute the awards to a larger number of deserving recipients.  In 2003 a goal was added to have a minimum of one qualified student from Canada and one from Mexico.

 

 

 

 

Meritorious Service Award

 

Background:  This award, first presented in 1986, is awarded annually to an individual AFS member for unswerving loyalty, dedication, and meritorious service to AFS over a long time; and for exceptional commitment to AFS programs, ideals, objectives, and long-term goals. The award consists of a plaque.

 

Committee composition: The chair and four other members of this subcommittee, one of whom is the Second Vice-President, are appointed by the AFS President.

 

Duties: Seeks nominations and selects the recipient of the award by fulfilling duties as described in the Awards Committee Section of the Procedures and by developing and implementing a method for selecting a recipient from among the candidates submitted (no more than one recipient per year may be selected; the committee may vote to select no recipient).

 

Criteria:  Criteria are given above in the Background section.  The nomination should include a CV and supporting letters in addition to the main nomination letter.  Include the nominee’s title and full contact information (address, email, and phone).

 

Outstanding Chapters and Student Subunit Awards

 

Background:  The Outstanding Chapter Award was established in 1991 to recognize outstanding professionalism, active resource protection and enhancement programs, and commitment to the mission of the Society. In 2003 the award was broken into two categories,

one for a chapter having fewer than 100 members (Small Chapter) and another for a chapter with

100 or more members (Large Chapter).  In 2004, a third award for a Student Subunit was added. The award consists of a certificate mounted in a plaque.

 

Committee composition:  The four committee members are the AFS Divisions’ immediate Past- Presidents.  The AFS President chooses a Chair from among them.

 

Duties: Seeks nominations and selects the recipient of the award by fulfilling duties as described in the Awards Committee Section of the Procedures. Distributes Outstanding Chapters and Student Subunit Award Applications among Chapters, Student Subunits, and Divisions, and informs them of procedures.  Chapters and Student Subunits must submit applications to their Division Presidents for consideration. Division Presidents may nominate up to one large Chapter, one small Chapter, and one Student Subunit from their Divisions.  Committee members evaluate

and vote on the three categories of outstanding chapters as follows: 1st Place Vote- 4 points; 2nd Place Vote- 3 points; 3rd Place Vote- 2 points; 4th Place Vote- 1 point.  For each category, the Chapters or Subunit with most total points is the recipient.  In the case of a tie the Chapters or Subunit with the most first place votes wins.  If the tie still stands, two awards are given.

 

Criteria:  The awards are to be given to Chapters and Subunits that exhibit a commitment to the mission of the Society by actively working to achieve the goals set forth in the Society’s Strategic Plan. The criteria are described in the Outstanding Chapters and Student Subunit

Award Applications, available on the AFS website.

 

 

 

 

 Pr esid en t’s  Fish ery  Co n servation  Aw ard

 

Background:  This award, established in 1995, is presented in two categories: (1) an AFS member or unit, and (2) a non-AFS individual or entity, for singular accomplishments or long- term contributions that advance aquatic resource conservation at a regional or local level (as opposed to the Ricker and Sully awards’ focus on national or international accomplishments). The award consists of a plaque.

 

Committee composition: This award is administered by the Past President’s Advisory Council. The AFS Immediate Past-President serves as chair of the Council and all living past-presidents are Council members.

 

Duties: Seeks nominations and recommends possible recipients of the award to the AFS President by fulfilling duties as described in the Awards Committee Section of the Procedures. The Council will review qualifications of all nominees. A ballot will be provided to each council member to vote for one of three options for each nominee: 1) “yes, qualifies for the award”; 2) “no, not this year but retain in the pool for the next two years”; or 3) “no, not qualified, remove from further consideration unless re-nominated in a future year.” Unsuccessful nominees from a

 

given year will either be removed from the pool if deemed unqualified by a majority of voting Council members, or will remain in the pool and be eligible for reconsideration for the two immediately following years.  Nominees who receive affirmative votes from a majority of voting members shall be recommended to the AFS President. The AFS President makes the final decision on awards.

 

Criteria: Criteria are given above in the Background section. A nomination package should include a strong and detailed letter describing the nominee’s accomplishments and the evidence for being “significant at a regional or local level.”  If the nomination is for an individual, include a CV if possible. Nominations may be supported by multiple individuals by signing one nomination letter, or by submitting supporting letters in addition to the main nomination letter. Include the nominee’s title and full contact information (address, email, and phone). Nominations for the AFS Individual or Entity category should include an endorsement from a relevant AFS Unit (Chapter, Division, or Section) attesting to the member’s activity in the Society.

 

 

 

 

Publication Awards

 

Background:  These awards have a long history, starting with an award to the best paper in the oldest journal, The Best Paper in the Transactions of the American Fisheries Society. As new journals were published, each of these also presented annual awards for best papers. The recipients are selected by the Publication Awards Committee, appointed by the AFS President, with a member or members selected by the Editor of each of the AFS journals. The award consists of a certificate mounted in a plaque.

 

The awards are as follows: 1) the Robert L. Kendall Best Paper in the Transactions of the American Fisheries Society for the year preceding presentation; 2) the Mercer H. Patriarche Best Paper Award for the North American Journal of Fisheries Management for the year preceding presentation; 3) the Best Paper in the North American Journal of Aquaculture for the year preceding presentation; 4) the Best Paper in the Journal of Aquatic Animal Health; and 5) the Best Paper in Marine and Coastal Fisheries: Dynamics, Management, and Ecosystem Science

for the year preceding presentation.

 

Committee composition, Duties, Criteria:  See Publication Awards Committee.

 

 

 

 

Retired Members Travel Award for the AFS Annual Meeting

 

Background:  Established in 2004, this travel award is to encourage and enable retired members of the Society to attend annual meetings, particularly those members who might play a more active role in the meeting.  The Society recognizes that some retired members who desire to participate in the annual meeting might be inhibited for financial reasons.  Retired members may not have funds for travel to meetings that were available to them while employed.  Therefore,

this award is meant for those members who truly have a need for financial assistance.  The

Society has neither means nor desire to verify financial need, so that requests for support are

 

based on an honor system. However, only dues paying retired members are eligible to apply.  A maximum of $1,500 may be awarded for reimbursable expenses.  Multiple awards may be given in any year, subject to the total available amount specified in the AFS budget.

 

Committee composition:  The chair of the Past Presidents’ Advisory Council chairs the committee and will appoint two other members of the committee from the Council.

 

Duties:  Select the recipient(s) by fulfilling duties as described in the Awards Committee Section of the Procedures.  The committee selects potential recipients of the award, and the chair may negotiate with potential recipients to maximize the number of awards.  The chair informs recipients of the amount they will be reimbursed and also informs the AFS Unit Services Coordinator and the Executive Director.

 

Criteria: The award is based on the totality of the contribution that the applicant will make to the AFS Annual Meeting. The committee will consider the activities that the applicant will participate in and other relevant information provided by the applicant.

 

 

 

Steven Berkeley Marine Conservation Fellowship

Background:  This fellowship was created by AFS in 2007 to honor the memory of Steven Berkeley, a dedicated fisheries scientist with a passionate interest in integrating the fields of marine ecology, conservation biology, and fisheries science to improve fisheries management. Berkeley was a long-time member of AFS and a member of the first Board of Directors of the Fisheries Conservation Foundation. The fellowship comprises a competitively based $10,000 award to a graduate student actively engaged in thesis research relevant to marine conservation. Research topics may address any aspect of conservation; a focus on fisheries issues is not required.

 

Committee composition: The award is administered by the AFS Marine Fisheries Section

 

Duties: Selection of the award recipient; details determined by the AFS Marine Fisheries

Section.

 

Criteria:  The fellowship will be awarded on the basis of the relevance of the proposed research, academic achievement, and anticipated future contributions by the applicant.

 

Student Paper-Poster Awards

 

Background:  These awards were established to recognize excellence in research and communication skills among students.  The awards are administered by the Education Section and recipients are selected by a committee of abstract reviewers and presentation judges. Awardees are announced during the annual meeting during the year of presentation.

 

AFS/ SEA Grant Best Student Paper Award

 

Background: This award is co-sponsored by AFS and Sea Grant.  One paper is selected each year.  The student presenting the papers receives a check for $450 and a plaque.   Students selected for an Honorable Mention receive a plaque but no monetary compensation.

 

AFS Best Student Poster Award

 

Background: This award is sponsored by AFS.  One poster is selected each year.  The student presenting the poster receives a check for $450 and a plaque. Students selected for an Honorable Mention receive a plaque but no monetary compensation.

 

Committee composition:  Recipients are chosen by a committee of the AFS Education Section with composition determined by that section.

 

Duties:  Selection of award recipients; details determined by the AFS Education Section.

 

Criteria:  Based on the significance of the material presented and the quality of the presentation. Details determined by the AFS Education Section.

 

 

 

 

Student Writing Award

 

Background:  Undergraduate and graduate students are asked to submit a 500- to 700-word article explaining their own research or a research project in their lab or school. The article must be written in language understandable to the general public (i.e., journalistic style). Students may write about research that has been completed, is in progress, or is in the planning stages. Selected authors receive a plaque recognizing their achievements during the Business Meeting at the AFS Annual Meeting. The selected articles are published in Fisheries.

 

Committee composition: The award is administered by the AFS External Affairs Committee.

 

Duties: Selection of the award recipient; details determined by the AFS External Affairs

Committee.

 

Criteria:  The papers are judged according to their quality and their ability to turn a scientific research topic into a paper for the general public. Examples of past selected papers may be found in Fisheries.

 

 

 

William E. Ricker Resource Conservation Award

 

Background:  Established in 1995, this award is given annually, if warranted, to an individual or organization for singular accomplishments or long-term contributions that advance aquatic resource conservation (as opposed to the Sully award’s focus on fishery conservation) at a national or international level. Eligibility is not restricted to AFS members. The award consists

of a plaque.

 

Committee composition: This award is administered by the Past Presidents’ Advisory Council. The AFS Immediate Past-President serves as chair of the Council and all living past presidents are members of the Council.

 

Duties: Seeks nominations and selects the recipient of the award by fulfilling duties as described in the Awards Committee Section of the Procedures. The Council will review qualifications of

all nominees. A ballot will be provided to each council member to vote for one of three options for each nominee: 1) “yes, qualifies for the award”; 2) “no, not this year but retain in the pool for next two years”; or 3) “no, not qualified, remove from further consideration unless re-nominated in a future year.” Unsuccessful nominees from a given year will either be removed from the pool if deemed unqualified by a majority of voting Council members, or will remain in the pool and

be eligible for reconsideration for the two immediately following years. The recipient must receive affirmative votes from a majority of voting members.

 

Criteria:  Criteria are given above in the Background section. A nomination package should include a strong and detailed letter describing the nominee’s accomplishments and the evidence for being “significant at a national or international level.”  If the nomination is for an individual, include a CV if possible.  Nominations may be supported by multiple individuals by signing one nomination letter, or by submitting supporting letters in addition to the main nomination letter. Include the nominee’s title and full contact information (address, email, and phone).

 

OPERATIONAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

 

 

Activities that occur regularly in the Society have been standardized as fully as possible to ensure ease of performance and consistency of treatment and style.  Therefore, the Society has established a series of operational policies and procedures.  These are intended to help members, rather than to restrict them.  These procedures are always subject to revision, so members should check with the Executive Director before undertaking major projects and should offer AFS staff suggestions for improvements and updates to keep this manual consistent with current practice.

 

Developing and Advancing AFS Positions on Resource Issues

 

The Society promotes the conservation, development, and wise utilization of aquatic resources.  Organizational policies are developed by the membership to guide the executive staff and members on issues affecting aquatic resources, professional ethics, and the environment.  The membership is diverse in terms of geography, experience, and topics of environmental concern.  To properly represent and fully capture the broadest spectrum of knowledge, interest, and concern in such issues, it is important to involve every member, to the extent possible.

 

It is desirable to obtain full, careful, and continuing consideration of aquatic resource issues by all units.  The units should identify and elevate issues to higher levels within the Society for debate, screening, and possible development of formal policy statements.  A protocol is provided for unit involvement, to better enable the Society to identify issues worthy of policy guidance, and to identify informed members with specific capabilities to help the Society prepare scientifically defensible, objective, and technically accurate positions on specific issues.

 

Each Division, Chapter, and Section of the Society should adopt a mechanism through either standing committee, Executive Committee, or by other means whereby issues relating to aquatic resources, professional ethics, and the environment that are of importance to the unit’s members can be routinely identified.  The issues identified should be deemed of sufficient importance and scope as to warrant the development of a formal policy to provide political, social, and/or technical guidance to the staff and

membership of the Society.  Each issue, accompanied by a brief justification of need, and the names and addresses of unit members possessing the interest and knowledge to assist in the preparation of a policy statement should be forwarded to the Chair of the Society’s Resource Policy Committee (RPC).

 

Issues and support documentation are solicited at any juncture during the year.  The RPC Chair will evaluate the submitted materials and, if it is deemed necessary to judge the potential utility and value of specifically proposed policies, he or she will seek further justification including a study report from the sponsoring unit.  The ultimate decision of the RPC Chair relative to accepting, modifying, or rejecting suggested issue topics for development as formal policy statements will be forwarded to the sponsoring unit. Responsibilities for statement development (for those suggestions accepted) will proceed as outlined in the “Protocol for Establishing American Fisheries Society Policy Statements,” which is as follows.

 

Procedures for Developing and Advancing Resource Policy Statements

 

A. Purpose

 

AFS promotes the conservation and sustainability of fishery resources and aquatic ecosystems by advancing fisheries and aquatic science and promoting the development of fisheries professionals.  Organizational policies are developed by the membership to

guide the volunteer leadership, executive staff, units, and members on issues affecting aquatic resources, professional ethics, and the environment.  The membership is diverse in terms of geography, experience, and topics of environmental concern.  To properly represent and fully capture the broadest spectrum of knowledge, interest, and concern in such issues, it is important to involve a wide expertise to represent the membership diversity, to the extent possible.

 

B.  Selecting an Issue

 

Once a year, the Chair of the Resource Policy Committee (RPC) will advise all AFS units that proposals for new AFS policy statements should be referred to the Resource Policy Committee.

 

Any formal unit, informal group, or individual member of AFS, hereafter referred to as the sponsor, may propose an issue for study and development into a formal AFS policy statement.

 

An appropriate issue is defined as a matter of current or potential impact on fishery professionals, aquatic resources, or the environment, of which the political, social, and/or technical resolution is important to the AFS membership.  An AFS policy statement is defined as a published document, approved by AFS members, expressing an analysis of the science by the AFS and guidance on policy positions or a prescribed course of action as warranted.  A policy statement also includes a definition and general review of the issue, including the technical reasons for AFS concern.

 

It is desirable to obtain full, careful, and continuing consideration of aquatic resource issues by all AFS units.  Each AFS Division, Chapter, and Section should adopt a mechanism whereby issues relating to aquatic resources, professional ethics, and the environment that are of importance to the unit’s members can be routinely identified. The sponsor should identify and elevate issues to higher levels within AFS for debate,

screening, and possible development of formal policy statements.  A protocol is provided for unit involvement, to better enable AFS to identify issues worthy of policy guidance, and to identify informed members with specific capabilities to help AFS prepare scientifically defensible, objective, and technically accurate positions on specific issues.

 

Issues and support documentation may be solicited at any juncture during the year. Resource Policy Committee (RPC) will periodically query all AFS units regarding their policy development efforts to ensure efforts are not duplicated and to maximize coordination and efficiency of efforts on similar issues.

 

C. Proposing a Policy Issue

 

Once an issue is identified, the sponsor prepares a brief justification of need, and a list of the names and addresses of fishery professionals possessing the interest and knowledge to

 

assist in the preparation of a study report and policy statement.  These materials are forwarded to the Chair of the AFS Resource Policy Committee (RPC).  Newly adopted resolutions on appropriate issues should be referred to the RPC Chair for consideration as an AFS policy statement.  The ultimate decision of the RPC Chair relative to accepting, modifying, or rejecting suggested issue topics for development as formal policy statements will be forwarded to the sponsor.

 

D.  Review of Proposals

 

The RPC Chair will evaluate the appropriateness of proposed issues for development into formal AFS policy statements.  The Chair shall request comment on proposed issues from RPC members and from other AFS members knowledgeable about the issue.  Criteria for evaluation shall include, but need not be limited to, importance to the membership (e.g., recent AFS Resolutions on the issue), potential significance to aquatic resources, overlap with existing AFS policy statements, and present workload of the RPC.

 

After analysis of the proposed issue, the Chair shall make a recommendation to the AFS Governing Board and request direction. The Chair shall then provide the sponsor a decision on further action:

 

1.  On long-term issues for which formal AFS action is considered appropriate, development of an AFS policy statement will be initiated according to the protocol described herein.

 

2.  The RPC, the Governing Board, or both groups may deem a proposal inappropriate for development into an AFS policy statement.  Issues that appear to have value to an AFS unit may be directed to that unit for consideration.  For example, the proposal may be forwarded to the AFS Resolutions Committee for preparation into a Resolution.  The sponsor may appeal unaccepted proposals to the AFS President.  Additional materials or supporting rationale should be included with the appeal.  If the proposal is judged inappropriate by the RPC during the second review, it will not be reconsidered a third time until the next Governing Board meeting.

 

3.  Further information on, or evaluation of, a proposed issue may be required by the RPC Chair to evaluate adequately the need for, and kind of, AFS action.  For example, if the scope of the issue or adequacy of existing AFS policy guidance is unclear, the Chair may request that the sponsor prepare a study report.

 

E.  Study Reports

 

Study reports are intended to provide the basis for evaluating whether formal AFS policy should be developed on an issue, and also to provide a general outline of the intended action considered by the sponsor as appropriate for AFS.  Emphasis in study reports shall be on providing as much information as the RPC Chair deems necessary to determine whether a formal AFS policy is needed.  Hence, such information may be narrow or

broad in scope and may vary in detail.

 

Such reports shall be prepared by a work group formed by the President, in consultation with the RPC Chair and the sponsor.  The Chair may appoint a member of the RPC to represent the Chair on the work group. The Chair shall be responsible for ensuring that the work group includes AFS members knowledgeable on the issue.  Additional AFS

 

members may be requested by the sponsoring unit or the Chair to communicate their views on the issue to the work group and/or review and comment on work products.

 

F.  Drafting Policy Statements

 

If it is determined that a formal AFS policy statement should be prepared for an issue, then the President, in consultation with the RPC Chair and the sponsor, shall appoint a preparer or work group.  The Chair shall be responsible for ensuring that the work group includes AFS members knowledgeable on this issue.  The Chair may appoint a member of the RPC to oversee development of the policy statement to ensure that the statement is prepared and undergoes review according to RPC guidelines.  The RPC member will provide liaison between the Chair and work group during all phases of policy statement development.  If a study report was not required, the Chair may request that the sponsor provide a general outline of the proposed policy prior to establishing the formal work group (preparer).  This outline shall be used to assist the Chair in ensuring the work

group (preparer) adequately understands the process of developing the policy statement.

 

G.  Policy Statement Review

 

During preparation of the draft policy statement, the work group may solicit review of work products at its discretion or in consultation with the RPC liaison to the work group. A “final” draft will be submitted to the RPC Chair by the work group. The Chair shall review the “final” draft and solicit reviews and comments from members of the RPC, other knowledgeable members and all subunits likely to have an interest or expertise related to the subject.  Review should include, but need not be restricted to, technical, editorial, political (internal and external to AFS), social, and economic considerations. Deadlines for completion of reviews will be set by the Chair.

 

The Chair shall ensure that policy statements reflect the broad perspective of the AFS’s international make-up.  The Chair may return comments and reviews to the work group and request revision, or the Chair may revise the draft policy statement unilaterally using guidance provided by reviewers.  Revisions prepared by the work group or Chair should be provided to the sponsor for comment.

 

H. Policy Statement Approval

 

The RPC Chair shall provide recommendations for Governing Board action.  A majority of voting Governing Board members is required for approval to present the draft policy statement to the AFS membership for review and comment.

 

Final drafts approved by the RPC and Governing Board will be posted to the AFS website and notice sent to all members by electronic mail in addition to a notice being published in Fisheries, directing members to review the draft document on the AFS website and send comments to the AFS Executive Director.

 

Prior to posting, authorship of study reports and draft policy statements will be

determined by the Chair, in consultation with the President.  Authorship will be limited to individuals that contribute substantive, written text and all members of the RPC during

the year a policy is adopted. If an individual requests not to be listed as an author, that request should be honored.

 

After at least 60 days from posting, and based on member comments, the RPC Chair and Executive Director may elect to request revision to the statement.  The sponsor shall be advised of any revisions and provided opportunity for comment.

 

Following member input and appropriate revision, policy statements and a recommendation for action from the RPC Chair will be forwarded to the AFS Executive Director and Governing Board for consideration.  A majority approval by voting members of the Governing Board is required to bring the policy statement to the AFS

membership for a vote.  If approved, the policy will be voted on by the membership at the annual business meeting or by electronic means.  A majority approval by the voting members shall be required for adoption of the policy statement.

 

Policy statements not approved by the Governing Board may be revised by the RPC Chair, the work group, or the sponsor, published on the AFS website for review and comment, and resubmitted to the Governing Board.

 

All final policy statements will be footnoted to indicate that AFS policy statements reflect the position of the AFS as a whole, not of individual members or any other institution, organization or agency with which they are affiliated.

 

I. Policy Statement Distribution and Use

 

Newly adopted policy statements and study reports will be published in Fisheries and posted in the Resource Policy pages of the AFS Website, with the date of final acceptance and history of drafts.  An announcement will be posted on the home page highlighting the availability of a new policy statement.  The RPC Chair will provide newly adopted policy statements to all AFS unit heads.  The External Affairs Committee will ensure that all newly adopted policy statements are distributed to all interested entities.

 

J.  Policy Statement Expiration

 

Unless specified otherwise, all policy statements will be reconsidered by the RPC after five years to assure relevancy to current membership concerns. The RPC Chair shall submit recommendations for revision, continuance, or termination of policy statements to the Governing Board and Executive Director for review and approval.  If the Governing Board requests revision, the Chair may solicit comments from the RPC or other AFS members to determine the relevance of a policy statement or to obtain updated information.  The revision may be conducted by the original work group (preparer) or another group appointed for this purpose.  Revised policy statements will be published in on the AFS website and must be approved by the Governing Board and the membership as outlined above.  After 10 years, all policies must be re-approved by the Governing Board.  Policy statements may be rescinded by a majority vote of the Governing Board.

 

K.  Professional Responsibilities and Restrictions

 

AFS members are encouraged to participate in developing Society policy statements. AFS members have responsibility to provide accurate scientific knowledge and professional opinion within their fields of expertise to public and private policy makers and to the general public.

 

The American Fisheries Society holds federal tax exemptions for scientific and educational purposes.  Therefore, candidates for political office may not be endorsed by AFS or its units, and only a portion of AFS revenues, as specified by Title XIII of Public Law 94-455, can be used to influence federal legislation.  Special care must be taken to preserve the Society’s credibility and independence in the development and use of AFS policy statements.

 

Procedures for Submitting, Considering, and Implementing Resolutions

 

A resolution is a formal expression of AFS views.  The purpose of a resolution is to call attention to issues of concern and inform members of matters important to AFS. Resolutions by themselves do not solve problems; however, they place the AFS on record as recognizing the need for action by individual members, government agencies, appropriate legislative or administrative bodies, or by AFS officers.

 

Two types of resolutions may be considered.  INTERNAL RESOLUTIONS concern AFS itself by honoring the achievements of members, recognizing individuals or organizations that have assisted AFS in its work, or addressing AFS operations.  EXTERNAL RESOLUTIONS place AFS views on record regarding matters of significance affecting the fisheries resources of North America or the world.  The following considerations

apply mainly to general resolutions.

 

General External resolutions may be adopted at any organizational level of the Society. Resolutions should be identified clearly as actions of the respective organizational level. Chapters and Divisions usually adopt resolutions concerning local or regional fisheries issues while Sections adopt resolutions on issues pertinent to their area of interest.  It is the policy of AFS to adopt external resolutions only on important issues of broad national or international significance, where an expression of the views of the membership will be effective in accomplishing the desired action.  Regional or local resolutions may be judged as having national significance and be worthy of consideration by AFS so the Resolutions Committee must provide guidance in the format of the resolution and the procedure for advancing it for AFS consideration.

 

External resolutions should first be considered and adopted by Chapters, Sections, or Divisions so the broadest segment of the membership can participate in discussions and debates.  Resolutions should stand the debating process; however, there is often little opportunity for extended debate at the Annual Meeting of the AFS.

 

Chapters, Sections, or Divisions desiring Society action on a resolution must ensure that it carries national or international significance.  Resolutions should be submitted with background information necessary for the evaluation of accuracy and importance of the resolution.  The background information accompanying a resolution should include: contact information for those individuals involved in developing the resolution; a list of potential outside reviewers with their complete addresses, including those who are in favor of the resolution and those thought to be opposed to it;  and contact information, including email addresses, for all individuals who should receive a copy of the approved resolution.

 

Because resolutions become void when the issues they address become moot, it is imperative that the Unit desiring Society action inform the Resolutions Committee Chair of any action which may render the resolution moot.

 

External resolutions must undergo thorough and rigorous review in order to protect the credibility of AFS.  For this reason, a formal review system is recommended.  The Resolutions Committee will seek guidance from committees or units having responsibility for the general subject area with which the resolution is concerned.  Also,

 

individual members having expertise in the subject area will be included in the evaluation process.

 

External resolutions will be examined carefully; the relative merits and demerits will be discussed as well as the methods of implementing resolutions.

 

Upon approval by the Governing Board, resolutions will be posted to the AFS website and notice sent to all members by electronic mail in addition to a notice being published in Fisheries. When feasible, members will be given at least 30 days to review and comment on the document.

 

Final resolutions must be approved by the Governing Board prior to membership vote. Voting may take place electronically or at the Annual Business Meeting.

 

Because of the lack of opportunity for substantive analysis and debate, resolutions coming from the floor for consideration at the Annual Business Meeting are discouraged unless they are of an emergency nature.  The presiding officer may recognize a resolution coming from the floor, provided that it is written in the proper format and copies are available for distribution at the meeting.

 

Approved resolutions will be published in Fisheries and posted in a secure format on the

AFS website, as appropriate.

 

Approved resolutions will be electronically distributed by AFS staff to the list of individuals named in the background information.

 

 

 

Society Advocacy and Unit Procedures

 

Sharing science-based information with the public is a key AFS value.  There are a number of means of sharing information including publication in AFS journals, other scientific publications, workshops, continuing education courses, unit newsletters, resolutions, policy statements, and periodic communications such as letters, action alerts, and media releases.

 

Units should adopt internal procedures to manage development of positions in support of advocacy actions which are suitable for their unit.  The following advocacy guidance (modeled after guidance developed by the Idaho Chapter and the Western Division) provide a good model.

 

“A unit may hold meetings, sponsor symposia, disseminate information, adopt resolutions, and engage in other activities that advance Society objectives and conform to the Society’s Constitution, Rules, and Procedures.  Actions and resolutions of a unit shall be identified only with that unit unless formally adopted by the Society or another unit.” (AFS Constitution Article V #5).

 

A.  AFS Advocacy Guidance

 

Issue Selection Criteria

 

1.  Is the issue pertinent to AFS goals?

 

2.  Will involvement of AFS make a difference?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Steps


3.  Is there membership support?

 

4.  Does AFS have the best available technical information?

 

5.  Have minority opinions been solicited and presented?

 

6.  Does the urgency of the issue warrant action without full membership approval?

 

7.  Is AFS willing to follow through?

 

8.  Do the geographic boundaries and other aspects of the issue make it appropriate for AFS action?

 

 

 

1.  Member, committee, or unit raises concern/issue

 

2.  Unit or committee reviews and recommends action to AFS Governing

Board or Executive Director and Officers

 

3.  AFS Governing Board or Executive Director and Officers reviews appropriate action relative to criteria.  The Governing Board will review the issue if at all possible.  In some situations where it is a rapidly developing policy issue that cannot wait for Governing Board action the Executive Director and Officers may review the proposed action relative to the criteria.  In those instances they will notify the Governing Board of the decision and rationale.  Regardless of who reviews the issue they should ultimately:

 

a.  refer to committee for more information, or b.  solicit wider review of membership, or

c.  take action

 

 

Possible Actions

 

1.  Sends letter requesting action or providing comments

 

2.  Drafts resolution

 

3.  Drafts policy statement

 

4.  Recommends educational forum

 

5.  Denies action with justification

 

6.  Litigation

 

B.  Coordinating Unit Advocacy with AFS

 

As a unit is preparing a draft policy statement or a draft resolution, a plan to share it with other units and other fisheries-related groups should be developed.  For example, in 1992, while the Humboldt Chapter was preparing its position paper, “California Salmonid Stocks at Risk,” the following steps were taken:  a news release was prepared and distributed; Chapter members were advised of the release date via the newsletter; Chapter members were asked to be on the outlook for misinformation in the media and to respond

 

with letters to the editor; the Western Division and Chapters in the Division were contacted to assure coordination; and AFS Headquarters was contacted so the information could be shared with national media contacts, foundations, and Washington- based fisheries conservation groups in a timely fashion.

 

Ultimately, unit positions are sanctioned by AFS and subject to change by decision of the

Governing Board if they are not in keeping with the overall goals of the AFS.

 

Lobbying Information and Guidelines

 

As a result of AFS’s tax-exempt status, AFS must follow certain guidelines set forth by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).  We may provide expert testimony in administrative and legislative hearings; write letters, make telephone calls and visit our legislators to discuss issues for which we can provide science-based information; we can share our information with the public at large and urge that action be taken; and we can lobby for sound fisheries legislation.  UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCE can AFS or any of its units be involved in partisan political campaigns.  This means neither AFS as a whole, nor one of its units, nor a member using their AFS affiliation, can endorse a political candidate.

 

Much of what was once considered lobbying is now considered information sharing under the August 31, 1990 U.S. IRS regulations.  For example:

 

*Urging Congress to develop legislation to better manage large interjurisdictional rivers is not lobbying…. however, urging a single Congressional representative to support HR 1234 or any specific legislation is lobbying.

 

*Generally, communicating with a judicial, executive, or administrative body is not considered lobbying.

 

AFS declares its lobbying expenditures each year when filing its income tax form.  Both direct lobbying and grassroots lobbying are permitted, but they have different financial limits.  Direct lobbying occurs anytime AFS petitions a legislator for action.  Grassroots lobbying occurs when an AFS member asks nonmembers to contact their legislators. With an annual budget of about two million dollars, AFS is permitted to spend a total of

$250,000 on lobbying, of which $62,500 can be grassroots lobbying.  This generous lobbying limit exceeds future foreseeable expenditures.  The limit is high because the IRS expects public non-profit organizations like AFS to speak out on topics where they have expertise and strong commitment.

 

Ideally, AFS would lobby on issues where the Society has developed policy or position statements, or resolutions, but because of time constraints, that is not always possible.  Be sure that whichever avenue is followed (direct or grassroots lobbying), the concurrence of the appropriate unit is obtained.  Notify related units, the AFS Executive Director and the AFS President of the planned lobbying actions to ensure coordination.  As long as you proceed in a professional manner with science-based information your views will be helpful to your audience.

 

Each unit President or their designee must provide the AFS Executive Director with a copy of lobbying materials and an estimate of the costs incurred during the past calendar year by January 30th of each year.  When in doubt as to whether a project is lobbying or not, the project should be forwarded to AFS Headquarters. The AFS staff, in consultation with the AFS tax advisor, can make the determination of the project’s status.

 

Publications Policies

 

A.  Comprehensive Publications Policy

 

The following is a comprehensive AFS publications policy, first adopted in 1987 and later modified according to current practice and to the strategic plans of the Publications Overview Committee. (See also,  www.fisheries.org under Publications.)

 

1.0  Scope and Application of the Policy

 

1.1  The following policy applies to all scientific publications issued by or on behalf of AFS or its units, i.e., those scientific and technical publications bearing the AFS logo or which otherwise can be identified as being sponsored by the Society or any of its units.

 

1.2  Exceptions:  This policy does not apply to directories, bibliographies and other information or library aids, to routine membership communications (e.g., newsletters) of the Society or any unit, or to such periodic reports by units or by standing or special committees as may be required by the Governing Board or by the Executive Committee of any Division.

 

2.0  Editorial Control and Authority

 

2.1  The Executive Director is responsible for Fisheries with respect to the appointment of editors, editorial policy, and content.

 

2.12  The Executive Director and the Director of Publications are responsible for all other publications of the Society to the extent defined in the following sections of this policy.

 

2.12.1  For Journals of the Society, the Director of Publications and the Journal Managing Editor appoints editors for specific journals and oversees and approves the development and implementation of editorial policy and quality control.

 

2.12.2  For unit publications, the Director of Publications reviews and approves the publication proposal with regard to editorial policy and standards and quality control.  The Director of Publications, at the request of the sponsoring unit, may also provide the necessary advice and assistance regarding scheduling, format, and printing.

 

2.12.3  In arriving at a decision to approve book publication, the Director of Publications consults with the Executive Director and the Book Advisory Committee.

 

2.12.4  In disapproving a book publication proposal, the Director of Publications will present the reasons for such action, and will provide, if appropriate, advice on the procedures or actions necessary to merit approval.

 

2.12.5  Appeal of an adverse decision regarding a book may be made to the Governing Board, who may seek additional review and

 

recommendations from the Executive Director, Book Advisory Committee and the POC.

 

2.12.6  For all such book publications, one copy of the final product must be provided to the Executive Director and to the Director of Publications.

 

3.0  Control and Review of Quality and Standards

 

3.1  The Director of Publications, Journal Managing Editor, editors, and associate editors are responsible for establishing and maintaining high levels of quality with respect to scientific content and effective communication in the publication or publications under their control.

 

3.2 For Fisheries, a Chief Science Editor will oversee the science content of the journalSpecifically, the Chief Science Editor will:

1.   Select the Science Editors for the scientific papers submitted to Fisheries.

2.   Make final decisions about accepting or rejecting scientific papers, based on reviews orchestrated by the Science Editors of Fisheries.

3.   Ensure the scientific veracity of the each issue of Fisheries, by perusing

the entire issue for scientific content prior to publication, including science papers, student angles, case studies, and letters to the editor, while the Managing Editor continues to solicit and edit the magazine content such as features, columns, etc.

4.   Help select Science Editors according to POC procedures for the recruitment, review, and retention of AFS journal editors.

5.   Solicit broad general submissions of general interest to the diverse membership of AFS.

6.   Solicit cutting-edge submissions from world leaders in fisheries science.

7.   Mentor and provide guidance to the Science Editors, including acting as vice-chair of their editorial meeting at the AFS Annual Meeting

8.   Attend the meetings of the AFS Journals Editorial Board

9.   Interact with the Managing Editor for Fisheries and Director of Publications.  This includes discussions on the production of the journal, updating instructions to authors, time to publication of issues, and providing feedback related to content, themes, and direction of the scientific and magazine aspects of Fisheries.

 

3.3 All prospective technical contributions to journals or to other volumes will be peer-reviewed.

 

3.32.1  Peer review usually will be conducted by two reviewers, acting independently.

 

3.2.2  For Fisheries, the same policy applies to contributed articles; the Executive Director may waive the peer-review requirement for invited papers or opinion papers.

 

3.43  Reviewers will have their anonymity protected, unless they specifically indicate otherwise.

 

3.54  Reviewers shall not communicate with the authors of manuscripts under

their review except through, or with permission of, the editor, until the manuscript has been accepted for publication.

 

3.65  Reviewers shall not keep, copy, or distribute manuscripts sent to them for evaluation.

 

3.76  The POC will perform periodic reviews of the content, quality, and editorial standards of AFS publications, and will report its findings and recommendations to the Executive Director.

 

3.76.1  The Executive Director may request review by POC of specific publications.

 

4.0  Publication Ethics

 

4.1  Authors are expected to maintain high ethical standards with respect to extending appropriate credit and recognition to their colleagues and fellow contributors.

 

4.2  Dual publication, i.e., the replicate publication of the same data or information, is not allowed.  A full discussion of this issue is found in Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 110:573-574, 1981; the policy enunciated in the referenced editorial is hereby extended to all AFS publications.

 

4.2.1  Authors of manuscripts must state that ideas, data, and conclusions purported therein to be original are neither under simultaneous consideration by another publisher or for another Society publication, nor previously published.

 

4.2.2  All papers – whether published, in press, or under editorial review – that are closely related to the manuscript being submitted, must be documented in the manuscript or in correspondence to the editor.  Reprints or preprints must be made available on request of the editor.

 

4.2.3  Qualifications and exceptions to this policy are given in TAFS

110:573-574, 1981.

 

5.0  New Publications and Publication Services

 

5.1  The Society will develop new publications as needs and opportunities occur. Expansion of the existing list of publications may occur as the result of development of a new publication series, assuming control of existing publications through contractual or other agreements, or by providing other information-transfer or information retrieval services.

 

5.2  All proposals for new journals must be approved by the Governing Board, following recommendation by the Executive Director and consultation with the POC.

 

5.2.1  In specific instances, or for specific types of publications, the

Governing Board may delegate this authority to the Executive Director.

 

5.3  For all such publications, the policies stated herein will apply.

 

5.4  The Executive Director is authorized to act for the Governing Board in matters pertaining to translations of AFS publications to other languages, and obtaining translations into English of appropriate writings in other languages.

 

B.  Publications Policy-Symposium Series

 

(Based on policies approved in 1986).

 

1.  To qualify as a volume in the symposium series, the proposed publication must consist of a set of previously unpublished, thematically related contributions in

one of the fields of fisheries as defined in the “Guide for Authors” of Transactions of the American Fisheries Society, North American Journal of Fisheries Management, North American Journal of Aquaculture, or Journal of Aquatic Animal Health.  The contributions should be the result of a symposium,

workshop, or conference.

 

2.  The volume may be published as either a special feature in a journal or as a stand-alone book publication. In some cases, the proceedings may be published as a special feature in a journal issue and then subsequently as a reprint book

volume.  A decision between these two alternatives lies with the Director of

Publications and is based on the potential market and merit of the proceedings.

 

3.  The proposal to the Journal Managing Editor (if for a journal), or the Director of Publications (if for a book) for inclusion in the symposium series must include:

 

a.  a rigorous statement of the symposium’s purpose and scope;

 

b.  identification of an editor, with a statement of the editor’s commitment

to the project;

 

c.  a statement of editorial procedures and standards to be applied;

 

d.  a schedule for review and final manuscript submittal;

 

e.  assurance that the material will be sufficient for a substantial publication.

 

Whenever possible, the proposal should be presented prior to the symposium, conference, or workshop.

 

4.  The Executive Director and Director of Publications have final responsibility and authority for accepting or rejecting a proceedings proposal.  Appeal of an adverse decision on proposal acceptance may be made to the Executive Director, POC, and then, possibly, to the Governing Board.

 

5.  Responsibilities of the Journal Managing Editor and Director of Publications are to:

 

a.  review the proposal and to correspond with the Symposium Committee or editor regarding editorial standards, page charges, and schedules;

 

b.  exert quality control by performing a substantive review of manuscripts before they are returned to authors;

 

6.  Responsibilities of the Symposium Committee or sponsors are to:

 

a.  develop the proposal in accordance with above;

 

b.  maintain the review schedule;

 

c.  provide for all peer reviews; and

 

d.  maintain AFS standards regarding technical quality control, format, and bibliographic control.

 

7.  In the case of symposium projects sponsored by AFS units and published as books, net profits from the sale of symposium volumes will be divided equally between Society (50%) and the sponsoring unit(s) (50%).  Exceptions to this policy may be negotiated with the Director of Publications and Executive Director.

 

C. Recruitment, Review, and Retention of Editors

 

1.0  Recruitment of Editors

 

1.1  Existing editorial board members will actively recruit successful Associate Editors that have expressed an interest in serving as an Editor or that might be willing to consider serving.

 

1.2  To ensure that there is an opportunity for open recruiting, an advertisement will be placed in Fisheries and communicated through other AFS journals and AFS email distribution lists. The text of that advertisement will be discussed among the Selection Committee (see below), but should contain language similar to:

 

AFS seeks dynamic scientists with the broad perspective on fisheries and high editorial standards to serve as editors of (name of journal). AFS seeks editors who must be committed to fastpaced deadlines

and would be appointed for five year terms. Duties include:

 

1. Deciding on the suitability of contributed items and advising authors on what is needed to make contributions publishable, using the advice of the editorial advisory board and outside reviewers. Editors review material for scientific accuracy as well as for clarity, readability, and interest in the broad fisheries community.

 

2. Soliciting manuscripts to ensure broad coverage.

 

3. Setting the editorial standards for (name of journal) in keeping with the objectives of the publication in accordance with the policies and guidance provided by the Publications Overview Committee and editorial board of the Journal.

 

4. Making recommendations to enhance the vitality of the Journal.

 

To be considered for one of the editor positions send your curriculum vitae with a letter of interest explaining why you want to be the Journal editor via email to (appropriate contact information). To

nominate a highly qualified colleague, send a letter of recommendation to the same email address.

 

1.2.1  When appropriate the announcement should specify the sub‐discipline or focus area (e.g.,marine fisheries, inland fisheries, genetics, etc.) of the new editor.

 

1.3.  The AFS Publications Director or AFS Lead Technical Editor will contact nominated candidates to determine their willingness to serve.

 

1.4.  A Selection Committee will be formed to review candidates. Committee makeup should be the AFS Publications Director (Chair), the current editors for the journal in need of a new editor, and the current chair of the Publications Overview Committee. The Selection Committee will choose a new editor recognizing that interpersonal communication skills and editorial experience are as valuable as a long publication record.

 

2.0 Recruitment of Associate Editors

 

2.1  When an AFS journal needs to replace an Associate Editor, potential candidates should be identified via nominations by the retiring AE, existing AEs and Editors (with those nominations based primarily on a history of quality of reviews provided by candidates), the AFS Publications Director and Lead Technical Editor, and names that have come through the AFS committee volunteer call that is published prior to each annual meeting. In addition, an annual announcement will be included in the June or July issue of Fisheries soliciting interested candidates. Selection of a new AE from that pool of candidates will be done by journal editors (with each editor for a particular journal voting on the potential replacement) in conjunction with the AFS Publications Director and the AFS Lead Technical Editor.

 

3.0 Review and Retention of Editors

 

3.1  All AFS journal editors will meet with the Publications Director each year (preferably at the annual meeting, but phone interviews may be required when meeting attendance is not possible) to discuss work over the previous year. Discussion topics may include major changes in submissions to the journal, rates of acceptance or rejection, times manuscripts spend in review, and comments (if any) from authors or associate editors.

 

3.2  Every five years, the Publications Director should review each journal editor with the explicit goal of making sure that the editor’s performance continues to serve the society well. Issues for discussion may include any concerns that authors or associate editors have raised, the time that

 

manuscripts are on the editor’s desk, and any sudden shifts in acceptance or rejection rates or any significant departures from rates of the other editors of the same journal. If no concerns arise, the editor will be appointed for another five year term. If concerns are raised they should be discussed at this time, and if the AFS Publications Director feels that the problems are too large for the editor to continue, the editor will not be invited back for another term.

 

Continuing Education Courses

 

One of the most important functions of the Society is the maintenance and enhancement of the technical, professional, and administrative knowledge and skills of its members. The AFS Continuing Education Committee (CEC) is charged with that task, and encourages individuals, Chapters, Sections, Divisions and other subunits to develop and propose continuing education activities. These may be approved for Continuing Education Units (CEUs), which are tracked for participants by the American Council on Education (ACE) through a transcription service.  The designation of CEUs ensures a consistent awarding of credit.

 

 

The AFS Continuing Education Committee is responsible for ensuring the quality of AFS CE offerings; thus all courses or activities conducted at Society-level events must be approved by the Committee.   In addition, all courses seeking to award AFS CEUs must be approved by the CEC.

 

 

The AFS Continuing Education Committee is responsible for ensuring the quality of AFS CE offerings; thus all courses or activities sponsored by the Society must be approved by the Committee.  The Committee will review courses sponsored by Sections, Divisions, Chapters or Student Subunits at the request of the Unit.  In addition, all courses that

award AFS CEUs must be approved.

 

 

To obtain approval for a proposed activity, proponents must complete a Course Approval Form, available on the AFS website at  www.fisheries.org or from the Units Coordinator at the AFS Headquarters Office.  Completed forms should be submitted at least 2 months prior to proposed date for the activity to the Units Coordinator or CE Chair.  Forms are sent to the committee for review.  A decision to approve/disapprove along with any recommendations to improve the course and designation of CEUs (if any) is sent to the course contact, usually within three to four weeks.

 

 

When a course has been approved, the Units Coordinator sends the instructor/course contact the forms students must complete to obtain CEU credit. These must be filled out during the CE activity. Course contacts must also collect a CEU registration fee for each student who wants to receive CEUs. The fee is $7.00 per AFS member and $10.00 per nonmember.  Completed forms and one check covering all registration fees must be sent to the Unit Services Coordinator by the course contact after completion of the activity. Course participants who are receiving academic credit are not eligible for CEU credit.

 

Topic-Oriented Meetings (TOMs)

 

Purpose

 

Topic-oriented meetings (TOMs) are specialized meetings that focus on a particular topic of interest to AFS members. They are held periodically in addition to the AFS annual meeting and are typically much smaller in size. They are not meant to replace similar meetings that are sponsored by various AFS units, but in contrast to those meetings are sponsored by the Society, frequently in collaboration with AFS units or external organizations. TOMs serve to advance the AFS Strategic Plan goals of information transfer and outreach, aquatic stewardship, and member services. They help to advance AFS Strategic Plan strategies of increasing visibility, enhancing collaboration with other organizations, providing services for professional development, and providing scientific and technical information.

 

Organizing a TOM

 

A TOM may be organized by an AFS unit or by individual AFS members. The organizers will identify the focus of the proposed TOM and prepare a statement of topics to be addressed. This statement becomes the body of the proposal, which is submitted to the AFS Meetings Oversight Committee for review. The organizers will identify a program committee and work with that committee to establish potential participants, time, meeting location, sponsorship, financial responsibility, and the program plan.

 

Proposal Submission

 

Organizers should submit a proposal with the following sections to the AFS Meetings

 

Oversight Committee:

 

  • A list of organizers and program committee members.

 

  • Discussion of the scientific focus of the conference, topics of proposed sessions, objectives and goals.

 

  • Suggested dates and duration of conference.

 

  • Suggested sites (if the organizers have a preference) and reason for choice.

 

  • Co-sponsors, if any, and their role (financial or non-financial support) in the conference.

 

  • Outline of format and schedule (invited speakers, appropriate number of contributed papers, posters, and time available for discussion).

 

  • Fields of interest, possible participants, a preliminary list of key speakers and possible guests from other societies or abroad.

 

  • A preliminary budget including anticipated income and expenses.
    • Anticipated number of participants and the size of the community from which attendance will be drawn.

 

 

  • Previous or upcoming conferences that will be held on same or similar topics. If within past two years, justification for holding another conference.

 

  • Anticipated conference reports and/or publications.

 

  • Field trip description, if there is going to be one.

 

  • Biography of organizers, including a list of recent publications.

 

Sponsorship and Financial Responsibility

 

TOMs should be a self-supporting program within AFS. AFS will help organizers to identify potential financial sponsors. The AFS will be the principal sponsor of TOMs.

 

For conferences held outside the U.S., a local fisheries equivalent organization should be asked to consider sponsorship to avoid the appearance of unilateral action on another’s turf. This sponsorship may be in-kind as well as financial assistance.

 

Once the proposal is approved by the Meetings Oversight Committee, the organizers will work with AFS to determine an appropriate funding strategy for the conference.

 

The preliminary budget will detail who (AFS or the organizers) is responsible for deficits or excesses, how the conference fees will be set, and who will submit a financial statement to AFS at the conclusion of the conference. When a conference is held outside North America, the host organization will usually handle logistics for the conference and therefore will control the finances. In such cases, the host organization is generally asked to accept financial responsibility for the conference, relieving the organizers of this responsibility. AFS staff will prepare a letter of agreement for these cases.

 

Program and Abstracts

 

If necessary, AFS will assist with the abstracts via online submission and make the abstract database available to the organizers. The organizers and program committee arrange the program and provide the program copy to AFS. The program is for attendees only and is not given or sold to others. The program, with abstracts, is also put on the AFS Web Site.

 

Publicity

 

The conference organizers should prepare announcements and pre-conference publicity to be published in Fisheries and other appropriate outlets, including the AFS website.

 

AFS staff will edit the final copy for publicity pieces. The organizers may provide AFS with a select mailing list of potential participants. Registration and housing information is sent to all who contribute to the conference program or express an interest in attending.

 

Publication

 

The information presented at some TOMs should lend itself to publication, thus the conference organizers should consider carefully the question of publication. All publication proposals are subject to review by the appropriate publication board or editor. AFS has the right of first refusal to publish a product before the organizers can go to a

non-AFS product/publisher.

 

Topic Oriented Hill Seminars

 

 

Purpose:

 

The American Fisheries Society (AFS) is the oldest and most prestigious fisheries professional society in the world. Founded in 1870, AFS now has more than 9,000 members with expertise in all areas of fisheries science and management.

 

The mission of AFS is: a) to promote the conservation, development, and wise use of fisheries; b) further the professional development of its members; and c) to gather and disseminate scientific, technical information about fisheries science and practice through publications, meetings, and other forms of communication to members and the general public. Relying heavily on thorough peer review, AFS has become the preeminent voice of fisheries science, and has therefore become a most trusted voice for communicating that science.

 

AFS proposes to facilitate a series of seminars which will be open to all scientific views and will be designed to further educate the general public, congressional staff and governmental agencies about a wide variety of fisheries related issues. Topics may be proposed by federal agencies or congressional staffers for consideration by AFS.

 

However, the Society will act as the facilitator of these seminars in order to provide an impartial forum for communicating the latest developments on key fisheries issues. Having AFS select speakers and provide the means of communicating the science will assure impartiality and objectivity, especially in the often contentious debates related to the management of fishery resources.

 

Format:

 

Quarterly to biannual seminars on Capitol Hill (during lunch hour or afternoon) to focus on current issues in fisheries and other aquatic resources. The seminars would be delivered using the following format:

 

 

  • One moderator to officiate each seminar. The moderator will open and close the seminar, introduce speakers, and moderate the question and answer session.
  • Each seminar will include presentations from 2-3 speakers. Each presentation will be 10-

20 minutes in length and will focus on the theme of the seminar.

  • After the conclusion of the presentations, the floor will be opened for a question and answer period lasting no more than 20 minutes.

 

Initial List of Suggested Topics:

 

  • Ocean Acidification
  • Marine Aquaculture
  • West Coast Salmon Runs
  • Invasive Species
  • International Fisheries Management and Conservation
  • Diverse Human Interfaces with Fisheries

 

 

Potential collaborators, including related professional societies such as:

 

  • ASLO
  • The Wildlife Society
  • ERF
  • Ecological Society of America

 

Potential contributors, including state and federal agencies such as:

  • US Fish and Wildlife Service
  • US Forest Service
  • NOAA
  • USGS

 

Location:

 

Each seminar will be held in a designated congressional office building depending on availability.

 

Meeting Support

 

1. AFS is a scientific society that regularly seeks funding for its annual meetings from agencies, foundations and other entities. As such, it is not able to provide monetary contributions to support meetings of other scientific organizations.  AFS participation at such meetings may be provided, however, through AFS presence at trade shows as well as through contributions of books, posters, and other products for sale or distribution at the meetings.

 

2. AFS may provide monetary contributions to support the meetings of AFS Units, but those contributions will normally be limited to providing seed money that will be returned to AFS from the revenue of the meeting.   In addition, AFS may provide support to AFS Unit meetings through participation at trade shows as well as through contributions of books, posters, and other products for sale or distribution at the meetings.

 

Procedures for Implementing this Policy:

 

1.  Monies will not be allocated for financial support of non-AFS meetings.  Allocations of seed money to support AFS Unit meetings (money to be returned to AFS will be subject to the normal dollar-value reviews whereby the Executive Director and Officers may approve expenditures up to $5,000; the Management Committee approves requests for expenditures from that level up to $10,000; and Governing Board approval is required for larger requests.

 

2. All organizations or Units requesting seed money to support meetings should submit formal requests electronically to the AFS Executive Director.  This requirement includes requests from both non-AFS and AFS Units for AFS participation at trade shows, etc., and requests from AFS Units seeking seed money support for meetings.  All requests should provide details about the meeting purpose, dates, venue, and type of assistance requested from AFS.  Non-AFS organizations should also provide information to address the criteria noted in #4 below.  All requests submitted to the AFS Executive Director will be discussed with the AFS Officers, who together with the Executive Director will make

a decision.  When seed monies in excess of $5,000 are requested, the decision will be made at the appropriate level (either Management Committee or Governing Board.  The Executive Director will communicate the decision to the requesting Unit or non-AFS organization.

 

3. Decisions to provide active AFS participation at meetings (e.g., at trade shows will, in general, place priority on requests from AFS Units over requests from non-AFS organizations.   The Executive Director may make exceptions.

 

 

4. Criteria that will be considered in providing an AFS presence at non-AFS meetings will include:

 

a. Close tie-in to AFS mission.

b. Must have possible long-term returns to the AFS in terms of membership growth, publication sales, and other tangibles.

 

c. Must encourage reciprocity with AFS meetings (i.e., show willingness to consider a reciprocal contribution to AFS meetings.

d. Other criteria as deemed appropriate by the Executive Director and officers.

 

PROGRAM PLANNING AND FINANCIAL PLANNING

 

 

A.  Definitions

 

1.  Reserve Fund – The goal here is for AFS to have a contingency Reserve Fund equal to one-year operational budget, as defined by the average of the last three years.  This Reserve Fund shall be composed of liquid funds to cover the evolving needs of the Society and invested funds to provide growth of the overall fund.

 

2.  Overhead Rate – The annually calculated rate, approved by the U.S. Government, used to estimate the value of Headquarters administration costs.  In fiscal year 2004, the approved AFS overhead rate was 33.07% of direct costs. (Exceptions to this rate may be granted through negotiations and must be approved by the Executive Director.)

 

3. Special Projects – Refers to any new project not already approved within the

Operational Budget.

 

B.  Financial Policies

 

1.  Operational Budget

 

The policy of the American Fisheries Society (AFS) is to maintain a balanced calendar-year operational budget as a minimum. Preferably however, each year there will be a contribution to the Reserve Fund.  This budget is presented to the Governing Board for approval at its meeting during the preceding year’s Annual Meeting.  Modifications to this budget, based on more recent data, may be presented to the Midyear Governing Board for approval.  In addition, during the Midyear meeting, the Governing Board approves any changes to the membership dues and prices of major products and services.

 

In principle, the cost of AFS products and services should be covered by the revenues accrued from these products and services.

 

2.  Special Projects

 

Support for short-term projects, outside the general operational budget, can be sought provided the following guidelines are observed:

 

a.  Special projects must contribute to achievement of the Society’s major

goals.

 

b.  The Society will charge an overhead rate covering Headquarters costs to all funding proposals except where the granting entity has an explicit policy to prohibit it (in which case we will assess whether direct administrative costs can be included or if the Society wishes to absorb these costs).

 

c.  Special funding can be sought both to expand current approved activities and to initiate new approved activities.  Pass-through projects handled on behalf of AFS units or external parties shall include at least Society administrative costs, i.e., an agreed-upon overhead cost.

 

d.  Any single project, with projected expenses in excess of $100,000 must have Governing Board approval.  No project should be undertaken until a business plan is approved by the Executive Director and the Governing Board.

 

e.  The Executive Director, in concert with the leadership of the committee of reference, may establish a special project, so long as the above guidelines are followed.

 

f.  There will be at least an annual update on special project finances.  This will be part of the Executive Director’s report to the Management (and Budget) Committee.

 

3.  AFS Meetings and Symposia (See also the AFS Meetings Manual)

 

The following principles will help ensure successful meeting planning:

 

a.  Bids to host a meeting are submitted in a competing environment. Hosts may be AFS Chapters, other Society units, or provincial/state agencies.

 

b.  The Society normally advances funds to the host organization (Local

Arrangements Committee) for meeting planning.

 

c.  Costs of a host planning team attending a previous year’s meeting may be paid from meeting revenues–advanced by the Society–if there is no other way for them to attend.

 

d.  The return to the Annual Meeting budget of net trade show from that meeting will be 20% of the net.

e.  At a minimum, the AFS Annual Meeting must break even or better. f.  Complimentary rooms provided by hotels, if any, are used by

Headquarters and host equally.

 

g.  In the event that a unit forgoes a regularly scheduled meeting to host an AFS Annual Meeting, 10% of net revenues will go to the host.  Other units (such as a Division) that choose to co-locate their meeting with the AFS Annual Meeting, may also receive 10% of the net (or some similar amount negotiated and agreed upon in writing).  The rest of the net revenue goes

to the Society.  AFS, at its own choosing, may require an audit of annual meeting income and expense.

 

j.  Because the Society assumes financial liability for its meetings, the Executive Director must approve the meeting’s budget before presentation to the Governing Board for final approval.  Once a budget is thus approved, any significant expenditures beyond what is already approved must gain the approval of the Executive Director.

 

4.  Fiscal Relationships with Units

 

Because the Society is legally responsible for unit obligations, the following policies apply:

 

a.  Unit secretary-treasurers shall send minutes, including member-audited financial reports, to the Executive Director within 30 days after the unit’s annual business meeting.

 

b.  In the unlikely event of Society insolvency, unit assets may be called on to satisfy obligations.

 

c.  Units with a three-year average annual gross income exceeding

$25,000 are required to file an IRS return (form 990) with a copy to the

Society’s Director of Finance and Administration.

 

d.  Checks issued by the Society should be cashed as soon as possible. After 12 months the Society will send a reminder to cash the outstanding check.  If after 18 months the check is not cashed, the Society will inform the recipient that it has stopped payment and the Society will send a check in that amount to the Division, in the case of a divisional entity, or will return that amount to the Society treasury if it is not issued to a divisional entity.

 

5.  Reserve Fund and Dedicated Funds:

 

These funds are managed separately from general operational and special project budgets.

 

a.  In 2004, a Reserve Fund policy was set to have a goal of one-year operational budget (using the previous 3 years average).

 

b.  In 1988, A Publications Endowment Fund was established by a fee of $2.00 per book sold. The purpose of this fund is to support the publication of Society and unit publications for which outside support is not available.

 

c.  The J. Frances Allen Scholarship Fund is a dedicated fund created for the purpose of providing at least one $2,500 scholarship annually to a deserving woman doctoral candidate.  The fund balance is currently sufficient to achieve this objective without invading the principal.

 

d.  The Skinner Memorial Fund is a dedicated fund created for the purpose of providing travel scholarships for students to come to the AFS Annual Meeting.  The fund currently supports travel without invasion of the principal.

 

e.  The Snieszko Fund is a dedicated fund created in 1988 with funds from a bequest from Stanislaus and Julia Snieszko for the benefit of the AFS Fish Health Section.

 

f.  The Carl R. Sullivan Fisheries Conservation Award Endowment is a dedicated fund created in 1991 to support the annual purchase of the “Sully” award.  The interest may be expended for the award but the principal may not be invaded.

 

g.  The Carl R. Sullivan Memorial Endowment is a dedicated fund to support AFS membership dues for non-North American fisheries

 

scientists.  Providing funding is adequate, each “scholarship” member is to receive an AFS peer-reviewed journal of choice.

 

C.  Possible Financial Pitfalls

 

When you plan special projects, it is useful to state potential pitfalls,

 

1.  New Missions.  The Society must hold completely to its defined mission and objectives in order to preserve and enhance its impact.  The more effective the Society becomes, the more tempting it will be for members to try to use the organization and its influence for their own purposes, drawing it into issues, battles, and projects that do not contribute to achievement of the mission.

 

2.   Overex tension  (“Mi ssi on  creep ”)  .  Attempting to respond to the never-ending list of important activities that do fall within our mission is also a potential pitfall. Even if we can avoid becoming involved in the individual priorities represented

by our units and members, we could still get into serious trouble by trying to respond to all the appropriate ideas that alert members and others will urge on us.

 

3.  Fragmentation.  In addition to getting ourselves badly overextended, we could be inclined to try to do so many different things at once that we will not do any of them well, will lack focus, and will have limited capacity to accomplish the big things.

 

Finally, over caution in avoiding pitfalls could lead to lack of action and failure to realize opportunities.

 

(from a 1992  Executive Committee report)

 

 

 

Investment Objectives and Guidelines

 

Introduction

 

These Statements of Investment Policies and Objectives set forth AFS’s plan for effectively managing and controlling the Society’s investments and fixed assets. For policy purposes, these tangible assets are divided into three categories: Long-Term Investments, Short-Term Money, and Fixed Assets for each of which there is a separate statement.

 

The statements attempt (1) to identify appropriate risk postures, (2) to state the expectations and objectives for all categories of assets, (3) provide asset allocation guidelines that are consistent with the risks and the objectives, and (4) establish criteria for monitoring and evaluating the performance results of the investment.

 

Statement of Investment Policy and Objectives: Long-Term Investments

 

This Statement of Investment Policy and Objectives governs the management of the American Fishery Society’s investment assets categorized as Long-Term Investments. The investments in this category include both Donor Restricted Funds and Governing-Board Designated Reserves and other funds. This Statement shall remain in effect until modified as conditions warrant by the Governing Board.

 

The responsibility for ensuring the implementation of the policy and guidelines set forth in this statement rests with the Executive Director, Investment Committee and Management Committee.

 

A.  Financial and Investment Objectives

 

The Long-Term Investments have the dual purpose of providing a reserve for the support of the operations and continued development of AFS in financially stressed circumstances and so long as the identified requirements for reserves are met, serving as an endowment that provides

current short-term funding for special activities identified by the Governing Board.

 

Implicit in this objective is the financial goal of preserving and enhancing the inflation adjusted purchasing power of the Long-Term Investments.

 

 

 

The objective of the Long-Term Investments is to attain an average annual real total return (net of investment management fees) of at least 5.0% as measured over rolling five-year periods.

 

This objective should be achievable within risk levels defined by this policy.

 

B.  Spending Policy

 

The Investment Committee working with the Executive Director will currently specify the amount that may be drawn annually for endowment spending from the Long-Term Investment. However, the actual transfer of any funds from the Long-Term Investment to short-term investments requires the authorization of the President.

 

C.  Investment Management Structure

 

The Executive Director, with the advice of the Investment Committee, is authorized to place the Long-Term Investment in mutual funds. Such mutual funds will have a 5-year track record well above the average for mutual funds of that type and no more than 1/4 of the Long-Term Investment will be in any single mutual fund or mutual fund family except that a larger fraction may be in an index fund based on the Standard and Poor’s index or similar broad indicator of the market. Management of the Long-Term Investment may also be delegated to investment managers who are given full discretionary powers under the guidelines provided in this policy and supplemented by instructions from the Investment Committee through the Executive Director. Such investment managers will be appointed by the Governing Board with the advice

of the Committee and the ED.

 

The Committee will report at each meeting of the Council the performance of the Long-Term Investment and its managers. It is understood that when Long-Term Investment funds are invested in mutual funds or commingled funds, the Committee will accept the guidelines of the fund(s) and managers chosen.

 

D.  Portfolio Composition and Asset Allocation

 

To achieve its investment objective, the Long-Term Investment Fund will be divided into two major sub-components: An “Equity Fund” and a “Fixed Income Fund.” The purpose of dividing these investments in this manner is to ensure that the overall asset allocation between these two

 

asset classes remains under the regular scrutiny of the Investment Committee (and ED) and is not allowed to become the residual of separate manager decisions.

 

The Long-Term Investment will be diversified both by asset class and within asset classes (e.g., within equities by economic sector, industry, quality, and size). Moreover, the Equity Fund will be placed with managers who have distinct and different investment philosophies. The purpose of such diversification is to provide reasonable assurance that no single security, class of securities, or specific investment style will have a disproportionate impact on the Long-Term Investment’s aggregate results.

 

The purpose of the Equity Fund is to provide a total return that will provide for growth in principal and current income to support any desired spending requirements while increasing the purchasing power of the Long-Term Investment’s assets. AFS recognizes that the pursuit of these long-term objectives entails the assumption of market variability and risk.

 

The Equity Fund should normally represent 80% of total Long-Term Investment assets at market value. Although the actual percentage weighting in the Equity Fund will vary with market conditions, it will be closely monitored whenever levels exceed 90% or fall below 70%. Should the allocation move outside of these ranges, additional funds will be transferred as needed to bring the overall asset mix back within the policy range.

 

The purpose of the Fixed Income Fund is to reduce the overall volatility of the Long-Term Investment returns and to provide a hedge against the effects of a prolonged economic contraction. The Fixed Income Fund should normally represent 20% of the total Long-Term Investment assets at market value. Although the actual percentage will fluctuate with market conditions, levels below 10% and above 30% will be closely monitored by the Investment Committee.

 

In general, the Fixed Income portfolio will be diversified among different sectors of the fixed income market. Up to 15% of the Fixed Income Fund may be invested in quality ratings of below BBB. However, the overall average quality must be “AA.” With the exception of obligations of the U.S. Government and its agencies, no purchase will be made that will cause more than 5% of the Fixed Income Fund to be invested in the securities of any one issuer. The Fixed Income Fund may be invested in actively managed mutual funds to the extent that the Investment Committee deems appropriate.

 

Additions to principal will be allocated to investment managers by the Investment Committee (through the ED) following the general rule that new cash will be used to rebalance the total Long-Term Investment in the direction of the 80%/20% equity/fixed income ratio. It is anticipated that shifting assets among managers will occur infrequently.

 

E.  Performance Objectives

 

In addition to the overall objective of a real return of 5% over 5 year rolling period the following performance objectives are expected to be met by the fund and its individual components.

 

The total fund is expected to outperform the performance of a blended benchmark comprised of the returns of the following investable indexes in the weightings indicated: Wilshire 5000 80% Lehman Brothers Aggregate Bond Index 20%.

 

Equity managers are evaluated versus appropriate passive, fully-invested benchmarks regardless of the level of cash assets held by the investment manager. Assets held by equity managers are thus, considered 100% equity investments for purposes of asset allocation targets, and performance comparisons. The objectives of the Fixed Income Fund are to outperform (net of fees) the Lehman Brothers Aggregate Bond index.

 

F.  Risk Tolerance

 

Risks taken should be generally limited to those attendant to fluctuation of the market in the form of assets employed.

 

G. Monitoring of Objectives and Results

 

Both the mutual fund accounts and the individually managed portfolios will be monitored for consistency in each manager’s investment philosophy, return relative to objectives, investment risk as measured by asset concentrations, exposure to extreme economic conditions, and market volatility.

 

The Investment Committee will regularly review managers in order to confirm that the factors underlying performance expectations remain in place. They may request that the investment manager(s) be present in person or by phone at periodic meetings to present their portfolios and results to the Investment Committee.

 

All objectives and policies are in effect until modified by the Management Committee and approved by the Governing Board. If at any time a member of the Governing Board, Management Committee, Investment Committee, Executive Director or investment manager believes that an established policy or guideline inhibits the investment performance of the Long- Term Investment, it is that individual’s responsibility to clearly communicate this view to the Chair of the Investment Committee and ED.

 

Statement of Investment Policy and Objectives: Short-term Money

 

A.  Definition of Category

 

Short-Term Money includes all Cash and Cash Management Accounts. These are expected to equal or slightly exceed Current Liabilities minus Current Assets plus anticipated needs for capital over the next 12 months. Responsibility for management of the Short-Term Money is delegated to the Executive Director. The Executive Director may retain outside management for these funds.

 

B.  Purpose of Funds

 

A large fraction of these funds are required to pay the Society’s bills over each 12-month period.

 

The amount in this category of funds varies through the year as the Society’s income is seasonal and concentrated in the November-January time frame, whereas the Society’s expenses are more evenly spread throughout the year.

 

C. Risk Tolerance

 

This operating cash must be completely liquid and not subject to significant market (interest rate/duration) risk or credit quality risk. The remaining Short-Term Money is required to cover liabilities that may arise for prepaid orders, subscriptions, and employee benefits. Likewise, these funds should not be exposed to market or credit risk.

 

D.  Return Objectives

 

The objective is to maximize return consistent with insulation from capital loss. The return on

the first $1 million of such funds should compare favorably with widely used money market fund averages. The surplus over the first $1 million will be measured against the return on U.S. government notes of 2 years maturity.

 

E.  Authorized Securities

 

Types of securities authorized for Short-Term Money include: bank accounts including checking, savings and time deposit accounts, U.S. Treasury bills and other short-term government paper, commercial paper, and other cash equivalents with an average rating of AA and a maturity of

two years. The estimated requirements for the operating cash portion are to be kept in bank accounts or invested in cash equivalent securities.

 

F.  Monitoring of Objectives and Results

 

Individually managed portfolios will be monitored for consistency in each manager’s investment philosophy, return relative to objectives, investment risk as measured by asset concentrations, exposure to extreme economic conditions, and market volatility. Portfolios will be reviewed by the Investment Committee on a twice yearly basis.

 

The Investment Committee may request that the investment manager(s) be present at periodic meetings to present their portfolios and results to the Committee. In either case, the Committee will regularly review managers in order to confirm that the factors underlying performance expectations remain in place.

 

All objectives and policies are in effect until modified by the Management Committee and approved by the Governing Board. They will be reviewed at least annually for their continued appropriateness. If at any time a member of the Governing Board, Management Committee, Investment Committee, Executive Director or investment manager believes that an established policy or guideline inhibits the Short-Term Money investment performance, it is that individual’s responsibility to clearly communicate this view to the Chair of the Investment Committee.

 

Statement of Investment Policy and Objectives: Fixed Assets

 

A.  Definition of Category

 

Fixed Assets include Current Fixed Assets (Land, Building and Leasehold Improvements, and Equipment) and the related borrowing and lease purchases, all included in this package for purposes of policy and management. Responsibility for management of the Fixed Assets is delegated to the Executive Director.

 

B.  Monitoring the Funds

 

The fixed assets are never expected to be made liquid. Under no circumstances is the amount of the non-liquid reserves to go below zero nor is it expected to reduce markedly in any given year.

 

Transfers between Short-Term Money and Long-Term Investments

 

Transfer of any money from Long-Term Investments to Short-Term Money may be made only on authorization by the President and ED. A schedule of Long-Term Investments will be prepared in advance of each Governing Board meeting for the Investment Committee.

 

The Investment Committee will review the operating cash projections and whenever there appears to be more than a nominal amount above projected requirements in Short-Term Money will transfer the appropriate amount to Long-Term Investments.

 

Planned Giving Program

 

Goal:

 

  • To position the American Fisheries Society for launching a planned giving initiative for the future of the Society.

 

 

 

Process:

 

  • To remind Society members of the importance of making a will;

 

  • To introduce the idea of making a planned gift to the Society;

 

  • To identify a group of AFS members who might make a bequest to AFS; and

 

  • To continue to cultivate any interest expressed or commitment made by members to remember AFS in their will.

 

 

 

Action Plan:

 

  • Identify a member group to spearhead this effort.  The Past Presidents’ Advisory

Council is committed to lead this effort with support from AFS staff.

 

 

 

  • Identify previous and future planned gifts.  Prepare a list of donors who have made a planned gift to AFS in the past.  Also prepare a list of those members who have notified AFS of their intention to make a planned gift.

 

 

 

  • Identify prospects.  Review all donor files for planned giving prospects; examples are

30-year and 40-year members, Golden Members, Life Members, Past Presidents, and donors of large gifts.  Compile a list of prospects and provide this list to the Past Presidents’ Advisory Council for their review and additions.

 

 

 

  • Identify for each possible donor a personal member contact who would spearhead the effort personally.

 

 

 

  • Write an article on planned giving.  In 1989, AFS Executive Director Carl Sullivan wrote a nice article for Fisheries on bequests to AFS.  A similar article should be prepared as a kickoff event to the planned giving program.  It could be presented under the name of the Chair of the Past Presidents’ Advisory Council or the key person spearheading the planned giving effort for the PPAC.  When published, there should be a response card included in Fisheries for the convenience of members who wish to respond or seek additional information.  Reprints of the article should be distributed at AFS annual meetings, unit events, symposia, AFS trade shows and similar gatherings of members.

 

 

 

  • Create a bequest recognition group. This concept will be introduced in the Fisheries article on planned giving.  Past Presidents, Officers, and/or Governing Board Members could be invited to join as charter members of this group; this group may be helpful in identifying, evaluating, and cultivating prospective donors.

 

 

 

  • Design a brochure with tear-off reply card.   This brochure would be included in the first mailing to prospects after the appearance of the article on bequests in Fisheries; this brochure could accompany reprints of the article in future distributions.

 

 

 

  • Develop letters and enclosures for use in mailings to prospects:

 

1)  Prepare letters on AFS letterhead from the Chair of the Past Presidents’ Advisory Council or the key person spearheading the planned giving effort for the PPAC to introduce the program and to encourage members to request more information.

 

a)  Prepare an enclosure such as a reply card upon which the member may insert his/her name, address, telephone and check off appropriate boxes to indicate interest, to request information, or to make a commitment.

 

b)  Enclose a confidential, postage-paid reply envelope in mailings.

 

2) Create a Thank-you letter when a planned gift is made; acknowledge the gift in the

AFS annual report, with permission of donor.

 

3) Create a Follow-up letter when no response has been obtained by a certain date.

 

 

 

  • Create ads on planned giving.  These should be small, bold ads for insertion in

Fisheries to encourage members to remember AFS in their will.

 

 

 

  • Schedule an annual mailing.  This mailing of planned giving materials should coincide with a brief ad or a promotional article in Fisheries.

 

 

 

  • Monitor results.  The AFS staff and the Past Presidents’ Advisory Council will monitor results to determine appropriate follow up with prospects (information response, personal visits by volunteers, and other forms of interaction).

 

 

 

  • Maintain contact with bequest donors.  The Past Presidents’ Advisory Council and AFS staff will stay in touch with bequest donors, continuing to provide them with information on AFS so that the donor is made to feel appreciated and valued for his/her commitment.

 

Result:

 

The Society will have identified, approached, and cultivated those members most likely to be interested in making a planned gift to the Society and will have uncovered future sources of revenue.  This effort also may result in more life income gifts from the targeted group of AFS members.

 

New Initiatives

 

 

Purpose:

AFS New Initiatives are strategic projects that enhance member and unit services while

advancing the major goals and mission of the AFS.  These projects may be one-time activities or may entail the creation of new services and activities that later become routine operations (e.g., leadership development grants, new journals).

 

Background:

In 2005, the Enhancement of AFS Value Committee was appointed to develop recommendations

for AFS services and activities that could be accomplished under the increased financial security of AFS.  Under the guidance of the committee, the AFS Governing Board identified services and activities to enhance member services, aquatic stewardship, and information transfer and outreach.  Three projects were selected for further pursuit:

  • The development of an open-access, electronic journal dedicated to marine and coastal fisheries,
  • The support of AFS leadership development (through a grant for Governing Board

members’ travel to the mid-year meeting), and

  • The enhancement of public outreach by expanding the scope of AFS staff (through the hiring of a policy and public outreach coordinator in Bethesda).

These initiatives have now become routine operations and will not be affected by subsequent considerations of new initiatives.

 

General Overview:

New initiatives are focused on either membership services or unit services, but share the strategic

goal of maintaining and enhancing AFS relevancy.  Initiatives are identified from a variety of sources; some initiatives may generate funds, some will be revenue neutral, and some will entail continued costs.  The Executive Director in concurrence with the AFS Officers will identify the total amount of funds available to support each type of new initiative – i.e., funds available to support new unit services/activities, and total funds available to support new membership services/activities.

 

Unit services:  Initiatives for unit services provide seed money for activities or services to assist units in reaching their strategic goals and in carrying out their business.  Seed money will be returned to AFS after a period of time not less than 1 year, but not to exceed 3 years after completion of the project or activity.  Requests for funds to support meetings should adhere to the AFS policy on Support for Meetings (Section 12.11, under Section 12, Operational Policies and Procedures).

 

Membership services:  Ideas for initiatives for membership services may come from various sources, including focus groups, membership surveys, units, individual members, and AFS staff. These needs should be activities or services that are not available elsewhere.  Providing services to meet these needs becomes an investment in our future, with the desired outcome being the retention and recruitment of young professionals and students to AFS, and maintaining our relevancy as a professional association.

 

 

Operational Guidelines, Unit Services:

The purpose of this section is to establish guidelines for the identification, selection, and

implementation of new initiatives to support unit services.

 

Application submission process

The Executive Director will send the application and guidelines for preparation and submission of applications to unit Presidents (Division Presidents may forward material to Chapter Presidents).  The Executive Director will also suggest an upper limit for individual requests.

 

Successful applications will include a brief narrative describing the strategic goal of the initiative, the need for the initiative, how the success of the initiative will be measured, the amount requested, and a description of how and when funds will be generated to return the seed money.  Units submitting single requests that encompass multiple tasks will be asked to prioritize tasks in the event that a full request cannot be granted.

 

To ensure equal consideration, applications will be due January 5 (or the first business day after the 5th), with funding outcome to be determined no later than 15 February.  This will avoid units seeking funds for the same initiative at the mid-year Governing Board meeting (in the form of a motion with budget implications).

 

Completed applications will be submitted electronically to the President with copies to the

Executive Director on January 5th.

 

Selection criteria

The Governing Board will screen the applications and make the awards; late applications will not be considered.  The screening process is general, seeking to ensure that seed moneys will be repaid and that the activities proposed are consistent with the AFS mission. Screening and Governing Board voting may occur electronically.  Applications approved for funding will be those that make a strong case for the unit’s ability to recover funds.  All approved applications will be funded.  However, if the total funds requested across units exceed that available, then approved awards will be funded to ensure representation across Divisions and among Sections, and to facilitate funding of initiatives from units that have not received prior funding.

 

Reporting requirements

Units funded through this process are required to submit progress reports to the Governing Board in time for the mid-year and annual meetings of the Board.  Progress reports should be brief and include a statement on outcomes, challenges, and progress towards returning funds.

 

A list of funded initiatives will be posted to the AFS web site by AFS staff.

 

Operational Guidelines, Membership Services:

The purpose of this section is to establish guidelines for the identification, selection, and

implementation of new initiatives to support membership services.  In general, the Executive Director develops business plans for 3-5 initiatives deemed to be of highest priority, and the Governing Board selects initiatives to pursue, depending on costs and other factors.

 

 

Ideas for initiatives to support membership services may come from various sources, including membership surveys and focus groups (these ideas would be identified in reports of the committees responsible for such surveys), AFS units, individual members, and AFS staff.  The Management committee will have access to reports and findings of survey committees and may elect to propose ideas from these sources.

 

Proposal submission process

In early October, the Executive Director sends a call for proposal for new initiatives to support membership services to the Governing Board, the general membership, and AFS staff.  The call includes guidelines and deadlines for submission (January 5th).  Guidelines for proposing new initiatives for membership services are established by the Governing Board.

 

Initiatives should include a brief narrative describing the strategic goal of the initiative, the need for the initiative, and a description of how the initiative benefits AFS members.  Other criteria may be established by the Management Committee.  Initiatives should state if they are predicted to be a cost burden, budget neutral, or budget enhancing.

 

Proposals for new initiatives are submitted by January 5th (or the first business day after the 5th) to the New Initiatives Coordinator, who is a member of the Management Committee, appointed for a one-year term by the President in consultation with the Management Committee.

 

The Coordinator considers proposals and may request clarification or merging of 2 or more initiatives that are similar.  The Coordinator prepares a list of proposed initiatives and presents the list, along with accompanying proposals, to the AFS Officers and ED, no less than 3 weeks prior to the mid-year meeting.

 

Selection criteria

The Governing Board in concurrence with the Executive Director will select no more than 5 initiatives for further consideration.  Selection may be accomplished through email voting, with each voting member of the Board selecting (and ranking) his/her top 3 priorities.  Criteria for selection include (1) alignment with strategic goals and mission of the AFS, (2) cost considerations, and (3) ability to evaluate success of the outcome.  Higher priority may be placed on initiatives that address the retention and recruitment of young professionals and students to AFS, and to those that focus on maintaining our relevancy as a professional association.  The Board votes are tallied and the overall top 5 candidates are selected for business plan development.  The outcome will be communicated to the Governing Board at the mid-year meeting.

 

The Executive Director, working with the originator(s) of the proposals, will develop business plans for selected initiatives and present the plans to the Governing Board at the following mid- year meeting.  Typically, business plans will require 6 months to 1 year to develop.

 

 

At the mid-year meeting, the Governing Board will review the business plans, and as warranted, select initiatives to support based on available funds.  Business plans for new initiatives should be examined in light of the long-term financial status of AFS.  The Governing Board may elect

 

to partially fund an initiative if existing funds are insufficient (e.g., an initiative may require 2 or

3 years of funding to be fully funded).  In the case of initiatives requiring more than 1 year of funding, the Executive Director will include budget costs for years 2+ in the proposed AFS budget.  To ensure the financial well-being of AFS, it is desirable to select at least 1 new initiative that will generate revenue (rather than being revenue-neutral or revenue-negative). Unfunded initiatives may be resubmitted in later years for consideration.

 

Disaster Relief

 

Organization

 

The American Fisheries Society (AFS) disaster relief will focus on professional needs of Society members.  Other agencies and institutions have responsibility for humanitarian needs. This does not mean that AFS is not sensitive to personal needs of members.  To the contrary, addressing professional need is fundamental to addressing human need because during times of disaster, professional capacity is critical to restoring order and generating outreach in communities as well as generating/reestablishing definition in the lives of individual persons.

 

The organizational structure of AFS will be utilized in disaster response.  The President of the AFS Division within which the disaster occurs will have the principal leadership role in terms of (1) recommending to the Society President that disaster be declared, and (2) activating and directing disaster relief within the Division.  Tasks can be assigned by the Division President but the Division President has ultimate authority and responsibility.  Chapter communications to the Division President will come through the Chapter President or a person designated by the Chapter President unless the Chapter President has been impacted by the disaster to the extent that he/she cannot function in this capacity.  In such a case, the Division President, in

consultation with the Society President, will appoint a chapter contact person (preferably from the chapter membership).

 

Operations

 

The most important activity immediately following the disaster is to locate AFS members in the impacted area.  This is essential in order to keep them connected and in communication with the professional support system provided by the AFS.  This initial contact will clearly communicate what AFS services are available and how they can be obtained.  It will also provide each member with the contact information for their Chapter President or other designated

disaster relief coordinator for the Chapter.

 

For this activity to function, it is essential that membership rosters be kept up to date in the Chapter, Division and Society records.  These records should include persons who hold Society and Chapter memberships, those who hold only Society memberships, and those who hold only Chapter memberships.  Without up-to date-rosters, there can be no certainty that all members have been accounted for following a disaster.

 

Displaced members should make every effort to contact their Chapter President.  If this cannot be done, then displaced members should contact the Society Office.  The Society Office will then contact the Division President who in turn will contact the Chapter President or other designated contact for the Chapter.

 

Establish a centralized distribution and control center outside of the impacted area.  This center will serve as the operational hub for communications and for the coordination of relief activities, including identification of need and availability of materials.  This center will be staffed by one paid Coordinator, selected by the Division President and approved by Division Officers.  The Coordinator’s job is to maintain operations, communications, and records for disaster relief. The Coordinator will report directly to the Division President.  It is the responsibility of the Division President to determine the flow of communication between

 

Coordinator, Chapters, and Division.  The Society through the Division should be prepared to employ the coordinator up to 2 years following the disaster.

 

It should be noted that the Coordinator could handle multiple disasters in the same division were it necessary to do so.  However, if there were a new disaster in a different division, it is recommended that a new Coordinator be hired, if the AFS is financially able to do so.

 

Establish a relief disbursement center on the edge of the impacted area.  This enables relief supplies from outside the impacted area to get to (not in) the area.  Although persons from outside the impacted area may have good intentions regarding disbursement of relief supplies, they can encounter local challenges due to their unfamiliarity with the area and current situation. It is best for AFS members staffing the relief disbursement center to take responsibility for transport and disbursement of relief supplies into the impacted area.  The relief disbursement center is staffed by volunteers, not paid staff.  However, the Coordinator will coordinate donated items from the donor(s) to the relief disbursement center and from the center to the intended recipient(s).

 

Fiscal Responsibilities of Disaster Relief

 

All financial donations toward disaster relief will be made to the Society Disaster Relief Donation Fund.  Any donations received by the affected Division will be forwarded to the Society Disaster Relief Donation Fund.  The Society will periodically update the affected Division on donations that have been received in order for the affected Division to make best use of the monies.

 

The affected Division will set up a separate bank account to address disaster relief and will be the sole distributor of the Division’s disaster relief distribution funds to affected AFS members.  The Division Treasurer will manage the distribution of monies as well as maintain and manage the account.  The Division EXCOM or an individual or group appointed by the Division President will prepare a budget for anticipated distribution of funds.  As needed, the Division will request transfer of funds from the Society Disaster Relief Donation Fund to the Division.  The affected Division will be responsible for providing the Society Governing Board and the AFS Executive Director with financial statements (income/expenses/balance) periodically and upon request.  When preparing its annual income tax return, the Division must account for funds received from the Society Disaster Relief Donation Fund as well as expenses

to the Division’s disaster relief distribution account because these actions are Division functions.

 

Response Framework

 

  • · The AFS Disaster Relief Website will be maintained on the Division website for the affected area with a link from the Society Website.

 

  • · The Society will hold in reserve a designated amount for disaster relief.

 

Immediately Following an Event:

 

  • · Division President will immediately contact the Chapter President(s) in the impacted area. The Chapter President(s) will make recommendations to the Division President regarding an AFS declaration of disaster.  If the Chapter President(s) cannot be contacted, the Division President will make contact with another elected Chapter representative.
  • · Chapter President(s) or other designated chapter representative(s) will immediately begin locating members in their respective chapter(s) and checking off members using current rosters.  These check-offs will be forwarded periodically to the Division President who in turn will forward them to the Society Office. Additionally, Chapter President(s) will collaborate with the Society office to identify and locate Society members in the region who are not Chapter members.

 

 

  • · Division President will immediately contact the Society President and request (1) a disaster declaration, (2) permission to establish a distribution and control center, (3) permission to seek and hire a coordinator for the distribution and control center and (4) release of one third of the Society’s budgeted disaster relief funds to the Division.

 

  • · Society President will call an emergency meeting of Society Officers and the AFS Executive Director to determine if a disaster declaration is warranted, and if so will request approval to release disaster relief funds, establish a distribution and control center, and hire a coordinator for the center.

 

  • · Following these actions by the Society Officers, the Society Governing Board will be notified.

 

  • · Following declaration of disaster by Society President, the Division President will establish liaison with the impacted Chapter(s) via the respective Chapter President(s) or designated Chapter representative to identify immediate professional needs of impacted AFS members and authorize the Division Treasurer to establish an independent account for the Division’s disaster relief distribution funds.

 

Recommended Outreach Schedule:

 

  • · Within 2 weeks of the disaster: the Society and Division disaster relief funding mechanisms will be in place.

 

  • · Within 2 weeks of the disaster: all AFS Society members will receive notification that disaster relief has been activated and provided information regarding mechanisms for disaster relief donations.

 

  • · Within 2 months of the disaster: the distribution and control center will be staffed and operational.

 

  • · Within 2 months of the disaster: all impacted AFS members will be individually identified, located, and if possible, contacted by their Chapter representative(s) to advise them of relief support coming from AFS (i.e., complimentary memberships, subscriptions, availability of scholarships to AFS meetings, and the Division’s disaster relief distribution and control center).

 

  • · Within 6 months of the disaster: impacted AFS members receiving scholarships to AFS Meetings will be notified of their awards.

 

  • · Subject to the availability of funds (e.g., corporate sponsors, donations), AFS should consider awarding grants to members and their affiliated institutions in the impacted region to help support completion of thesis and dissertation projects impacted by the disaster.

 

Reference

 

Heitman, J. F., D. C. Jackson, R. L. Curry, and D. Pender. (accepted for publication).

Development and implementation of the American  Fisheries Society Hurricane Relief Initiative.  In K. Mclaughlin, editor.                               Proceedings of the AFS-Sea Grant Symposium: mitigating impacts of natural hazards on fishery ecosystems.  American Fisheries Society

2007 Annual Meeting.  San Francisco, California.

 

Fisheries Conservation Foundation

 

Memorandum of Understanding between the

Fisheries Conservation Foundation and the American Fisheries Society

 

1. Purpose

 

The Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is made and entered between the Fisheries Conservation Foundation (FCF) and the American Fisheries Society (AFS).  Both signatories of this MOU are referred to as “Partners.”

 

The purpose of this MOU is to designate a collaborative relationship between FCF and AFS

in which the partners assist each other in carrying out their respective missions.

 

 

 

II. Background

 

FCF, founded in 2003, is a science-based conservation-oriented foundation representing fisheries scientists.  FCF promotes public awareness of fisheries resource issues and relevant scientific research, as well as the enlightened management of fisheries resources for their optimum use and enjoyment by the public.

 

AFS, founded in 1870, is the oldest and largest professional society in the world representing fisheries and aquatic scientists.  AFS seeks to improve the conservation and sustainability of fishery resources and aquatic ecosystems by advancing fisheries and aquatic sciences and promoting the development of fisheries professionals.

 

III. Mutual Benefits

 

It is mutually beneficial for FCF and AFS to work together to:

 

1.   Increase scientific knowledge on important fisheries resource issues;

2.   Communicate science-based information to relevant decision makers;

3.   Increase public awareness of fisheries resource conservation issues;

3.   Identify strategies to assure that resource management is based on sound science;

4.   Develop support to help implement such strategies among relevant constituencies and the general public.

 

IV Responsibilities

 

FCF and AFS will together work to:

 

Encourage fisheries scientists and managers to conduct new education/outreach programs designed to distribute scientific findings to decision makers and the public;

 

Organize meetings, workshops, and other events for scientists, non-governmental organizations, resources managers, and policy makers to develop plans and policy considerations for fisheries resource conservation efforts.

 

Develop tools to communicate relevant scientific information to decision makers and the public.

 

Develop and market strategic proposals for funding from individuals, private foundations, government agencies, and other sources to support collaborative work.

 

It is mutually agreed and understood by the partners that:

 

1.   This MOU is neither a fiscal nor a funding obligation document.

 

2.   It shall be the goal of both parties to ensure joint organizational recognition (e.g., logos, urls) on relevant public events/products produced as joint efforts under this MOU.

 

3.   Each signatory party shall obtain prior approval from the other for all joint press releases, advertisements, or other statements regarding projects or work products specified under this MOU and intended for the media, relevant decision makers, or the public.  Each party need not obtain such prior approval for any activity conducted solely and independently.

 

4.   The Partners shall consult regularly to discuss actions to implement the purpose of this MOU.

 

V.  Terms of Agreement

 

This agreement shall be reviewed by both partners annually to determine whether it should be  continued,  modified,  or  terminated.  This  agreement  shall  have  no  specified  term limitation, but may be terminated by either party upon 30 days written notice.

 

VI. Principal Contacts:

The principal contacts for this agreement are: Dr. David P. Philipp, Executive Director

Fisheries Conservation Foundation

1816 South Oak Street

Champaign, IL 61820

(301) 897-8616 (x208) Phone

(301) 897-8096 Fax

[correct email address]

 

 

Dr. Doug Austen, Executive Director

American Fisheries Society

5410 Grosvenor Lane, Ste. 110

Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 897-8616 Phone (301) 897-8096 Fax dausten@fisheries.org

 

ANNUAL MEETING GUIDELINES

 

 

2008 Edition (rev 4/08)

 

Foreword

 

The AFS Annual Meeting Guidelines Manual is intended as a briefing for a local chapter or agency that has decided to host a future annual meeting of the American Fisheries Society.

 

Wrap-up reports are available in the AFS office from previous annual meetings for hands-on information.  Past Program and General Meeting Chairs can be your best allies and sources of information, about handling the tasks at hand.  Please consult these reports and contact past organizers whenever you need additional advice.

 

Bidding for an Annual Meeting

 

The American Fisheries Society solicits bids from chapters and state agencies for its annual meetings more than four years prior to the actual event.  The bids are typically solicited on a rotating basis among AFS Divisions, but there is nothing to preclude solicitations “out-of- traditional-sequence,” especially when an insufficient number of bids are obtained from the targeted “geographic” Division.

 

A bidder’s package is normally requested by prospective hosts, from the AFS Office late winter or early spring.  The package provides guidelines and historical figures about attendance and numbers of hotel rooms used at past annual meetings.  The package requires prospective hosts to address items such as availability and price of air transportation, anticipated costs of hotel and meeting rooms, cost of services and amenities, entertainment options, expected climate and weather conditions, availability of AFS members to help plan and host the conference, and various other information. Per instructions from the AFS Office, the bid package is submitted during late spring or early summer by mail to the Chair of the AFS Time and Place Committee.

It is ultimately considered by the Time and Place Committee at the fall AFS Annual Meeting exactly four years prior to the event being proposedThe Time and Place Committee allows face-to-face presentations by the host Chapter and/or by city representatives, reaches consensus on a selection, and presents findings to the Incoming Governing Board later in the week.  The Governing Board decides whether to accept the Committee’s selection.

 

Tips for Successful Submissions

 

Successful bids usually have the strong support of a local AFS Chapter and/or a regionally based state or federal agency willing to help sponsor the event by providing volunteer employees and services to offset some of the costs associated with organizing such a large conference.  Bidders may wish to include representatives from the local Chapter and the local Convention and Visitor’s Bureau when they present their justifications to the Time and Place Committee.  These groups often prepare and show high-quality slide presentations or videos that depict the locale and its amenities.

 

In addition the most successful bids to host AFS annual meetings have been those demonstrating a wide variety of competitive airfares to the host city, reasonable hotel rates to accommodate a large block of rooms for attendees, centralized lodging and conference facilities, free use of convention facilities (often based on expected hotel occupancies), availability of discounted student room rates, and a host of social activities and attractions for members and family guests.

 

Past successful bids are also typically associated with a large number of AFS members in the host city or its surrounds – individuals who are willing to work on Local Arrangements-related activities.

 

Remuneration

 

1. The basic host unit for AFS Annual Meetings is an AFS chapter(s).  Host chapters will be offered a monetary return from the annual meeting they host, as a fixed percentage of that meeting’s net proceeds.  The host chapter may elect not to request such reimbursement. Alternatively, the host chapter may wish to designate all or a portion of their return to a specific AFS activity (such as the Skinner Student Travel Fund, Hutton Fund, and other specific Society needs).

 

2. The monetary return to the host chapter will be 10% of the net proceeds of the annual meeting. (Past net proceeds have ranged from $50,000 to over $100,000 from an AFS annual meeting, so host chapters can expect as much as 10K or more, for their efforts.)

 

3. The Society takes on all of the contractual risk in coordinating an annual meeting.  The Society also contributes staff hours and other labor costs, travel, and conference materials in helping to orchestrate an annual meeting.

 

4.  Divisions will receive 10% of the net proceeds if they forgo their regularly scheduled annual meeting and hold it in conjunction with the Society annual meeting.

Suggested Timeline Two Years Out August – September

 

Prepare to attend the Annual Meeting two years prior and the year prior to yours.  AFS will provide you with seed money if you are not able to have your travel funded by your office.

Make sure key people are planning to attend.  Often, the local convention and visitor bureau will

also attend to drum up interest in next year’s meeting.  Make use of this free service.

 

Conduct a preliminary meeting at the conference hotel with AFS staff, key members of the Arrangements Subcommittee, host hotel staff, and local convention and visitor’s bureau representatives to view facilities, establish relationships, define basic duties and schedules.

 

Begin fund raising.  It is never too early to start and it is important because contributors make budgets years in advance.

 

Year Before The Meeting

 

January-February

 

Hold a second meeting to ensure all contracts are adequate and in force, to initiate meeting budgeting process, to ensure subcommittees are fully staffed and charged with their duties, and to establish communication and coordination procedures among all meeting planners.

 

Begin search for speakers.  Program Committee with the AFS President has the lead, and must coordinate with the GMC.

 

If you have any need for catering an off-site event, start looking around. NegotiateA very valuable resource can be a local culinary association.

 

March-May

 

Establish the preliminary budget during a meeting of the Arrangements Committee.  Financial requests should be estimated for a rough draft budget.  Remember to include funds for promotion done by the AFS office.

 

Gather data on number of attendees by category (member, student, spouse, etc.), number attending social functions, quantities of food and beverage consumed, $$ spent on each function, etc.  This information is available in prior year’s wrap up reports that you can obtain through the AFS office.

 

Finalize the location of any off-site events.  Permits required for serving alcohol can sometimes be a hassle.  Use your imagination and see what your city has to offer.  People always enjoy the “fish fry”, but it is very common; variety is always welcomed.  Remember transportation.  Most buses carry 40 adults.  How many will you need?  Do you need fancy coaches or will school buses do?

 

People on the steering committee should have a good feel for their responsibilities by now.

You’ll still be recruiting to fill gaps but most tasks should be well covered.

 

If you plan on having entertainment at a banquet or any other function and have not yet made a

selection, you’d better do so soon.  Many entertainers book well in advance.

 

Get cost estimates from the hotel/caterer for coffee breaks, receptions, etc.  Play with menus and see where you can cut costs.  Menus submitted by the hotel can be changed.  They will customize something for you within your budget framework.  Negotiate to pay for coffee by the gallon and pastries and bagels by the dozen if the AFS office hasn’t done this earlier.  Our members are notorious for swarming to free food and drink and making a meal of it!  The menu

can be refined at a later date.  When budgeting leave room for an increase in prices if they cannot be set at this point in time. Beer is the hands-down favorite, but don’t forget wine and soft

drinks.  Get changes in writing.  Understand the caterer’s language (does per item mean per fish

or per serving?  What exactly does corkage mean?)

 

June

 

Work with the Fisheries staff and Abstract Coordinator to update the Call for Papers.  Decide topics for the short sidebar that changes each month in the Call for Papers.

 

Subcommittee reports and final budget requests due to the GMC.

 

Draft of budget due to the Executive Director and the Director of Administration and Finance.

 

July

 

A progress report should be in hand from all subcommittees.  Reconfirm assignments and deadline dates for individual subcommittee activities.

 

First call for papers is due in early July for publication in the September issue of Fisheries. Also include a brief write-up about the meeting site, dates, hotels, etc.  Though still a long way off, early exposure is important.

 

August

 

Begin developing the meeting web site, to be hosted on the AFS web site.

 

Governing Board Meeting at annual meeting – Report of GMC to the Governing Board on general program including budget and proposed registration fee for approval.

 

After Governing Board approval:  GMC shall authorize subcommittee budgets which constitute authority for each subcommittee chair to incur obligations to the total amount approved, only. Each subcommittee will keep a record of its expenditures and financial obligations.

 

Attend the annual meeting, observe, take notes, take photographs (they really help sub chairs who can’t attend), and talk to the local arrangements folks.  Take notes.  Pay attention to attendees also.  If you notice that someone looks lost, decide if a sign at that location would have been helpful.  If you hear someone complaining or sound frustrated, see how you would alleviate the particular problem next year.  Be “in touch” with what’s going on.  Learn from mistakes you observe.

 

At the Business Meeting the Program Chair and GMC will make a presentation highlighting next

year’s meeting and unveil the poster.  Lots of rah, rah!

 

Attend the wrap up session following the meeting for helpful hints from the planning committee, convention center / hotel staff, caterer, etc.  A great learning experience.  Second Call for Papers due for publication in October.

 

September

 

Third Call for Papers due for November issue. Begin making regular contact with hotel/convention center staff.  Good working relationships are important to the success of your meeting

 

Begin monthly committee meetings.  This is very important!  Recommended reading is “How to Make Meetings Work,” by Michael Doyle and Davis Straus.  Brainstorming and keeping up with each other’s’ progress is productive.  Publish minutes of each meeting for each member and copies to the AFS staff, President and President-elect, etc.

 

The Trade Show Chairman can begin drumming up local interest and working with the AFS Office Coordinator or contractor.  This person will handle all local trade show arrangements and be the contact between headquarters and the trade show decorator.  The mailings, exhibitor registrations, etc., are all handled through the AFS Office or contractor.

 

October

 

Fourth Call for Papers due for publication in the December issue.

 

AFS Office will prepare a registration form and do the first promotional mailing.

 

Open an interest-bearing bank account and order checks.  Apply for sales tax exempt status so

you won’t have to pay sales tax.

 

Meeting web site promoting the location, dates, speakers, theme, hotels, etc. should be ready and posted.  AFS will host the web site with access given to the local webmaster.

 

November

 

Prepare a write-up about the area and what there is to see and do, to submit for the January issue of Fisheries (due by November 15). Send the office a list of all chairs with phone, fax and e- mail addresses if not already done.

 

December

 

The steering committee meetings are critical for exchange of ideas.  No one realizes the amount of time that goes into seemingly minor decisions.

 

Nail down the general schedule for the week and any major items (event locations/themes) that are not yet finalized.  When will the business meeting, raffle, banquet, mixer, etc. take place? Contact your transportation company.

 

Provide the hotel/convention center with the master schedule of events from the previous year, as a starting point.  Most of the Governing Board meetings before the convention are the same, year after year, as are the luncheons throughout the week.  The hotel can enter these events in their computer and begin function sheets for each event.  All the details (such as seating arrangements, number of people, food to be served, equipment needed, etc.) will be fine-tuned as information comes in from AFS or the Program Chairman.  It’s helpful to keep the hotel up-to-date so that neither you nor they are overwhelmed the month before the meeting.  The AFS Office will

handle all the functions they are responsible for and have a separate account with the hotel. Make sure there is a clear understanding on the part of the hotel about what functions get billed to the AFS Office and what gets billed to the local host.

 

Letters should go out to all Section Presidents calling for meeting room needs (Section Business Meetings) and/or special tours.  You’ll want to know: estimated attendance, projection or other A/V needs, length of meeting, preferred seating style (conference, classroom, theater?), and preferred date/time (if they have a choice).  Try to schedule all of these before the technical sessions.  Letters should also mention the opportunity for the Section to organize and sponsor a symposium.  Ask the Continuing Education Committee Chair about Continuing Ed courses also. (Check with Manager of Unit Services in the AFS Office.)  The Program Chair and AFS President should be consulted about special scheduling needs.

 

Once all your time slots for events other than the technical program are set, let the Program Chair know the daily blocks of time he/she will have in which to schedule papers.

 

Suggestions for special sessions are due in December, so keep in close contact with the Program Chair.  The number of sessions will dictate much of the space needed and the scheduling of events.

 

Obtain a list of proposed special sessions and other program information the Program Chair may have.  Prospective delegates will be requesting such information for justifying attendance.  This will also come in handy when contacting possible sponsors/contributors.

 

The Public Relations person, working with AFS staff, should put together a general announcement including information about the program, trade show, Plenary, social events, etc. Mail out to media, commercial fishing groups, scientific organizations, consulting firms, politicians, and possible local exhibitors. (Postage adds up, so please budget accordingly.)

 

Find out if any of your facilities require that they be specifically named in AFS’s liability insurance.  The AFS Office will provide you with a general liability policy.

 

Assign someone the responsibility of taking meeting minutes.  These notes can be passed on to the AFS office and the next year’s Arrangement Committee, as well as your own.  It’s a good reminder of who’s responsible for what.

 

The February Fisheries article is due.

 

Have a relaxing holiday season!! The pace will pick up after the New Year!

 

Year Of The Meeting

 

January

 

Trade Show – continue contacting local groups to drum up business (local agencies, computer stores, fish/seafood processors, artisans, fishing guides/outfitters, etc.).

 

Put your feelers out for good slides depicting the meeting location.  Several committee members may want to submit slides; also check the photo bank at the local convention and visitor’s bureau. You’ll want photos for the April and June issue of Fisheries, including a vertical format photo for the supplement cover.

 

Will your hotel match up individuals requesting a roommate?  If not, decide how or if to handle this.  It’s not much work and is highly appreciated by students and others traveling alone.  This can be mentioned in the “hotel information” section of the March issue of Fisheries (due January

15). As individuals call, act as a referral service, passing on the name and number of possible roommates.  It is their responsibility to contact the person and make all arrangements. Ask them to call back so you know to cross them off the list or keep them in the pool.

 

Write an informative article for the March issue of Fisheries and send it in, with accompanying photos before January 15.

 

Familiarize yourselves with meeting room requests and the meeting rooms themselves so that you may begin scheduling.  Try to schedule technical sessions with similar themes in the same room throughout the meeting.  Section business meeting requests should be in by now. Everything will inevitably be shuffled around before it falls into place.  One person should be responsible for scheduling all non-technical meetings.

 

Abstracts are due this month.  Contact the Program Chair to determine the number of concurrent sessions.  Space will hopefully not be a limiting factor.

 

Make sure you date every item of correspondence, schedule, floor plan, etc. to alleviate confusion once revised plans start coming in.  A spreadsheet is imperative so you can keep track of all schedule changes.  There are several options available from previous meetings

 

In addition to the monthly Arrangements Committee meeting, begin holding subcommittee meetings.

 

Check into state requirements/legalities concerning the raffle.  Some states have become very

picky.  If a state is too picky sometimes playing “dumb” is the only answer.

 

Begin soliciting sponsors for the meeting bags if you haven’t already done so, or coordinate with your fundraising chair.  (Sponsor logos sometimes are printed on the back side of the bag.)

 

Choose a color scheme if desired. You can coordinate colors for bags, abstract covers, programs, signage, trade show decorating, meeting logo/letterhead, etc.

 

Continue soliciting donations/sponsorships.  Some commitments should start rolling in. Make final selection of commercial printer if not provided by host agency.

February

 

Confirm commitments with entertainers.

 

Get written contracts for all service agreements.

 

Abstracts are sent to Program Committee this month for review.  Should know exact number of accepted papers by mid-late month, then scheduling can begin.

 

Contact the Continuing Education Committee Chair and the Unit Services Coordinator about continuing education courses to be held during the convention.  Have them provide the necessary information to include in the registration form in the April Fisheries.

 

Start pulling information together for the April mini-supplement and June full supplement for Fisheries.  For April, you will need the pre-registration form and brief description about the hotels, transportation, program, plenary if possible, tours, socials, etc. The mini-supplement is due in mid-February. The June issue, due in early April is a biggie and needs to include everything. Don’t worry about listing rooms and exact times for talks at this point, as it is sure to change.  You will need: pre-registration form, airline, tour and car rental information, hotel costs and phone numbers,  map of the area, on-site registration schedule, trade show, special events (receptions, banquet, Spawning Run, etc.), advertisements, special luncheons with registration forms, program overview, program details, continuing education workshops with registration forms, etc. Much of the material can be assembled from the monthly articles already submitted and published.

 

Don’t handle tour tickets or related funds.  Work this out with your tour company in advance so they know what’s expected of them before the meeting as well as on-site.

 

Have copies of the meeting information on hand.  Extra meeting supplements are available from the AFS Office.  Many people who don’t receive Fisheries will request information and this could be very time consuming if you don’t make up several packets in advance.  Also, pass these packets on to your hotel, tour company, visitor’s bureau, convention center, etc., as it is helpful

to keep them informed.

 

Get AFS membership forms from the AFS Office to send out with the requested information. Let people know in advance that they can become a member and register for the meeting for the same cost as registering as a non-member.

 

Send requests for special invitation letters for foreign registrants to AFS Office.

 

The second mailing for the trade show goes out around the end of February (handled through

AFS office).

 

March

 

Work on continuing education information for May issue of Fisheries and submit by March 15.

 

Start working on conference t-shirts.  Find the best local silk screener, or check with the AFS office for a suggestion.  Come up with a t-shirt design.  Check with two previous meeting committees about how many were sold, so you don’t over-order.  Student groups usually are offered the opportunity to use this event as a fund raiser.

 

Meet with your tour company to make sure they’re on track with spouse tours and any other tours they’re handling.

 

Set a policy on discounts or waivers of registration fees for students willing to work as projectionists or providing other help during the meeting.  You may waive the registration fee if

 

they commit to a regular work schedule for the full week.  Indicate first, second, and third choices of sessions to work so they can participate while also being useful.  (Some local organizing committees simply pay students a fixed dollar amount, and let them use these proceeds for registering.)  Schedule a training time for student and other AV workers early in the meeting week.

 

Have you made arrangements for the Governing Board Retreat?  An informal atmosphere away from the meeting site is preferred.  Check with the AFS office to see if one should be scheduled

 

April

 

Put together a list of all technical session titles and their times, as these are also requested for justification to attend the meeting (if possible can be done in March).

Check with the AFS Trade Show Coordinator about discounted booths for local artisans. AFS Office sends letters out to all contributed paper authors informing them of the sessions

they’re in, as well as day and time of session (also posters and alternates).

 

The June full supplement for Fisheries is due. A proof will be sent for your approval in early May. Pay extra close attention to the published schedule and try to get AFS committees and sections to finalize their meeting times to avoid numerous “TBAs” in the June issue.

 

May

 

Check into renting radio-phones or cell phones.  These are invaluable for rapid communications among key Local Arrangements Committee staffers during the conference.  They are highly recommended or you’ll do a lot of unnecessary running around.  Test them ahead of time to

make sure they are powerful enough to use in the buildings.  Many times these can be donated by a phone or communications company.

 

Work on room scheduling (if possible can be done in April).

 

Send business meeting schedules to AFS Section Presidents and other meeting planners.  Times are more important than room assignments at this point.

 

Start thinking about A/V needs: slide projectors, carousels, LCD projectors, microphones, pointers, screens, podiums, etc. and arrange for spares of everything (especially projector bulbs).

 

Check on everything your facility can provide and assume nothing.

 

Make arrangements to secure AFS banner and podium cover from AFS office to be hung at the

Plenary Session.

 

Fill in program grid for the program book with abstract information that AFS will provide.  AFS

will provide local host with camera-ready text for printed abstract book.  Get bids from printers –

3 ring binders.

 

Make sure people involved with registration are familiar with the computer and the registration software.  Work out any bugs.  Plan for contingencies such as a PC hard drive locking up or a power outage.  AFS staff will handle on site registration.  They will need 2 PC’s and 2 HP desk jet printers.  Make sure to have extra ink cartridges.

 

Designate a secure space for storing the raffle prizes that are sure to begin rolling in. Get camera-ready logos from the organizations sponsoring the meeting bags.

Submit the July Fisheries article, which can wrap up loose ends or highlight the raffle.

 

June

 

Begin collecting items that will be included in the registration packets (a few “goodies” that have some lasting value, area brochures, coupons, local fishing information, special convention announcements, etc.).  However, don’t insert useless clutter.  Work with the AFS Office on final contents in package.

 

Firm up any service contracts that are not yet finalized (catering, equipment rentals, transportation, entertainment, etc.).  AFS Office signs and keeps a copy.

 

Emphasize the need for several food stations at all events.  Long lines continue to frustrate people, year after year.

 

Finalize artwork for t-shirts and decide on order.  All should be “preshrunk.” The size extra large will run out first and then large.  XX large and children’s shirts will also sell in smaller quantities.  Also order Spawning Run shirts.

 

Spawning Run (or other AFS sport events):  decide on course, purchase prizes (if not donated), arrange for stop-watches, megaphone, and all other equipment and assistance you’ll need to carry out this event

 

Order registration meeting bags.

 

Get updated list of trade show exhibitors from AFS office and prepare camera-ready copy for program.

 

Make a sign-up list for jobs that still need assistance.  Get commitments for all the “little details.”

 

Arrange for contacts for child care.  Be aware of local and legal implications of trying to handle it yourself.  Let attendees make their own arrangements with vendors.  You can provide a list of them in the daily bulletin.

 

Submit your final Fisheries article for August, and work on the schedule for the professional photographer with Fisheries staff.

 

July

 

Contact media with general announcement about the meeting.

 

Make up an on-site registration work schedule and begin getting firm (written) commitments from volunteers.  Also decide on a time for the registration training session.

 

Make up a camera-ready list of contributors/sponsors for inclusion in the program.  Have all program information camera-ready for the printer.

 

Make sure person in charge of student papers has necessary information for scheduling judges, and rating forms.

 

Confirm all commitments – call anyone and everyone with whom you have agreements for the week of the meeting.  If you are too busy to follow-up on a commitment, assign it to somebody that you are sure will take care of it.  Get commitments in writing.

 

Collect banners, signs, and logos from event sponsors to use during the meeting.

 

The local host will print the program as late as possible while still giving yourselves time for unforeseen circumstances (30 days).  Work with AFS Office on final format.  Make sure AFS office proofs final program book.  The more withdrawals and program changes you can catch before going to press, the less confusion there will be at the meeting. ORDER EXTRAS.

 

AFS office will make master CD of the program with local hosts input.  The manufacturing of the CD depends on wherever the price is the best.

 

Will parking be a problem?  Something to think about is that our members don’t like to pay

much.  If not negotiated beforehand, negotiate with hotel, convention center or parking vendor.

 

Plan on having an information-message center near, but separate from, the registration table.  If this is not provided in a convenient location, the registration crew will be bombarded with questions they do not have time to answer.  Also, arrange to have a phone at the registration table for work-related communication.  The information desk should have a phone as well.  This can double as the lost and found station.

Plan to have a bulletin board for posting of jobs and a separate one for posting of messages. Make sure you have checked with the registration subcommittee to see if anyone has special

needs.

 

AFS staff will begin sending name tags, receipts and envelope labels for pre-registered attendees.

 

August

 

Have a bag-stuffing party with lots of people.  Stuff generic bags then put personalized items (name badge, receipt, special events tickets, etc.) in manila envelopes. Put name in top corner of envelope and alphabetize.

 

Make up generic signs that can be customized and posted at a moment’s notice.  Use various sized sheets, some vertical, some horizontal, that have the AFS logo and enough space to print necessary information.  Also, make several signs with the logo and arrows pointing in different directions to post where you might find it helpful at the last minute.

 

Avoid hand-written (ad hoc) signs.  Use professional equipment or a fast vendor.

 

Confirm all commitments – again – the week before the meeting.  Make sure everyone knows when they’re supposed to be where, with how much of what.  Don’t let anything fall through the cracks.

 

Make sure there is an open line of communication with the hotel staff.  Provide a program and other pertinent information to the concierge.

 

Give caterer all updated numbers for the various functions.  Go through all details with hotel and convention center on set-up, props, food and beverage, entertainment, timing of their roles, etc.

 

Make sure everything is set for the Plenary Session.  Some speakers may need to be picked up at airport, etc.  Make a “dry run” if there is any audio/visual equipment involved.  Be sure pre- Plenary breakfast is set up for AFS Officers, Executive Director and speakers.

 

Set up the rooms in advance so you can make a sweep to check for details.  Every time a room is changed – seating or AV – check it well before its next use.

 

Let the caterer know you’ll want pitchers of water and glasses for the speakers in each meeting

room.  Replenish during the breaks.

 

Give the convention center/hotel a list of individuals with authority to make decisions, commit funds, etc.  You can identify these people with your group’s specific apparel, or with gold stars on their name badges.

 

Plan to have “gofers,” with vehicles, on-site.

 

Assign an informed individual to be stationed at the entrance to the opening “mixer.” People who have just rolled into town will be full of questions about when and where they can register, the schedule for the week, etc.

 

Have a “briefing” for the AFS staff as they are often approached for information that is as

foreign to them as the rest of the out-of-towners.

 

Have a pre-convention briefing with hotel staff, your committees, and AFS staff so everyone will know who the key players are.

 

Have programs at the headquarters hotel.  They receive many phone calls and requests for information and should be kept as informed as possible.

 

Label lights in the meeting rooms and if possible, set the dimmers to preselected levels..

 

A Daily Bulletin is a good idea especially for program changes, new items, etc.  Can be slipped under doors of hotel room or kept at the registration desk.

 

Have key people carry a list of important phone numbers and keep a list at the information booth as well.

 

Have back-up plans for all the worst-case scenarios.  Once the meeting starts you’ll be dealing with the many “challenges” that pop up.  Have your cell phones or radios (12-18 in the meeting office with necessary chargers).  This is where all the pre-planning and good working relations with convention center/hotel personnel pay off.  There’s still a lot of running around and the behind-the-scenes pace is hectic (if not frantic) so you’ll barely be aware of the fact that the meetings are taking place and all is running smoothly.  Remain calm, flexible and available. Many decisions will have to be made at a moment’s notice. You will find that a core group of 5-

6 Local Arrangements Committee members will be busy non-stop from Day 1 through Day 9 nearly 18 hours/day.  Again, the more committed individuals are, the better.  Don’t waste your time thinking about which technical sessions you’d like to sit in on, because it will never happen (unless of course you ask someone to “hold” your radio and disappear for a couple of hours).

 

Annual Meeting Structure And Organization

 

Organizers should strive to structure their meeting leadership according to this format: General Meeting Chair and Program Chair.  The General Meeting Chair is the person who “bridges the gap” between Program and Local Arrangements functions, and who plays a very significant role in fundraising for the Annual Meeting.

 

General Meeting Chair: The General Meeting Chair (GMC) should come from a leadership position within the host chapter, will usually live in close geographic proximity to the proposed site of the function, and normally will occupy a position of managerial leadership in the local aquatic resource community.  Usually recommended by the local organizing committee, this individual will eventually need to be appointed by a sitting AFS President.  Often, the GMC will have played some role in the bid presentation to the Time and Place Committee considering that year’s meeting, and will work with the eventual AFS President in coordinating interactions between Program and Local Arrangements functions, especially facility needs-related requirements and budgets.  Also, the GMC will help ensure good communications with that year’s AFS President, and between the Program and Local Arrangements committees.  The GMC will oversee all Local Arrangements functions and the budget for all elements of the proposed annual meeting.  The GMC will normally assist the organizing committee with local fundraising efforts for the intended meeting, through his or her extensive contacts in the regional aquatic resource community.  A GMC can serve as an effective point-of-contact for the AFS Office and the AFS Officers.  The future AFS President of the intended meeting will maintain direct communications and information exchange with both the Program Chair and GMC in collaboration with, and with significant input from the Society’s Executive Director.  AFS staff will provide guidance on annual meeting budgets and required oversight in approving annual meeting-related facility contracts.

 

Local Arrangements Chair: The GMC may serve in this capacity as well or appoint a Local

Arrangements Chair.

 

Program Chair (PC): This individual(s) coordinates all aspects of annual meeting program activities.  There may be different chairs for symposia, contributed papers and posters.  This person(s) has full autonomy to work directly with the future AFS President of the intended meeting and the Executive Director to achieve mutual program-related activities and goals.  He or she is also expected to work in close harmony with the GMC and local volunteers regarding room scheduling and facility needs.  The Program Committee will be responsible for coordinating the technical program with other meeting activities and with coordinating all program logistics with the GMC and the AFS Office.

 

The Program Chair(s) is selected by a newly installed Second Vice-President to oversee the Program-related functions of an annual meeting four years hence.  The Program Chair must be ultimately and officially appointed to this position by the sitting AFS President in the year

they become Program Chair.  In the interim years, the Program Chair-designate will be appointed by various sitting Presidents to serve as a member of each AFS Program Committee beginning three years in advance of chairing their specific Program Committee.  This ensures continuity of Program-related operations within the Society, and it promotes appropriate training for undertaking one of the most important and highly visible positions within AFS: that of Program Chair.  The Program Chair is also expected to serve as a highly informed member of the Program Committee during the year following their Chairperson role, to pass on his or her substantial knowledge to new leaders.

 

The Program Chair helps the future AFS President and the Executive Director achieve Program- related objectives for the planned conference.  Usually, the future AFS President will oversee Plenary Session activities for the Annual Meeting, at which they preside, including invitations to appropriate Plenary speakers.  The future AFS President will coordinate the selection of Plenary speakers with the Program Chair.  AFS may provide transportation, complimentary registrations, and up to two nights lodging for each Plenary speaker.  (The AFS staff normally coordinates the logistics of travel and all other associated arrangements for each Plenary speaker.)  The future AFS President will also provide guidance about desired sessions that highlight his or her

Program of Work for the year.  However, the Program Chair has wide latitude in recommending specific sessions and other Program Committee helpers, and in soliciting sessions and reviewing abstracts submitted to his or her Committee.  The Program Chair must organize the First Call for Sessions (published in Fisheries) during September of the year preceding the target Annual Meeting.  The First Call for Papers is usually announced by November of the preceding year.

 

Program Chairs may wish to solicit help in the form of a local Co-Chair(s).  Because AFS Program Chairs rarely live in the city of the planned meeting, it can be extremely helpful to solicit Co-Chair assistance from one who does.  This Co-Chair can perform meeting room site visits – an exceedingly valuable function in coordinating room assignments for specific sessions, based on first-hand knowledge about the peculiarities and room sizes of the meeting facilities. For example, some sessions (expected to be popular) must have large rooms set aside for anticipated increased attendance.  A Program Co-Chair can also assist with scheduling, organizing sessions that highlight local or regional issues, and in coordinating the review of

submitted abstracts, particularly those intended for the Poster Session. It is important to avoid the scheduling of a popular session in a room too small for comfortable seating by all attendees.  A local Program Co-Chair provides Program Committee representation during the periodic

 

pre-conference meetings held by the Arrangements Committee.  They may also be logical choices to oversee the Contributed Paper sessions and/or Poster Sessions.

 

The Program Chair must give careful thought to selecting session chairs and a poster session chair that has a proven track record in assembling high-quality speakers.  The Program Chair must closely coordinate all activities (especially budget needs and projections) with the GMC.

 

The following policy should be made known to all attendees:

 

  • Videotaping, audio taping, or photographing the presentations is strictly prohibited.

 

  • Mobile phones and pagers and other devices generating sound must be turned off in the session room.

 

  • Attendees using laptop computers, personal digital assistants, or other electronic devices generating light must sit in the back half of the room to avoid disturbing fellow attendees.

 

Local Arrangements

 

The Local Arrangements Committee (comprised of subcommittee chairs) will be headed by the GMC who must delegate responsibilities early in the game. It is desirable that the GMC be headquartered in close enough proximity to the meeting site to permit easy personal contact with hotel and convention facility staff at all times.  The subcommittees of the Local Arrangements Committee are recommended as follows:

 

Suggested Subcommittees: Accommodations Audio Visual Aids

Banquet, Social Activities, and Entertainment

 

Budget and Finance Child Care Communications Fundraising

Hospitality (companion program) Photography

Printing (oversight, most functions performed by AFS staff) Program Committee Rep (Co-Chairs)

 

Publicity and Media Relations

 

Raffle (may be chaired by a chapter outside the meeting area) Registration (oversight, most functions performed by AFS staff) Signs

Spawning Run

 

Students

 

Tours, Transportation, and Information

 

Trade Show

 

Welcoming and Protocol

 

Expected Communication:

 

Begin a list of key elements and add-on as the need arises.  The more people you involve throughout the planning stages, the smoother things will run during the meeting.  Each person in charge of each area is responsible for recruiting the help he/she will need to get the job done.  By the end, you will need to assign someone to every detail to alleviate last minute confusion and problems.  Develop a time line, a check list, and use them (see past annual meeting documents that summarize this chronology, available from AFS Office.)

 

The GMC will be in complete charge of all social activities, facility functions, and the budget of the meeting, but all budget expenditures above $10,000 must be cleared with the AFS Executive Director first.  The GMC will have authority over all matters pertaining to arrangements for the meeting, will authorize changes, monitor progress of subcommittees to handle the various divisions of responsibilities, and will coordinate relative responsibilities with AFS staff and hotel and meeting center representatives.  AFS staff will meet with the GMC and the Local Arrangements Committee as needed for site inspections, negotiating with hotels, etc. and will review and assist in formation and refinement of the meeting budget.  The AFS Executive Director will approve proposed budget and sign all contracts with hotels and other facilities.

 

1.  The GMC will submit monthly reports during June, July, and August preceding the meeting, to the AFS President and Executive Director on activities concerning the planning of the meeting.  A detailed report and a meeting budget will be presented to the AFS Governing

Board for approval at its August/September meeting preceding the Annual Meeting.  This budget must be adhered to.  Any substantial changes must be cleared by the Executive Director before implementation.

 

2.  The GMC will meet with the subcommittees, as necessary, to outline their functions and orient the members as to what is expected before, during, and after the meeting.  The GMC will serve as an ex-officio member of all subcommittees.

 

3.   The GMC will have the authority to accept contributions or sponsorship of any portion of the meeting activities, supplies, in-kind services, etc.  This Chair must approve any and all contributions tendered, before any can be confirmed by any subcommittee personnel.  All offers should be made in writing and all confirmations will be made in writing by the GMC.  Should there be a perception of a potential conflict of interest in any sponsorship, the GMC may discuss this with the AFS Executive Director.

 

4.   The GMC or  the delegated committee will list all monetary and material contributions in the official meeting program and will see that sponsor participation is properly recognized at appropriate events, by letter.

 

5.  The GMC will coordinate the preparation of the meeting budget with the AFS Executive Director. AFS establishes reasonable registration fees.  The Local Arrangements Committee prepares an analysis of meeting costs and a budget.  Be sure to include a contingency for the unforeseen expenses that inevitably come up, 10-15% of all other fixed costs.  The total meeting cost can then be divided by the anticipated number or registrants and the resulting figure added to the basic registration fee structure to arrive at a final registration fee structure that will be discussed with AFS President and Executive Director and approved by the Governing Board. Ultimately, however, meeting budget decisions are the responsibility of the AFS office.  It is critical that local costs be used to estimate major expenditure items.

 

6.   Upon being selected, it is critical to reserve immediately all meeting and lodging facilities that will be required before and during the meeting.  AFS staff will negotiate contracts with the hotel and/or convention center and make a copy available to the GMC.

 

7.   Begin thinking about off-site functions such as a fish fry, picnic, and “Spawning Run” well in advance of your meeting. Try to add some local flair. Visualize a good time and make sure everyone has fun.

 

8.   Remember that the key to a successful meeting is early planning and having contingency plans for everything.  The GMC needs to have an interest in every detail.  Be sure to be involved.

 

9.   If possible, reserve meeting space so that all technical sessions are on the same level of the hotel/convention center.  Rooms need to be large enough to hold people comfortably.  Make sure there is enough flexibility to switch rooms at the last minute if a session looks too full.  Make certain that American Disability Act requirements can be met and that “green” meeting requirements are met.

 

10.   Make use of large, open spaces.  House the trade show (approximately 60 exhibitors), poster session (100 boards), AFS publication sales, raffle display, and all coffee breaks in one “grand hall”, which works very well for drawing traffic for both Poster Session participants and Trade Show exhibitors.

 

11.  In addition to the space needed for the technical sessions, several rooms will be needed for various meetings (Governing Board and Section Business Meetings) as well as a handful of rooms at the headquarters hotel.  Don’t forget to book two additional ad hoc rooms for the week as well as audio/visual preview rooms.  It’s helpful to have an A/V office to which all A/V questions can be directed (next to the preview rooms).  Have back-up equipment.   It is not safe

 

to assume that each speaker will bring his/her own carousel.  An extra LCD projector is a good idea. Also, reserve a meeting room for the AFS/Local Arrangements Office.

 

12.   Coordinate the final wrap-up reports from all subcommittee chairs.  Reports on attendance, meeting and guest rooms used, counts on special meal functions, final budget, and report of income and expenses are all very helpful in planning future meetings.  Each subcommittee

should submit a final report.  These reports are kept on file in the AFS Office and are available to all future subcommittee chairs as guides.   Make the wrap-up session as brief as possible, highlighting the main points only.

 

Accommodations Subcommittee

 

The Accommodations Subcommittee will work directly with hotel management personnel and AFS staff and will be responsible for providing all guests and dignitaries with appropriate conveniences.

 

1.  The Accommodations Subcommittee will make the necessary general arrangements for all meeting rooms including the meeting office. The meeting office should be ready on the Thursday morning before the meeting and equipped with a minimum of four computers with capability of sending and receiving e-mail and word processing and spread sheet software, one laser printer, good quality copier with extra toner and paper supply, phones, and the usual office furnishings and supplies.  AFS staff and the local hosts should share the same office.

 

2.  The Accommodations Subcommittee Chair will keep a schedule of all meetings (technical, business, etc.) and all activities, room arrangements, and AV requirements.  This master schedule should be kept on a spreadsheet.  Prior year formats are available.  This information is subsequently provided to the hotel and or conference center so it is very important that all activities be recorded accurately and all changes are kept up to the minute, as well.  If possible obtain the conference center or hotel’s master room schedule to verify your information and coordinate adjustments.

 

3.   One member of this Subcommittee shall be on duty at all times from 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and shall be headquartered in the meeting office.

 

4.   The Subcommittee Chair will oversee all arrangements needed for AFS business meetings and technical sessions, seeing that an ample number of chairs, rostrums, podiums, etc. are available and convenient.

 

The following chart gives examples of events that are arranged by the AFS office and coordinated with the local committee for room space.  All food and beverage, AV needs etc. will be the responsibility of the AFS office and they will deal with the hotel directly.  All charges for these events will appear on a separate bill and are not considered part of the meeting budget.  The President’s Suite will be stocked with food (snacks) and beverage paid for by the AFS office.  It is extremely helpful if a local person is

assigned the responsibility of buying these groceries using a list that the AFS office will provide and have it ready by Wednesday evening.

 

 

 

Day Event No. Attending
Thursday 8-5 Management Committee 18
Friday 8-5 Governing Board Retreat – off site 45
Saturday 8-5 Governing Board Meeting Hollow rectangle for 45 and peripheral seating for 50 100
Saturday 5-8 Governing Board Social – work with local host to find suitable site with unique venue 60
Sunday 9-noon Time & Place Comm. 10
Sunday Noon Journal Editors lunch 12
Monday 7-8 AM Plenary Speakers Breakfast 10
Monday Noon – 1 PM Awards & Plenary SpeakersLunch – in President’s Suite 20
Monday 3-5PM Journal Editorial BoardsMeeting 45 people
Tuesday 7 -9 AM Fisheries breakfast 7 people
Tuesday Noon-1:30 Awards Luncheon 30 people
Wednesday Noon-2 PM Past Presidents Lunch 17 people
Thursday 7 -8:30 AM Incoming Governing BoardBreakfast 40 people

 

 

 

Audio Visual Aids Subcommittee

 

1.   This Subcommittee will supervise all arrangements needed for microphones, pointers, screens, projectors, and other types of visual aids such as bulletin boards, chalk boards, etc. Trained operators of projection equipment shall be provided and instructed to arrange a review of material to be projected with each speaker prior to the opening of the session.  An A/V room for participants to review slides, tapes, etc. is to be provided.  Loud speaker systems shall be

checked and adjusted for each speaker.  (Note: The Program Chair shall require all moderators,

 

conveners, and session chairs to submit written requests regarding meeting room set-ups and equipment to the GMC.) Buying some AV equipment is sometimes more economical than renting.  Flip chart pads, electronic timers, portable microphones, and laser pointers are good examples.  See what the previous year’s committee is willing to pass on.

 

2.   Students can be used to assist with AV equipment operation in return for complimentary or reduced registration.  If this is done, it is important to control the number of hours each student must work in return for the registration fee and to monitor their attendance in the sessions.  Time cards can be used.  It is a good idea to have backup students.  A training session must be scheduled early in the meeting week for all student volunteers and others who will be handling AV.  A separate Subcommittee Chair could be in charge of all student volunteers.

 

Registration Subcommittee

 

The Registration Subcommittee and the AFS office will be in charge of registration for all functions during the convention. Computer expertise on this committee is strongly advised.

 

1.   The AFS office will design the registration form in consultation with the Registration

Subcommittee.  AFS will also design the online form.

 

2.   Registration processing will be done by the AFS Office.  Money will be wired to the local

host’s bank account on a periodic basis established by host and AFS Office.

 

Onsite Registration

 

3.   It will be necessary to open the registration area on Saturday so that pre-meeting subcommittees and dignitaries will be able to register.  Saturday is a good time to pre-test procedures with early-registering members of the Governing Board.  It is desirable that the registration desk be staffed on the following schedule:

 

Pre-Meeting Day (Saturday)                                                           12:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Day I (Sunday)                                                                                10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Day II (Monday)                                                                               7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Day III (Tuesday)                                                                              7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Day IV (Wednesday)                                                                        7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Day V (Thursday)                                                                                    7:00 a.m. to noon

4.   The AFS Office is responsible for printing badges, envelope labels, and receipts.  Names must be large enough to read easily. Badge format will be reviewed by local host before being printed.

 

5.   It is important that all registration personnel be familiar with events, locations, etc.  A training session beforehand is strongly advised.  AFS staff will process all onsite registration. Local host will handle preregistered attendees.

 

6.   Stickers or letters on badges work well for social events, but you must monitor entrance to events carefully which requires additional staffing.

 

7.   Beginning about 2 months before the meeting, weekly preregistration totals should be sent to the local host registration chair.

 

8.   Exhibiting companies receive two complimentary registrations with each booth reserved and must be figured in the budget.

 

9.  Ribbons for exhibitors, staff, hosts, officers, Pro Club, etc. will be ordered by the AFS Office and sent to the subcommittee chair.  They will be put into the registration packets which the local host prepares.  AFS Office will provide the labels to put on the registration envelopes.  Many times there are leftover ribbons from the previous year and they are passed directly from old

chair to new chair. The local host is responsible for ordering meeting bags and stuffing them prior to the meeting.  A large stuffing party is a good way to accomplish this task.

 

10.  AFS Office will begin sending registration data for the printed badges, receipts and envelope labels to registration subcommittee in July.

 

11.  Local registration committee will deliver registration bags to the Governing Board members on Saturday.

 

Budget and Finance Subcommittee

 

1.   The Budget and Finance Subcommittee will be responsible for all funds received and expended before, during, and after the convention and will work closely with the GMC and subcommittee chairs.  Setting the budget is an important task of the meeting.  Accurate figures for expenses are necessary; allowing room for slight changes after the budget is set.  Have subcommittees meet with appropriate local vendors to secure quotes.  Read all the wrap-up reports from previous annual meeting chairs.  Since AFS assumes all the financial obligations of the meeting and there is no financial liability to the host organization AFS is ultimately responsible for the meeting budget.  A draft budget should be prepared by the local host and submitted to the AFS Executive Director by June of the year before the meeting.  It is important that the Executive Director has adequate time to go over the host’s recommended figures.  The AFS Office will take into consideration all the concerns of the local host and the AFS Executive

Director will retain final approval.  The GMC will present the budget to the Governing Board for approval at the Annual Meeting prior to theirs.

 

2.   It shall be the responsibility of this subcommittee to collect local donations and contributions, issue proper receipts, pay bills, and when all bills are paid, transfer excess revenue to the AFS Executive Director, along with a financial statement accounting for receipts and disbursements

of all funds.  If all bills are not paid by the end of the year, transfer excess revenue to the AFS Office at that time and refer all remaining bills to the same.  The meeting facility representative

 

should understand the difference between the Society and the local host. Two master accounts will be established at the headquarters hotel, one by the host and one by AFS.

 

3.   The Budget and Finance Chair will secure “sales-tax-exempt status” from the state or use the local Chapter’s or Agency’s sales tax exempt certificate if possible.  This is not the same as an EIN number.  It may take almost a year to accomplish this.

 

4.   The Budget and Finance Subcommittee Chair will open an account in one of the local banks under the name of “American Fisheries Society Meeting” and all meeting income shall be deposited to this account.   These accounts should be established at least 12 months prior to the meeting.  One or two people should be authorized to sign checks, usually the chair of this subcommittee and the General Meeting Chair.  The AFS Office will provide any paperwork necessary to open the account.  Any expenditures and disbursements made from the “American Fisheries Society Meeting” account must be approved by the GMC.

 

5.   AFS staff and The Budget and Finance Chair will be responsible for providing the necessary cash drawers and the change needed at the opening of each session.

 

6.   The Budget and Finance Chair will present a financial statement to the General Meeting

Chair upon completion of all transactions within 30 days after the close of the meeting.

 

7.   Review (daily) all bills and banquet orders with the Manager of Convention Services at the hotel in order to check for errors.  It is easier when activities are fresh in your mind.

 

8.   Arrange for a safety deposit box at the meeting hotel.

 

Fundraising Subcommittee

 

The Fundraising Subcommittee shall be responsible for soliciting local contributions and sponsorship of events/activities at the meeting to reduce registration costs for participants.  It is critically important that this function be started more than a year in advance of the meeting, planned well, and fully carried out.  Subcommittee staffing is critical.  Extroverts are needed who are well-connected and who believe completely in the AFS mission who can convincingly argue for the level of support needed.  The Chair of this subcommittee should work with the AFS Executive Director and the AFS President in order not to duplicate solicitations. (Contributions from national and international sources are the responsibility of the AFS Office).

 

1.   The Fundraising Chair will be responsible for setting preliminary and final fundraising goals in concert with the GMC and Budget and Finance Subcommittee.

 

2.   The Subcommittee will define opportunities for event sponsorship in conjunction with the annual meeting.

 

3.   The Fundraising Chair will coordinate strategy with the AFS Executive Director to ensure that annual meeting fundraising efforts complement general Society fund raising.

 

4.   Strategies should be developed for individual, corporate, and agency contributions.  In each case, target lists should be compiled, AFS members designated to make the needed contacts, schedules defined and appropriate recognition given.

 

5.   The subcommittee’s goal, in addition to developing needed support, should be to make every donor/sponsor feel adequately recognized and that they are getting good value for their contribution.

 

6.   Make a list of events, with tentative costs, that can be passed on to prospective sponsors. Be cautious of offers that include conditions or have strings attached.

 

7.   It takes a while to get the word out and drum up interest in the meeting, so begin early.  It is much easier to get sponsorship for a specific event or specific product than to solicit general financial contributions.  Remember, all events may be sponsored.  Your list should cover a wide financial range to meet various budgets. Coffee breaks, meeting bags, banquet, receptions for past presidents, entertainment, printing of program and abstracts, signs, transportation, audio visual aids, etc. are excellent sponsorship opportunities. Make sure you let the prospective sponsor know how he/she will benefit.  If they provide a banner, it can be displayed during the event they sponsor, or a poster can be made.  A verbal announcement may also be made, and they will be recognized in the November issue of Fisheries following the meeting.  Play up their exposure!

 

8.   Donations-in-kind may also be solicited.  Try for donations of seafood, soft drinks, beer, wine, printing, etc. Even a small donation of snacks is welcome for the hospitality suite.  If the host facility will not allow you to bring in donated beverages or if the corkage fee is extremely high see if you can negotiate a cash donation from the vendor and in return let them know you will feature their products at the social (if possible).  This may be an alternative arrangement if the facility fees are cost prohibitive.

 

9.   Again, begin early in order to get into the budget cycle and think of ways to make donations feasible from contributors.

 

Social Activities, & Entertainment Subcommittee

 

1.   The Social Activities, and Entertainment Subcommittee will plan, organize, and oversee all general meeting social functions including coffee breaks.  Governing Board activities will be the responsibility of the AFS Office unless the Subcommittee wishes to plan an evening social for

the Governing Board on the Saturday night prior to the start of the meeting.  Check with the AFS Office Manager about this event.

 

2.   Preparation of a closing social and other entertainment must be started well in advance of the meeting in order to economically contract for high quality, appropriate entertainment.  Be sure to actually see any entertainment to be sure they do not contain potentially offensive material (especially to minorities, women, and political parties).

 

3.   Social events may include a banquet, a social in the trade show hall, and an informal picnic

or barbecue that reflects the flavor of the local area.  A welcome mixer is usually held on Sunday night, but this night could just as well be left open for attendees to network and explore the local

 

area on their own.  People remember these activities and it is an important part of the meeting. Donated beverages are encouraged at these events in order to reduce costs.  Order more food and beverage than the facility caterers recommend.  You’ll need it!

 

Program Committee

 

1.   The Program Committee will be responsible for coordinating the technical program with other meeting activities and coordinating all program logistics with the GMC.  A Co-Chair can be particularly helpful, especially if they live in the host city.  The Program Chair coordinates all technical content directly with the AFS President.

 

2.   The AFS President will coordinate the selection of Plenary speakers with the Program Chair. AFS will provide transportation, complimentary registration and up to two nights lodging for each speaker. If possible and to control costs, the AFS office will coordinate the logistics of travel and all other associated arrangements for each speaker.

 

3.    The Program Chair should designate an individual to serve as his or her representative to the

Local Arrangements Committee.

 

4.  AFS Staff will coordinate the abstract submission process with the Program Chair and committee and will be responsible for producing a searchable database of the abstracts.  The Committee Chair and Committee are responsible for assigning room, time and numbers to the individual presentations.

 

5.  A Poster Chair is usually appointed as a sub chair since the number of posters has increased in recent years. Prominence should be given to displaying this form of presentation preferably in

the Trade Show Hall. A special viewing time featuring the posters with no competing oral sessions is recommended.

 

PROGRAM COMMITTEE INSTRUCTIONS

 

More than one year before the meeting

 

In late spring or early summer, the Program Chair should work on encouraging symposia on timely subjects at the future meeting, and should take careful note of the balance of marine and freshwater subjects, as the meeting location can sometimes tip the balance in one direction or another. The Program Chair should try to balance marine and freshwater subjects as much as possible.

 

In June, the Program Chair should be involved in the First Call for Papers, which goes in the September issue of Fisheries but is due in early July. The Program Chair should work with the General Chair and the Publicity Chair on this and future Calls for Papers. The Program Chair should correspond with the current Program Chair or the Abstracts Coordinator about soliciting symposium proposals that are in a useful and effective format and pin down all the actual dates for symposium proposals, contributed abstracts, and symposium abstracts, which are all submitted electronically.

 

A year before the meeting

 

At the Annual Meeting, the Program Chairs should try to attend a meeting with the current Program Committee or Meetings Committee, or try to speak with the current Program Chair about what unexpected issues came up in planning or at the meeting.

 

At some point after the meeting with the current Program Chairs, the Program Chair should arrange to meet with other members of his or her Committee (i.e., the Symposia Chair, the Contributed Papers Chair, and the Posters Chair, if all of those are separate people, and the Abstracts Coordinator to meet and discuss the plan in the upcoming months. They should discuss the space of the next meeting center, and specifically what implication that has for the number of oral presentations that can be accommodated. If the space is somewhat limited, the Program Committee may decide to only allow attendees to submit one oral presentation at the meeting (or, one each to contributed and symposia, maximum), or give symposium organizers an upward

limit to how many oral presentations can be included in their symposium (such as 30). Make a general equation, based on the number of rooms available, the number of days of the meeting, and the number of presentations a day (20), minus the time slots that are already taken up (i.e., for Plenary, Business meeting, Poster Session). The number provided will be a guideline for whether the meeting will be a “big” meeting (oral-presentation-wise), or not.

 

The Abstracts Coordinator will brief the Program Committee on the standards for Abstracts, the Program Book, the Abstracts Book, and the CD. As stated on the abstract submission form, abstract text must not be more than 250 words, and titles cannot contain acronyms. Common names should be used in place of scientific names in titles (unless the common name is not widely known, and titles may only have proper nouns and the first letter of the first word

capitalized. The Program Book will contain a grid of presentations, which will display date, time, room, title and the first five authors, as well as an index of authors. The CD will be made up of the Program Book contents, information on awards, supporters, exhibitors, and the raffle, in addition to an abstract search engine and information about AFS. The Abstract Book will contain titles, authors, and full abstract texts for all presentations and is ordered by symposium and contributed session.

 

During the Fall and into December, the Program Committee should continue to encourage colleagues and potential symposium organizers to get a symposium together, and submit a proposal. Once the deadline for symposium proposals occurs, the Program Chair can either review the proposals him or herself, or pass them along to a small proposal-reading committee, if he or she has organized that. In either case, symposium organizers should be informed of their acceptance as soon as possible, and certainly before the mid-January deadline for contributed abstracts. Symposium abstracts can be submitted after the contributed abstract deadline passes, and the symposium organizer should be aware that the actual presenter (and not the symposium organizer) should be submitting the abstract.

 

Once contributed abstracts are all in, the Program Chair or the Program Committee can decide to review them for quality. In doing so, the Program Committee may wish to advise contributed submitters to revise their abstracts for whatever reason. Keep in mind that the Abstracts Coordinator will take care of all corrections to abstracts, but that these should be done before the scheduling meeting. The Contributed Chair should also arrange all presentations into sessions,

 

and should order those within the sessions. The Contributed Chair should feel free, with the approval of the rest of the Program Committee, to design different sessions than the ones that submitters chose from the abstract submission form based on the subjects of the abstracts.

 

Once all the symposium abstracts are in (about a month after the Contributed abstracts) the Program Committee should hold a scheduling meeting as soon as possible. The meeting should take place before April, if possible. The Abstracts Coordinator, the Program Chair, and the Contributed Chair must attend this meeting. The Local Arrangements Chair, who has information on the size and layout of the convention rooms, should also participate, if possible. During this meeting, the Program Committee should have a visual layout of the convention and its rooms, and should know the amount of people that can fit into every room that will be used.

The Program Committee should schedule each individual presentation, giving it a Date, a Room, a Start and End Time. New Abstract Numbers should also be used to number symposium presentations consecutively. Symposia will also be numbered in the order of their appearance in the schedule.

 

Once the schedule is made, the Abstracts Coordinator and the Technical Coordinator will develop the searchable database, which will be posted on the web. Meanwhile, the Program Committee should draw up general guidelines for presenters, including oral and poster presenters. This information should include information about the technical requirements, and whatever other information (i.e., how to make a good presentation) the Program Committee is interested in detailing.

 

Once those materials are ready to be disseminated, the Program Committee and the Abstracts Coordinator will share those materials with the GMC, and then will send an email to all presenters, informing them of the newly-available schedule and the meeting website, which contains general information about their presentations and the meeting. The email should also point out the necessity of meeting registration (and paying for that registration).

 

Once those emails are sent out (early April), the Program Committee and the Abstracts Coordinator should be in contact to convey any cancellations that they become aware of. The Abstracts Coordinator will change the schedule to fill gaps left by cancelled presentations up until the printed-materials deadline. The Abstracts Coordinator will also begin working on the Program Book and Abstracts Book. The Abstracts Coordinator will send drafts to the Program Committee for their review and will consult with them on any questions. The Program Book and Abstracts Book should be sent to the printer as late as possible, so that it can be as updated as possible (since cancellations come in often).

 

Once the materials are being printed, the only thing left for the Program Committee to do is to make sure all cancelled presentations are referred to the Abstracts Coordinator, who keeps a running list of post-print cancellations, and will make an Addendum to the Program, which will be handed out at Registration when the Meeting begins.

 

Printing Subcommittee

 

1.   This subcommittee is in charge of all proof reading and printing necessary for the meeting.

 

2.   The subcommittee will arrange for artwork for the meeting logo.  AFS staff will design, format and print the meeting program and the abstracts.  The Program Committee and the GMC will have input into the format

 

3.   The AFS staff will be responsible for formatting and burning the master CD of the abstracts database.  They will work with the local host to arrive at a suitable design.

 

4.   The local host is responsible for selecting the art work for the meeting poster and soliciting the artist.  The AFS Office must approve the artwork and be the signer on any contracts with the artist.  AFS will print the poster and mail copies to members of the Fisheries Administrators and Education Section.  The local host may provide labels for additional mailings.

 

Publicity Subcommittee

 

The Publicity Subcommittee will be responsible for soliciting, organizing, and disseminating all news releases to appropriate media before, during, and after the meeting.  In addition, they will invite news media to selected sessions and will arrange interviews between meeting participants and media contacts.

 

Publicizing the annual meeting before, during, and after the event is an important responsibility of meeting organizers.  Publicity can boost meeting attendance, attract coverage for Plenary speakers and symposia, increase AFS visibility, encourage the use of AFS as a source of fisheries news and stories, and prompt articles about fishery science and issues.

 

Development of the AFS Annual Meeting web site is an important form of publicity.

 

Before the Meeting

 

The AFS Office will organize all promotions before the meeting to the AFS membership and related professionals. Promotions in Fisheries are as follows:

 

September – December: two-page spread with Call for Papers January-August: one-page articles of 600 words, photos optional April: “mini-supplement” of four pages plus registration form June: full supplement of 24 pages

All material is due six weeks before the month of publication, except for the First Call for Papers and the June supplement, which should be in eight weeks before. All material must come from a single point of contact (the Publicity Chair or the General Chair). Please provide text and photos and let the headquarters staff create the layout. See previous issues for typical topics, style, and length.

 

Other internal publicity (within AFS) efforts can be to send announcements about the meeting to

AFS unit newsletter editors several months ahead of time. The AFS units coordinator can help

 

arrange this. Also, announcements can be sent to the AFS listserv warning of the expiration of

the room block and/or expiration of the “early bird” registration rate.

 

For external publicity, read the AFS “Working with the Media” brochure.  This outlines information such as how to create a media strategy, how to write a press release, and how to do well in media interviews.

 

Assign one person to be the media liaison.  This person is responsible for promoting the meeting to the media, handling interviews and press inquiries, organizing press facilities at the conference, and working with AFS Fisheries staff on related media efforts.  This person must be knowledgeable about the meeting schedule and highlights, well-spoken, available, and easily accessible.  The person also must be willing to help the AFS Fisheries staff locate lists of local and regional media, review conference press releases, and help promote the meeting in monthly conference promotion articles in Fisheries.

 

Find out from the Program Chair who the plenary speakers are as early as possible.  Major speakers are a huge media draw.  Knowing if they are attending well in advance means additional media work, and promotion can be planned and executed

 

Two to three press releases are distributed prior to the annual meeting.  One is a simple announcement of the conference that is sent to calendar editors at local, regional, national, and international natural resource newsletters, outdoor media, magazines and others.  This often is sent in January of the year of the conference to allow for long magazine lead times (three months average) and to ensure the meeting is listed repeatedly in monthly calendars.  This also allows time for reporters to generate travel funds if they want to cover the meeting.

 

A second press release announcing the plenary speakers and highlighting some of the symposia is sent in July (for a late August meeting) to local newspapers, outdoor writers, and local and regional magazines.  The press release should note whether plenary speakers are available for interviews before or after his or her presentation.  It could also include a list of some or all of the symposia leaders in case media want to pursue a certain fisheries subject.  An annual meeting supplement (bound into the June Fisheries each year) may be included in mailings to top reporters. Contact the Fisheries editor for extra supplement copies.

 

A third release can also be distributed in media kits to local media who live near the meeting (within two weeks of conference). The release could include updates on speakers and symposia, media contacts, and general media information such as location of phones, registration costs if any, availability of interview rooms, permission to photograph speakers, etc.  Press releases should be sent to the WWW page coordinator.

 

Help the AFS Office create media kits.  Media kits might include a copy of the second and third press releases, a program, a meeting supplement, biographies of the plenary speakers, a map of key conference locations, phone numbers of key contracts, information on whether media can attend meals, etc.  Such kits are sent to local media who are likely to attend, and distributed in the press room.

 

The week before the conference, the media liaison and any volunteers should call all local media

(newspapers, magazines, radio stations, TV stations) to personally invite them and answer

 

questions.  Ask for the outdoor writers and environment reporter. You might also pitch the business reporter on the economic importance of recreational and commercial fisheries and the features editor on the human dimensions aspect of fisheries.  A list of media who say they are coming or may come should be faxed to the Fisheries Managing Editor.

 

The Annual Meeting web site should be developed by the AFS office and approved by the General Meeting Chair and the Executive Director and be ready to go live right after the previous year’s annual meeting.  It will housed on the AFS web site and access given to the designated chair.  The AFS webmaster and the local webmaster will be able to make changes.  AFS will maintain the online registration site.

 

During the Meeting

 

Ensure that the media room is kept clean; has pitchers of water; has phone and fax information clearly indicated; has media kits, chairs, pens, paper, and any updated information that needs posting (changed room assignments, altered speaker times); and follows the open-closed schedule for media room hours.  A sign on the door should indicate times and give a contact name and number for after-hours questions.

 

Legitimate media reps (establish their credentials first) are to be issued complimentary registrations.  They are required to wear a name tag showing their affiliation to have access to all events.  They must check in at the registration desk and be directed to the media room (or staff room if no media room is available) for additional materials and assistance.  Then, let them do their jobs!

 

After the Meeting

 

A press release should be sent after the conference to local media, reporters unable to attend the meeting but who expressed interest, and others who may be appropriate.  The release summarizes the key points in plenary sessions, announces passage of any AFS resolutions, and generally highlights newsworthy events and information at the meeting.

 

The media liaison and AFS Fisheries Managing Editor should clip any meeting-generated articles from publications and should note any interviews with broadcast reporters.  Copies should be sent to the AFS office, officers, and organizing committee.

 

The media liaison and organizing committee should note any media problems (i.e., poor location of media room) that might be avoided by the following year’s meeting committee.

 

Key Media Considerations

 

1.   Abstracts of all speeches and technical papers will be reviewed by the Program Committee in advance of the meeting to assess those for which news releases should be developed.  News releases will be requested from selected session chairs and presenters in advance of the meeting to permit creation of a meeting publicity packet.  Copies of speeches which may be in demand during the meeting should be sent to Fisheries Managing Editor for duplication and distribution.

 

2.   Scheduled dignitaries should have high priority for releases, interviews, and pictures.  It is requested that the host organization provide a staff photographer (complimentary if possible) for the meeting.

 

3.   News media representatives within reasonable proximity of the meeting site should be sent publicity packets and an invitation to attend the meeting free.

 

4.   The Publicity Subcommittee must work in close liaison with Fisheries Managing Editor and with the Executive Director.

 

5.   The Publicity Subcommittee will be responsible for providing any special press equipment in the meeting office.

 

6.   The Subcommittee Chair will be responsible for preparing a complete report of activities to the GMC at the close of the meeting.

 

Trade Show Subcommittee

 

The GMC should appoint a Trade Show Coordinator to work with the AFS staff Trade Show

Coordinator or contractor on arrangements for commercial and AFS exhibits.

 

1.   The AFS office or contractor handles brochure development, promotion, mailings; handles the booth reservation forms,  booth assignments, and all related correspondence; handles booth payments; approves and signs all contracts; solicits proposals  for pipe and drape, drayage, security, etc.; works closely with facility staff on floor plans, equipment and table needs, etc.; and assists with on-site management of the show.  The local trade show coordinator assists in attracting regional exhibitors to the show.  AFS will develop a budget and both parties will serve as floor-show managers.  The Trade Show contractor coordinates the needs of the local hosts regarding all equipment rented from the pipe and drape company (i.e., registration counters, poster boards, extra tables and chairs, information counters, etc.)

 

2.  The exhibit hall should have room for a minimum of 60, 10’x10’ commercial exhibits, a trade show registration booth, refreshment/coffee service, and space for several scattered refreshment tables (18,000 sq. ft.).  Space is also required for the following displays:  poster session (10,000 sq. ft.); raffle display (300 sq. ft.); AFS book display (300 sq. ft.); AFS booth (100 sq. ft.); local Chapter display (100 sq. ft.); and a display by the host of the next annual meeting (100 sq. ft.). Total: approximately 30,000 sq. ft.

 

When selecting a site for the trade show, other considerations include food and beverage service

(coffee is served in the show area twice a day; one social event/mixer is generally held in the

trade show area; lunch service should be made available to the exhibitors and attendees); security (is security provided or do you need guards?); location (it is desirable to have the trade show located near the technical sessions); insurance requirements, union rules, etc.

 

The trade show event should run 2.5 to 3 days.  Exhibitor move-in and tear-down require a half day each.  Each exhibitor is given two complimentary registrations.

 

Exhibitors want to be assured that the fee they have spent for the booth will result in sales!  As a “show manager” you should pay special attention to their needs and wishes.  Try to give meeting registrants ample time to visit the trade show.  Hosting coffee breaks, meals, and socials in the trade show hall are excellent ways to draw people into the show.  Provide exhibitors with listings of local sights, restaurants, and hotels so they can familiarize themselves with the area.  Have plenty of spare floor plans and exhibit location guides to hand out to trade show attendees.

Allow exhibitors to do demonstrations.  Consider possibilities for outdoor demos, especially for large equipment or if water is used.  Waterfront settings are ideal.

 

The Trade Show budget is separate from the Annual Meeting budget and is the responsibility of the AFS Office.

 

Tours, Transportation, and Information Subcommittee

 

The Tours, Transportation, and Information Subcommittee will be in charge of planning and arranging for all tours and field trips, needed transportation, and for operating an information desk adjacent to the meeting registration area.

 

The subcommittee is strongly urged to involve convention and visitor’s bureau and travel agency staffs in planning and promoting these events, and in operating the Information Desk.  The AFS Office will negotiate air and auto contracts.

 

1.   The subcommittee will be responsible for the hiring of buses, if needed, in connection with field trips and tours.  School buses are cheaper and are adequate for shorter trips.

 

2.   The subcommittee will keep accurate records of the number of people and number of buses used on each tour, and will submit invoices to the Budget and Finance Subcommittee for payment.

 

3.   The subcommittee chair will work closely with the Registration subcommittee, since all special event and tour ticket sales will be handled by the Registration Subcommittee.

 

4.   The subcommittee will determine and plan special events such as fishing trips, shows, etc. that may be of interest to meeting participants, spouses and companions, and will publicize such events in advance in coordination with Fisheries Managing Editor.

 

5.   Local guides (familiar with the sites to be toured and who have the ability to explain features)

should be provided if possible.

 

6.   Tour and trip schedules should be developed and the time of return should be announced.

 

7.   A phone at the message booth is very helpful and so is a nearby message board.

 

Welcome and Protocol Subcommittee

 

1.   The Welcoming and Protocol Subcommittee shall be responsible for making appropriate arrangements for greeting, hosting, and transporting meeting dignitaries as identified by the GMC, the AFS President, or the AFS Executive Director.  Duties also include working with the

 

AFS leadership and the host agency in making head table seating arrangements at any banquet, if such an arrangement is necessary.

 

2.   Arrangements should be made to have at least one vehicle available at all times to transport any guests or run emergency errands.

 

3.   If AFS staff is arriving in a large group, arrangements to welcome them and transport them to hotel are desirable.

 

4.   Plenary speakers should be welcomed and met at the airport.

 

Signs Subcommittee

 

This subcommittee will work with other subcommittees in the design and printing of signs, tickets, and place cards as needed during the meeting.  Signs for exhibitors and trade show- related events can be supplied by the same company that provides pipe and drape for the show or from a host agency which has printing facilities they are willing to make available.

 

This subcommittee will also be responsible for preparation of any directional or welcoming signs:

 

1.  Create signs outside each meeting room.

 

2.  Daily deliver signs to their correct locations.

 

3.  Have generic signs available so that changes can be posted at a moment’s notice.

 

Raffle Subcommittee

 

The Raffle budget is separate from the Annual Meeting budget.  Seventy percent (70%) of the proceeds go to the Skinner Fund and 30% go to the Student Unit that helps with the Raffle (solicitation of prizes; organization; etc.)

 

Guidelines and Suggestions For Promoting Diversity At AFS Conferences and Meetings

 

Draft (01/15/01) Compiled By the AFS Equal Opportunities Section

 

The Strategic Plan of the American Fisheries Society states that “AFS should strive to provide opportunities and vehicles to achieve diversity and create a climate in which diversity is welcomed, acknowledged and appreciated.” Certain aspects of AFS conferences can advance or deter our organization in reaching this goal. The following suggestions present a few ideas for providing a welcoming atmosphere at AFS functions. We encourage planning committees to develop additional means of fostering social and professional diversity at AFS meetings.

 

Planning committees and hosting

 

•     Include diverse representation on event planning committees and at registration booths.

 

•     Encourage symposia that address topics or are jointly sponsored by organizations related to professional and social diversity.

 

•     Include socially and professionally diverse representation in plenary sessions sponsored by the host unit, moderators, staff at the registration booth, and among panel speakers.

 

•     Avoid scheduling conflicts with major religious holidays. Facilities

•     Use facilities that are compliant with accessibility needs.

 

•     Offer services upon request such as large print publications, hearing devices or sign interpretation.

 

•     Consider providing child care at meetings or provide attendees with access to local services.

 

•     Use minority-owned businesses for printing or other services associated with the conference.

 

•     Offer multicultural foods at social events.

 

•     Use facilities located in areas that are welcoming to diverse cultural and social groups and provide ready access to international airports.

 

Presentations

 

•     Avoid comments, including jokes, by meeting moderators that promote or denigrate religious, ethnic, racial, or gender-based characteristics and which use buzzwords, stereotypes, biases or generalizations that are not integral to fisheries topics or that assume all participants hold the same views (e.g., leading a communal prayer before a banquet may feel exclusionary to some participants; addressing the role of religion and spirituality in cultural perspectives on use of fish would be appropriate within the context of a symposium or plenary session).

 

•     Provide visual images that reflect social and professional diversity in all publications related to

 

promotion or documentation of the conference.

 

•     Encourage symposia that provide a balanced exploration of the role of religious, spiritual, ethnic, gender, disciplinary or other diversity perspectives in development of fisheries ethics, research, conservation, and management. Employ an inclusive and creative approach to discussions of the religious, spiritual, ethnic, gender, and disciplinary issues beyond traditional assumptions about what or whom these issues encompass. Use professional facilitation services and approaches to maintain respect and constructive structure in sensitive discussions.

 

•     Units can offer travel assistance to nontraditional speakers and panel participants. Do not

 

limit potential speakers to “professionals.” Many “non-professionals” can offer good insights but

often do not have any agency or sponsor funding. Be willing to take time to work with non-traditional speakers explaining the purpose of a meeting and how they can contribute. The AFS audience also needs to respect divergent points of view and be willing to hear people speak from experience and not in jargon typical for the fisheries professional.

 

•  Provide tours of facilities that reflect a variety of social and cultural contributions to fisheries.

 

•  Provide an opportunity for agencies and organizations to share ideas or information that reach diverse audiences (e.g., a literature booth in which organizations could display brochures written in different languages or cultural perspectives).

 

Registration and participant services

 

•  Provide a voluntary means of identifying first-lime participants and international guests (e.g., on name tags) so that those individuals can be sought out and welcomed by seasoned participants.

 

•  Provide a service whereby individuals can find roommates for conferences, especially for students, first-time participants, and international guests.

 

•  Develop a “language bank” by allowing registrants to indicate if they speak a language other than

English and could be matched with international participants.

 

•  Prominently promote events related to enhancing and welcoming diversity in announcements and publications for the conference (e.g., travel scholarships for students, minorities and women; mentoring events; social mixers focused on students, minorities and women).

 

•  Attempt timely resolution of all complaints related to bias, discrimination or facility needs.

 

Levels of Support – American Fisheries Society Annual Meeting

 

 

 

Level 1 Titanium Level…………………………………………………………………………….$15,000

Certificate of appreciation

Sponsorship acknowledged in Program Sponsorship acknowledged in AFS Fisheries Sponsorship acknowledged publicly at meeting Logo on Spawning Run T shirt

Opportunity to insert material in official meeting bag

Name on meeting bag

Ad in Fisheries (1/2 page) Publicity through press releases

Trade Show booth with 2 complimentary registrations

Link on AFS Web Site

AFS Mailing list of 10,000 names

 

Level 2 Platinum Level……………………………………………………………………………..$ 10,000

Certificate of appreciation

Sponsorship acknowledged in Program Sponsorship acknowledged in AFS Fisheries Sponsorship acknowledged publicly at meeting Logo on Spawning Run T shirt

Opportunity to insert material in official meeting bag

Name on meeting bag

Ad in Fisheries (1/2 page) Publicity through press releases

Trade Show booth with 2 complimentary registrations

Link on AFS Web Site

 

Level 3 Gold Level………………………………………………………………………………………$ 5,000

Certificate of appreciation

Sponsorship acknowledged in Program Sponsorship acknowledged in AFS Fisheries Sponsorship acknowledged publicly at meeting Logo on Spawning Run T shirt

Opportunity to insert material in official meeting bag

Name on meeting bag

Ad in Fisheries (1/4 page)

 

Level 4 Silver Level……………………………………………………………………………………. $ 2,500

Certificate of appreciation

Sponsorship acknowledged in Program Sponsorship acknowledged in AFS Fisheries Sponsorship acknowledged publicly at meeting Logo on Spawning Run T shirt

 

Opportunity to insert material in official meeting bag

 

Level 5 Bronze Level………….

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AMERICAN FISHERIES SOCIETY PROCEDURES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adopted by the Governing Board of the American Fisheries Society

 

October 30, 2006

 

Last updated October 24, 2013

 

PREFACE

 

 

Procedures are the lowest level of formal documentation of AFS operations.  The Constitution and Rules are higher and they are described in the Constitution. Procedures are intended to remind AFS volunteers and staff of what to do and how to do it.

 

This was a major revision. The last “procedural manual” was published in 1992.  Since then there have been many changes and the manual was not revised to keep up.  The Constitution and Rules have been revised and substantial changes were made in governance such as the creation

of the Management Committee.  This committee hopes that Procedure updates will be a routine part of Governing Board and Committee business.  The new document will only be available electronically so revisions can be made easily.

 

The old Procedural Manual included a mix of general information and procedures.  This revision attempted to remove the general information from procedures.  A “Unit Survival Manual” also exists that includes a wide range of information.  The information removed from the old Procedural Manual is going to be added to the Unit Survival Manual (USM).  Concurrently an update will be made to the USM.

 

Respectfully Submitted,

 

Special Committee on Society Procedures.  Dirk Miller, Chair, Ira Adelman, Mary

Fabrizio, Carolina Franco, Fred Harris, Joe Margraf, Gus Rassam, and Gwen White

 

September 10, 2005 (original revision) Updates based on Governing Board approvals on:

September 14, 2006 (Lake Placid) March 10, 2007 (Atlanta) September 1, 2007 (San Francisco) March 8, 2008 (Annapolis)

August 16, 2008 (Ottawa) March 7, 2009 (Bethesda) August 29, 2009 (Nashville) September 3, 2011 (Seattle)

August 18, 2012 (Minneapolis/St. Paul) March 2, 2013 (Bethesda)

September 7, 2013 (Little Rock)

 

Table of Contents

 

SOCIETY OFFICERS …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 1

General Responsibilities of All Officers…………………………………………………………………………. 1

Sample MOU for Service as an American Fisheries Society Officer………………………………….. 4

Executive Director Succession Plan ………………………………………………………………………………. 7

Performance Evaluation of the Executive Officer ……………………………………………………………. 9

Purpose…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 12

Composition and Meetings …………………………………………………………………………………………. 12

Governing Board Meeting Agenda ………………………………………………………………………………. 13

Responsibilities of Governing Board Members……………………………………………………………… 14

Management Committee …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 15

Conflict of Interest Policy and Procedures ……………………………………………………………………. 17

Conflict of Interest – Disclosure Form ……………………………………………………………………… 19

Guidelines for Preparation of Reports to the Governing Board ……………………………………….. 23

Format for Governing Board Reports ……………………………………………………………………….. 24

Example Midyear Report to the Governing Board ……………………………………………………… 26

Procedures for Electronic Voting ………………………………………………………………………………… 28

DIVISIONS………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 32

Purposes …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 32

Officers and Duties ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 32

Standing Committees …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 34

SECTIONS ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 35

Purposes …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 35

Officers and Duties ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 36

Standing Committees …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 37

CHAPTERS AND OTHER UNITS ………………………………………………………………………………… 38

Purposes …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 39

Officers and Duties ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 40

Standing Committees …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 41

STANDING AND SPECIAL COMMITTEES …………………………………………………………………. 42

Responsibilities of Committee Chairs ………………………………………………………………………….. 43

Responsibilities of Committee Members………………………………………………………………………. 46

Purposes, Composition, and Duties of Standing Committees ………………………………………….. 47

Arrangements Committee ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 47

Audit Committee……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 48

Awards Committee ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 49

Board of Appeals …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 50

Board of Professional Certification…………………………………………………………………………… 51

Constitutional Consultant………………………………………………………………………………………… 53

Continuing Education Committee…………………………………………………………………………….. 53

Electronic Services Advisory Board …………………………………………………………………………. 55

Endangered Species Committee ………………………………………………………………………………. 56

Ethics and Professional Conduct Committee……………………………………………………………… 57

External Affairs Committee …………………………………………………………………………………….. 57

Liaisons ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 58

 

Investment Committee ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 59

Meeting Oversight Committee…………………………………………………………………………………. 59

Membership Committee………………………………………………………………………………………….. 60

Names of Aquatic Invertebrates Committee ………………………………………………………………. 61

Names of Fishes Committee ……………………………………………………………………………………. 61

New Initiatives Coordinator…………………………………………………………………………………….. 62

Nominating Committee…………………………………………………………………………………………… 63

Past Constitutional Consultant’s Advisory Council ……………………………………………………. 65

Past Presidents’ Advisory Council……………………………………………………………………………. 65

Program Committee ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 66

Publications Award Committee (See also Awards section of Procedures) …………………….. 66

Publications Overview Committee …………………………………………………………………………… 68

Raffle Committee …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 69

Resolutions Committee …………………………………………………………………………………………… 69

Resource Policy Committee…………………………………………………………………………………….. 72

Time and Place Committee ……………………………………………………………………………………… 73

Vote Auditor …………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 73

SOCIETY AWARDS ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 75

OPERATIONAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES …………………………………………………………. 86

Developing and Advancing AFS Positions on Resource Issues ……………………………………….. 87

Procedures for Developing and Advancing Resource Policy Statements ………………………. 88

Procedures for Submitting, Considering, and Implementing Resolutions ………………………. 93

Society Advocacy and Unit Procedures …………………………………………………………………….. 94

Lobbying Information and Guidelines ………………………………………………………………………. 97

Publications Policies ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 98

A.  Comprehensive Publications Policy…………………………………………………………………….. 98

B.  Publications Policy-Symposium Series………………………………………………………………. 101

C. Recruitment, Review, and Retention of Editors……………………………………………………. 102

Continuing Education Courses ………………………………………………………………………………….. 105

Topic-Oriented Meetings (TOMs) ……………………………………………………………………………… 106

Topic Oriented Hill Seminars ……………………………………………………………………………………. 109

Meeting Support ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 111

PROGRAM PLANNING AND FINANCIAL PLANNING……………………………………………… 113

A.  Definitions……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 113

B.  Financial Policies ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 113

C.  Possible Financial Pitfalls ………………………………………………………………………………… 116

Investment Objectives and Guidelines ……………………………………………………………………….. 116

Planned Giving Program…………………………………………………………………………………………… 123

New Initiatives ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 126

Disaster Relief…………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 130

Fisheries Conservation Foundation ……………………………………………………………………………. 134

ANNUAL MEETING GUIDELINES ……………………………………………………………………………. 137

Foreword ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 137

Bidding for an Annual Meeting …………………………………………………………………………………. 137

Tips for Successful Submissions ……………………………………………………………………………. 137

Remuneration ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 138

 

Suggested Timeline………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 138

Two Years Out …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 138

Year Before The Meeting ……………………………………………………………………………………… 139

Year Of The Meeting ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 142

Annual Meeting Structure And Organization ………………………………………………………………. 149

Local Arrangements ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 151

Accommodations Subcommittee ………………………………………………………………………… 154

Audio Visual Aids Subcommittee ………………………………………………………………………. 155

Registration Subcommittee ………………………………………………………………………………… 156

Budget and Finance Subcommittee …………………………………………………………………….. 157

Fundraising Subcommittee ………………………………………………………………………………… 158

Social Activities, & Entertainment Subcommittee ………………………………………………… 159

Program Committee ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 160

Printing Subcommittee………………………………………………………………………………………. 162

Publicity Subcommittee …………………………………………………………………………………….. 163

Trade Show Subcommittee ………………………………………………………………………………… 166

Tours, Transportation, and Information Subcommittee………………………………………….. 167

Welcome and Protocol Subcommittee…………………………………………………………………. 167

Signs Subcommittee………………………………………………………………………………………….. 168

Raffle Subcommittee ………………………………………………………………………………………… 168

Guidelines and Suggestions For Promoting Diversity At AFS Conferences and Meetings … 169

Levels of Support – American Fisheries Society Annual Meeting …………………………………. 171

 

SOCIETY OFFICERS

 

 

Leadership of the American Fisheries Society is vested in its six officers.  These include five

(non-salaried) officers elected by society-wide voting and a sixth (salaried) officer, the Executive Director, chosen by the Governing Board.  The five elected offices are Second Vice-President, First Vice-President, President-Elect, President, and Immediate Past President.

 

Officers generally serve the Society for five years, moving progressively through the hierarchy of officer positions.  This structure assures a continuity of leadership and assures that each person understands the full operation of the Society before taking the most important office of AFS President.

 

Offices of Immediate Past-President and AFS President are filled automatically by the current AFS President and President-Elect, respectively.  Offices of President-Elect, First Vice- President, and Second Vice-President are filled by a ballot election each year.  Generally the ballot lists only the current First Vice-President as candidate for President-Elect and only the current Second Vice-President as candidate for First Vice-President.  Candidates for Second Vice-President are chosen in one of two ways, through the Nominating Committee (which operates each year) or through petition.

 

If necessary a memorandum of understanding must be signed between the government agency of the AFS officer and AFS.  An example of such an MOU is presented below.

 

General Responsibilities of All Officers

 

The specific descriptions of officers’ duties, on the following pages and in the following chapters, emphasize the required operational duties.  The most important responsibility, however, is to provide leadership to the Society and the profession.  During the five years an elected officer serves, this person must be a trustworthy, objective, and effective representative of the profession.  As a representative for the members, each Society officer must represent the

worldwide concerns of fisheries professionals.  They must use their knowledge and experience to direct the profession in ways that will have long-term beneficial influence for the resources and people important to our Society.

 

All officers are members of the Governing Board and are expected to attend all meetings and represent Society-level concerns.  They must be thoroughly familiar with the Constitution, Rules, Procedures and other programs and policies of the Society.  Additionally, they must understand fully the financial and operating status of the Society in order to explain these aspects to members.

 

Society officers, along with unit officers, are a major conduit for expression of member concerns to the Governing Board and the Society staff.  As such, they must communicate broadly with members of all backgrounds and professional employment.  They must seek opportunities to meet with Society members and listen to their interests and concerns.

 

Elected officers are fully engaged on a daily basis with AFS affairs and as such, they bring Society-level perspectives and insights to the mix of Division and Section perspectives on the Management Committee and the Governing Board.  The elected officer hierarchy serves to enhance the networking, relationship building, and understanding of each officer through

 

participation as members of the Management Committee, the Governing Board, and the membership at large.

 

Although a time commitment has never been assigned to these responsibilities, it is expected that Society officers will reduce their involvement in other professional activities to a low level, including their participation in AFS unit activities.  Furthermore, it is expected that the

employers of Society officers will consider their AFS responsibilities as a major component of their work and protect them from ancillary or short-notice work assignments as fully as possible.

 

Each officer has specific responsibilities, as described in Article III C of the Constitution and elsewhere in these Procedures.  Specific responsibilities of individual officers include:

 

President

1.   Makes appointments, including standing committees, as authorized by the

Constitution;

2.   Establish and appoint special committees and consultants as required;

3.   Exercise responsibilities arising from actions of the Society and the Governing Board;

4.   Chairs all Society, Governing Board, and Management Committee meetings;

5.   Provides direction to the Executive Director when the Governing Board is not in session;

6.   Contributes a “President’s Hook” monthly for inclusion in Fisheries;

7.   Prepares reports of Society activities and status to the Governing Board for the mid- year and annual meetings of the Governing Board, and to the Society for the annual meeting;

8.   Contributes to the annual Society Meeting by planning the Plenary Session,

overseeing Local Arrangements and Program committees, working with Society staff; advancing the theme for meeting; and coordinating attendance of officers at various meetings;

9.   Collaborates with the President-elect in development of Governing Board retreat held in conjunction with the annual Society meeting; and

10. Oversees the evaluation of the Executive Director and negotiates the contract of the

Executive Director.

 

President-elect

1.   Assumes the duties of the President when that officer is temporarily or permanently

unable to act;

2.   Serves as a voting member of the Governing Board and Management Committee;

3.   Selects the Chair of the Local Arrangements Committee for the annual Society meeting two years hence and serves on the Arrangements Committee and Program Committee for that meeting;

4.  Serves on the following committees in the manner stated:

(1) Carl R. Sullivan Fishery Conservation Award Committee, Chair; (2) Distinguished Service Award Committee, Chair;

(3) Membership Committee, Member;

(4) Resource Policy Committee, Member;

(5) Electronic Services Advisory Board, Member; (6) Publications Overview Committee, Member;

 

5.  Participates in routine communications regarding Society business conducted by the

President and Executive Director.

 

First Vice-president

1.   Assumes the duties of the President-elect when that officer is temporarily unable to

act and serve;

2.   Serves as a voting member of the Governing Board and Management Committee:

3.   Works to form the Local Arrangements Committee annual Society meeting three years hence;

4.   Serves on the following committees in the manner stated: (1) Awards Committee, Chair;

(2) Membership Committee, Chair;

(3) Carl R. Sullivan Conservation Award Committee, Member; (4) Ethics and Professional Conduct Committee, Member;

(5) Resolutions Committee, Member.

 

Second Vice-president

1.   Assumes the duties of the First Vice-president when that officer is temporarily unable

to act and serve;

2.   Serves as a voting member of the Governing Board and Management Committee;

3.   Selects the Chair of the Program Committee for the annual Society meeting four years hence;

4.   Serves on the following committees in the manner stated: (1) Membership Committee, Vice-chair;

(2) Board of Appeals, Member;

(3) Meritorious Service Award Committee, Member; (4) Time and Place Committee, Member.

 

Immediate Past-president

1.  Serves as a voting member of the Governing Board and Management Committee;

2.  Conducts annual Executive Director evaluation and interviews of Society staff;

3.  Serves on the following committees in the manner stated: (1) Past President’s Advisory Council, Chair;

(2) President’s Fishery Conservation Award Committee, Chair;

(3) William E. Ricker Resource Conservation Award Committee, Chair; (4) Retired Members Travel Award Committee, Chair;

(5) Nominating Committee, Member.

 

Sample MOU for Service as an American Fisheries Society Officer

 

MEMORANDUM

 

 

 

To:                      Jeff Hardgrove, Region 1 Employee Relations Specialist From:            Carl Burger, Director, Abernathy Technology Center Subject:   MOU for Service as Officer, American Fisheries Society Date:     December 11, 1998

Please find attached the Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the American Fisheries Society (AFS), customized for my service as an officer in the Society.  This may well be the MOU you referred to in our telephone discussion today.  I used the same instrument when I was President of the Society’s Western Division in 1994, and have basically updated it to reflect my present (First Vice-President) and future annual positions (President-Elect; AFS President; and Immediate Past President) at the AFS national level.  I believe that Dan Raisovich (former Ethics Counselor in the Service’s previous Research Division; Region 8) developed this MOU and process so that Service Fish and Wildlife Biologists could serve as officers in professional societies.

 

I am attaching two signed originals of the MOU should the Service and the Society each wish to retain one.  In a past discussion with Paul Brouha (former Executive Director of AFS), he indicated he had spoken with the Service’s Deputy Ethics Counselor and the consensus was that an exemption should be requested so that I may complete my service as an AFS elected officer. If an exemption is needed, I would certainly like to request that it be initiated.

 

I have discussed this matter with my present supervisor (Mr. Dan Diggs, Region 1 PARD- Fisheries), who I am copying with this correspondence.  Previously, I briefed Bill Shake

(GARD) and Chuck Dunn (former supervisor).  All have expressed support for my ongoing AFS

service because of the varied benefits and opportunities it provides to each party.

 

Please advise should further details be required, or if any changes are needed to the MOU. Thanks for your assistance,

 

 

Carl V. Burger

 

Abernathy Salmon Culture Technology Center

 

1440 Abernathy Road Longview, WA 98632 (360) 425-6072

(360) 636-1855 FAX

 

cc: Dan Diggs, PARD-Fisheries

 

Memorandum of Understanding between the

Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Department of the Interior and the

American Fisheries Society

 

 

 

I. Purpose

 

The purpose of the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is to establish guidelines and organizational arrangements that will provide a cooperative working relationship between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) and the American Fisheries Society (Society) with respect to employees of the Service serving as officers of the Society.  This MOU will serve to define the conditions, procedures, limits, and benefits of such professional service to the Service and the Society by Service employees.

 

II. Background and Authorities

 

The Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, is charged with the responsibility for carrying out programs relating to fish and wildlife throughout the nation in accordance with the Fish and Wildlife Act of 1956 (16 U.S.C. 661-667(e)), as amended; and other authorities.

 

The Society is incorporated as a professional, not-for-profit organization to promote the conservation, development, and wise use of fishery resources; promote and evaluate the development and advancement of all branches of fishery science and practice; gather and disseminate to the Society and the general public scientific, technical, and other information about fishery science and practice through publications, meetings, and other forms of communications; and encourage the teaching of fishery science and practice in colleges and universities and continuing professional development of fishery workers.

 

The Service and Society recognize the compatibility of their purposes and responsibilities and

the need to cooperate on matters of mutual interest.  Professional service of Service employees in Society leadership positions will be beneficial to both natural resource agencies/organizations and, more importantly, to the people and fishery resources of the United States.

 

A.  Benefits to the Service

 

In this position, Carl V. Burger will interact with a diversity of fishery resource managers including directors of State and Federal fishery agencies and fishery constituency groups. He will also be required to achieve a high level of performance from colleagues who volunteer to assist the Fish and Wildlife Service and the Society.  These experiences and training provided by the Society at Annual and Mid-Year Governing Board meetings will increase Carl V. Burger’s leadership skills.  These skills will benefit the Service in Carl’s performance of tasks in his present and future positions with the Service.

 

In this position, Carl V. Burger will be aware of contemporary fishery management issues, programs, and trends nationwide.  This awareness will be passed to the Service and allow the Service to appropriately set and manage programs to remain a leader in fishery resource management.  Carl V. Burger’s contacts with diverse fishery managers and fishery administrators will ensure, as appropriate, Service input and involvement in

 

fishery management issues and programs.  These contacts will also provide opportunities for input and feedback from professional fishery resource managers that can be used to fine-tune present and future Service fishery management programs.

 

Lastly, Carl V. Burger’s active involvement with the Society and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service demonstrates to the fishery management community the Service’s active interest and concern for the conservation and management of the nation’s fishery resources.

 

B.  Benefits to the Society

 

The Society will benefit from Carl V. Burger’s service and administrative support provided by the Service to perform the duties of Society 1st VP, President-Elect, AFS President, and Immediate Past President.

 

III.  Terms of Agreement

 

A.  Pursuant to this MOU, the Service and the Society agree that the service of Carl V. Burger as 1st VP, President-Elect, AFS President, and Immediate Past President of the Society and as a member of the American Fisheries Society, will be of mutual benefit.

 

B.  The Service authorizes Carl V. Burger to conduct routine business of his Society office during normal working hours, to use Service communication equipment and services in the conduct of Society business, to use secretarial services from the Service, and to travel to meetings and other official Society functions during working hours and at Service expense, in so far as such activity does not unduly interfere with the accomplishment of the duties and responsibilities of his position and other Service business.

 

C.  The Society will provide Carl V. Burger with office supplies as needed for Society business.

 

D.  The Society recognizes the primacy of Service policies and positions as guiding principles for Carl’s official actions and decisions in any situation where there is a potential for conflict between Service and Society positions and policies.  The employee shall excuse himself from being a party to any issue of the Society that could be construed as a conflict of interest with his official duties and responsibilities as a Service employee.

 

IV.  Effective Dates

 

This MOU will become effective upon signature of the approving officials of the respective agencies/organizations entering into the MOU.  The terms of this MOU will remain in effect until completion of Carl V. Burger’s tenure as 1st VP, President-Elect, AFS President, and Immediate Past President in September, 2002.  This MOU may be terminated at any time by mutual agreement or by 30-day advance written notice by either party.

 

SIGNATURE BLOCKS

 

Executive Director Succession Plan

 

Background

The American Fisheries Society employs an Executive Director who serves as the Secretary and

Treasurer of the Society, and manages the Society’s daily activities, implements Society policies and advances Society objectives as set forth in the Constitution, Rules and Procedures, and in Governing Board directives. The AFS Governing Board establishes the base salary, other compensation, and duties of the Executive Director, whereas the Executive Director establishes the base salaries and other compensation for other Society staff (AFS Constitution and Rules, September 1, 2009).

 

Refer to the AFS Strategic Plan for a summary of other issues in the current environment that also may affect AFS leadership in the future.

 

Succession Planning (adapted from Wolfred 2008, with excerpts as noted)

 

Succession planning is a risk management practice that is critical to ensuring the viability of an organization such as AFS. A governing board can be both energized and reassured by succession planning, which provides the opportunity for high-level strategy development. Many nonprofit organizations are led by executives who are Baby Boomers, and the next generation of leaders may have new ideas and ways of conducting business for organizations. The leaders from the Generation X and Generation Y that will most likely take over leadership positions may seek to restructure the role of executive director to fit the lifestyle of those generations that seek a

healthy balance between work life and personal life, and that work toward shared or collaborative leadership.

 

There are three approaches to succession planning: 1) strategic leader development, 2) emergency succession planning, and 3) departure-defined succession planning. Strategic leader development, which should be an ongoing effort for all professionals, focuses on and defines the strategic vision of an organization, identifies leadership and management needed to carry out the vision, and recruits and maintains individuals who have or want to develop those skills. Emergency succession planning is used when an executive director or other leader have an unplanned departure. Departure-defined succession planning is used when a long-term leader announces their departure two or more years in advance. This type of planning identifies the organization’s goals for the future, determines the information or tools needed to achieve those goals, and devotes attention to building capacity of the organization to sustain funding and programs for the future. The third type of succession planning represents the strategy AFS needs to adopt under the current situation, although elements of the other plans should be considered.

 

Departure–defined succession planning is recommended for organizations with long-tenured executive directors with definite departure dates. At least 18 months of preparation are required prior to the scheduled departure. The goal of this planning effort is to build leadership strength and help facilitate a successful search for new leadership by assessing the organization’s traits, resources and their status. The departing executive director should consider questions about his legacy, future career plans, and personal finances. The departing executive director’s final two leadership tasks are the “leadership of letting go” and the “leadership of preparing the way.” An

 

organization also must let go of their executive director, offering a full and generous goodbye. A critical first step is to conduct a “sustainability audit,” which is a survey of administrative operations and resource relationships. This audit identifies key points of organizational vulnerability that could inhibit organization functioning. High-risk situations are when the executive director has taken on “whatever needs to be done,” which results in the equivalent of the executive performing more than one job and replacing him nearly impossible. This situation may require an administrative restructuring, which could include the creation of a new management position to assume some of the functions of the current executive. The organization should look at how leadership can be cooperatively shared throughout the organization to reduce dependency on the executive and take advantage of staff development opportunities. The successor will thrive if he inherits a doable job description with a competent team that shares management and leadership responsibilities. To accomplish succession planning, an special committee should be appointed and act on behalf of the governing board to provide oversight of the succession planning process and craft a succession plan for the board to review and approve.

 

Wolfred recommends that when creating a succession plan for a long-term executive, an organization should consider the following activities, which address the elements critical that will facilitate the success of the next executive director. Wolfred’s list of “The Nuts and Bolts of Departure-Defined Succession Planning” is the following:

 

1.   Deal with personal and professional barriers for the departing ED, for example:

  • Future employability concerns;
    • Inadequate retirement savings;
    • Unfinished business in the current job; and/or
    • Loss of identity and status attached to current job.

2.   Set the departure date after discussion and in agreement with the departing ED.

3.   Form a Succession Planning Committee.

4.   Prepare a communications plan (how soon to tell whom and by what means).

5.   Identify organizational vulnerabilities via a “sustainability audit.”

6.   Design and implement strategies to address the vulnerabilities.

7.   Identify the organization’s broad strategic directions three to five years out.

8.   Solidify the management team in light of organizational vulnerabilities and skills demanded by the strategic directions.

9.   Build the Board’s leadership abilities.

10. Back-up key executive relationships.

11. Put finances in order.

12. Build financial reserves and secure multi-year program funding.

13. Agree on the parameters of the ED’s emeritus role, if one is set up.

14. Set the executive search strategy, i.e., decide whether or not to use an executive recruiter.

 

Succession Readiness Checklist

Wolfred states that, “When the following conditions are in place, an organization can expect a

relatively smooth transition to new leadership whenever it might occur. An organization might determine which elements below are lacking in its current operations and then create a

‘succession plan’ or ‘capacity building plan’ that prescribes activities and timelines for filling the

 

gaps. The organization is then ready for leadership transitions, foreseen or unforeseen.” Wolfred’s succession readiness checklist is:

 

  • A strategic plan is in place with goals and objectives for the near term (up to three years), including objectives for leadership talent development.
  • The board evaluates the executive director annually on general performance and achievement of strategic goals.
  • The board, based on its annual self-evaluation, is satisfactorily performing its major governance jobs—financial oversight, executive support and oversight, policy development, and strategic planning.
  • The executive’s direct reports, based on annual evaluations, are judged as solidly skilled for their positions.
  • The top management cohort, as a high performing team:

o Has a solid team culture in place in which members support one another and can reach decisions as a group efficiently and harmoniously;

o Shares leadership of the organization with the executive in having significant input to all major organization decisions;

o Can lead the organization in the absence of the executive; and

o Has authority to make and carry out decisions within their respective areas of

responsibility.

  • Another staff person or officer shares important external relationships (major donors, funders, community leaders) maintained by the executive.
  • A financial reserve is in place with a minimum of one-year operating capital.
    • Financial systems meet industry standards. Financial reports are up to date and provide the data needed by the board and senior managers responsible for the organization’s financial strength and viability.
    • Operational manuals exist for key administrative systems and are easily accessible and up to date.
    • Top program staff have documented their key activities in writing and have identified another staff person who can carry their duties in an emergency.

 

References and Resources

Wolfred, T. 2008. Building leaderful organizations: succession planning for nonprofits.

Executive Transition Monograph Series, Volume 6. The Annie E. Casey Foundation, Baltimore, Maryland.

 

 

Performance Evaluation of the Executive Officer

 

Purpose: This document serves as an outline for the process to be followed to complete the annual performance evaluation of the AFS Executive Director.

 

According to the wording of the current contract, the Society’s five elected officers will review the performance of the Executive Director each year at the Society’s annual meeting.  This evaluation will be based on performance criteria and goals provided in writing to the Executive Director at the beginning of the period under review. The performance grades are:

 

  • Exceeds expectations: exceeds expectations in all job elements.
  • Proficient:  meets all (may exceed in some) job elements.
    • Unsatisfactory: fails to meet one or more of the job elements without acceptable reason.

 

The AFS President will lead the annual performance evaluation with participation of all elected officers. The process will have several elements of documentation:

 

a.   Self-evaluation of Plan of Work performance by the Executive Director  (Due three- to-four weeks before Annual Meeting).

 

b.   Summary of strengths and weaknesses of staff management by office department heads (conducted and compiled by the Past President).

 

c.   Evaluation of Plan of Work performance by individual Governing Board members (AFS President will send a memo to Governing Board requesting comments submitted to the AFS President in advance, and reminding the Governing Board about the opportunity to provide comments at the in camera session of the annual Governing Board meeting).

 

The AFS President will collect evaluations and comments three-to-four weeks before Annual Meeting and submit a summary to the elected officers to review before the annual meeting.  At the annual meeting, the officers will assemble for a formal discussion of the evaluation, and prepare a summary evaluation and recommendation of performance grade.  Additional comments from Governing Board members will be solicited at an in camera session of the Governing

Board, and the AFS President will summarize the evaluation and recommendations of the officers.  Following discussion and additional feedback, the AFS President will share the summary evaluation and recommendation with the Executive Director, and a written summary will be placed in the Executive Director’s personnel file.

 

In all years, the AFS President will also lead a brief mid-term evaluation of the Executive Director with participation of the elected officers during the mid-term meeting of the Society.  At this time, the Governing Board will comment on performance of the Executive Director at an in camera session held during the mid-term meeting.  This information will be summarized by the AFS President and conveyed to the Executive Director to aid in defining items needing mid-term correction or in recognizing outstanding achievements.

 

Executive Director Salary Determination

 

Purpose: This document serves as an outline for the process to be followed to complete the salary negotiation with the AFS Executive Director.

 

The performance of the Executive Director will be reviewed each year by the Society’s five (5) elected Officers during the Society’s annual meeting. This evaluation will be based on performance criteria and goals provided in writing by the Executive Director and agreed to by

the Society’s Officers at the beginning of the period under review. Performance will generally be

judged on the following job elements:

 

  • Effectively manage the Society’s daily activities, business operations and staff

appointments as the Society’s Business Manager;

  • Accurately maintain the Society’s official records and communications as the Society’s

Secretary;

  • Exhibit a high degree of fiduciary responsibility in managing the Society’s financial

status and resources in the Executive’s role as the Society’s Treasurer;

  • Engage in and promote responsible and timely communication and information transfer among units, the membership, staff and other Society sponsored entities;
  • Provide leadership in achievement of the Society’s strategic direction according to

existing Strategic Plans.

 

Yearly performance grades are evaluated as follows:

 

 

  • Exceptional: exceeds expectation in all job elements involving the business, management, and leadership of the Society.
  • Proficient: meets expectations in all job elements with exceptional performance in at least some aspects.
  • Fully Satisfactory: meets expectations in all job elements.
    • Unsatisfactory: failure to meet one or more of the job elements without acceptable reason; six months will be allowed to improve performance, and failure to do so will result in cancellation of the Contract Agreement.

 

The salary of the Executive for each calendar year of the Contract Agreement will depend on the annual performance review by elected Officers, and the percentage cost-of-living adjustments (COLA) awarded to U.S. Federal executive employees in the Washington, D.C., area for that calendar year. A discretionary yearly salary increase of up to 5% of the previous year’s base salary may be awarded, based on performance relative to the Executive’s Annual Plan of Work. The new annual salary is calculated by applying the discretionary merit increase first, then the appropriate Washington, D.C., COLA (which includes the locality differential).

 

The Governing Board reviews and approves the annual budget which includes the Executive Director’s salary in the single budget line-item for personnel salaries (i.e., the Executive Director’s salary is not provided separately).

 

GOVERNING BOARD

 

Purpose

 

The Governing Board is the ultimate authority for the operation of the Society.  It is the equivalent of a board of directors, deciding policy for the Society, authorizing its operations, hiring its Executive Director, and making financial decisions.

 

Composition and Meetings

 

The Governing Board consists of voting and nonvoting members.  Voting members are the five elected Society officers, Presidents and Presidents-Elect of the four Divisions, and Presidents of all Sections with at least 50 members at the end of the previous calendar year.  Nonvoting members are Presidents of Sections with fewer than 50 members, the President of the Student Subsection of the Education Section, Presidents of Chapters, the Constitutional Consultant, and the Society’s Executive Director.

 

The Governing Board normally meets at three different times and two locations each year.  The two fall meetings occur in conjunction with the Society’s annual meeting.  They normally consist of a one-day meeting before the Society’s annual meeting and a one-half-day meeting at the end of the annual meeting; the latter (designated as the Incoming Governing Board Meeting) includes newly elected officers, new Division Presidents and Presidents-Elect, new Section Presidents,

and other representatives.  The third meeting is intended as a midyear meeting occurring one day in the spring at a location determined by the AFS President in consultation with the Executive Director.

 

The Society’s President chairs meetings of the Governing Board.  Each meeting is operated from an agenda prepared jointly by the Executive Director and the AFS President.   R obert’s  R ules  of  Order is the formal guideline for conduct of the meetings.

 

Meetings are open to the Society’s members, who may observe and participate in the discussions as guests recognized by the chair.  Guests may not vote or introduce agenda items.  The Governing Board may go into a closed (in camera) session (i.e., attended only by the Officers, Division and Section representatives, and the Constitutional Consultant) at any time to discuss personnel matters, but the chair must document and announce results of the closed session immediately after its conclusion. The Constitutional Consultant attends in camera sessions to provide advice on parliamentary procedure.

 

 

Member and nonmember parliamentary rights are summarized as follows:

 

Executive Director - nonvoting member, makes reports, cannot make motions, and does not attend in camera sessions due to possibility of personnel reviews being conducted.

 

Constitutional Consultant - nonvoting member, can raise agenda items but cannot make motions, and attends in camera sessions for parliamentary assistance.  As an Active Member, the Constitutional Consultant can make motions in the Society Annual Business Meeting.

 

Officers, Division Presidents and Presidents-Elect - voting member, can raise agenda items and make motions, and attends in camera sessions.

 

Section presidents – voting member if the section has at least 50 active members, can raise agenda items and make motions regardless of section size, and attends in camera sessions.

 

Chapter Presidents - nonvoting member, can raise and discuss agenda items as Governing Board members, cannot make motions, and does not attend in camera sessions. Chapters do not vote because they are represented on the board by two voting members from their Division.

 

 

President of the Student Subsection of the Education Section – nonvoting member, can raise and discuss agenda items as Governing Board members, cannot make motions, and does not attend in camera sessions.

 

Guests - nonmembers, nonvoting, cannot raise agenda items or make motions, does not attend in camera sessions, and can speak only if recognized by the Chair.

 

Committee chairs - gives reports, can make a motion only if they are also a member of the Governing Board (in a dual role). No second is needed regardless of Governing Board membership unless it is committee of one person.

 

 

 

Governing Board Meeting Agenda

 

Governing Board meetings normally cover a specified set of agenda items in addition to old and new business.  The following agenda items normally occur:

 

1.  Call to order by the AFS President

 

2.  AFS President’s remarks

 

3.  Determination of a quorum

 

4.  Introduction of guests and visitors

 

5.  Executive Director’s report

 

6.  Division reports

 

7.  Section reports

 

8.  Standing Committee reports

 

9.  Special Committee reports

 

10.  Auditor’s report (spring only)

 

11.  Other business

 

Responsibilities of Governing Board Members

 

The Governing Board agenda is characteristically long and substantive and successful completion of the meeting requires the conscientious effort of each member.  Committee members have a dual responsibility of representing their constituents (i.e., the Chapter, Division, or Section members that elected them) and representing the Society as a whole.  This is a sensitive role that requires a long-term image of what AFS and the fisheries profession can and should be.  The importance of this group and each member, voting and nonvoting, cannot be overemphasized. In 2013, a motion was approved to delegate additional authority to the Management Committee to facilitate the Governing Board’s ability to focus on issues involving strategic planning, accountability, and the President’s plan of work. Even with this delegated authority, the Management Committee would continue to report to the Governing Board on all decisions; however, the Governing Board, with majority approval, would retain the ability to discuss any of these decisions.

 

Each member of the Governing Board (other than Chapter Presidents) has the following specific responsibilities:

 

1.  Attend the two fall meetings (second meeting being the Incoming Governing Board Meeting immediately following Annual Business Meeting) and the spring meeting of the committee, without financial compensation from AFS.

 

2.  If attendance is impossible, appoint an alternate.  The alternate must be appointed as stated in Article IV, paragraph 1.C of the Constitution.

 

3.  Read the agenda and accompanying documents thoroughly before arriving at the meeting, noting areas of special interest for discussion.

 

4.  If appropriate, prepare a report of the unit represented according to the guidelines described elsewhere in these Procedures and orally summarize the report at the meeting.

 

5.  Confer with unit officers, Governing Board, and members to determine their opinions regarding agenda items so that discussion and voting will be as representative of the membership as possible.

 

6.  Submit additional agenda items to the AFS President and Executive Director before or as soon as the call for reports is received.  All suggested agenda items must be accompanied by background materials and be prepared approximately in the form described elsewhere in the Procedures.

 

7.  At the Governing Board meeting, assure that all important information concerning an agenda item is heard, but that redundancy is eliminated.  It is counterproductive for each person to speak on each item or for any item to be acted on without full discussion.

 

8.  Review  R obert’s  R ule s  o f Order, which is the basis for Governing Board operation. Expect to be ruled out-of-order for failing to follow these rules.

 

9.  Recognize that a motion and second are needed before a topic can be discussed. Extended exploratory discussions are not permissible and, more importantly, are not practical as part of an extensive agenda.

 

10.  Remain attentive while the Committee is in session.  Expect to be reprimanded by the chair for disruptive or discourteous behavior.

 

11.  Report the results of Governing Board actions to the unit’s members and especially

to those persons (e.g., committee chairs) directly affected by those actions.

 

 

Management Committee

 

The Management Committee functions as an Executive Committee of the Governing Board, monitoring society activities to ensure that policies and plans approved by the Governing Board are implemented appropriately and guiding the Executive Director in these endeavors.  The Management Committee reviews the Executive Director’s proposed budget and makes recommendations for Governing Board approval. Beginning in 2013, the Management Committee has the authority to decide routine issues without seeking Governing Board approval. The Management Committee reports to the Governing Board on all decisions; however, the Governing Board, with majority approval, retains the ability to discuss any of these decisions.

 

The Management Committee comprises the following:

 

  • AFS President (chair), President-elect, First Vice-President, Second Vice-President, and

Immediate Past-president.

 

  • The presidents of two Divisions and presidents-elect of the two alternative Divisions.

The presidents-elect remain on the Committee through their presidential year, usually attending four Management Committee meetings before rotating off the committee.  In the event an appointed Division officer moves from president-elect to president during the course of the year, the officer will retain her/his appointment to the Management Committee.  This ensures continuity of membership on the committee.  Typically, the

presidents-elect of the Southern Division and Northeast Division begin their service at the

Mid-Year meeting of odd-numbered years, while the presidents-elect of the Western and North Central Divisions begin their service in even-numbered years.

 

  • Four Division or Section members on the Governing Board (voting or not) elected at large by the Governing Board as voting members of the Management Committee; and

 

  • Executive Director, Constitutional Consultant and such others as the AFS President may appoint (nonvoting on the Governing Board and Management Committee).

In the event of unforeseen circumstances, voting members of the Management Committee may designate proxies for participation at the mid-year and annual meetings of the Management Committee.  Such proxies must be designated in writing 15 days prior to the meeting and provided to the Executive Director and President.

 

Responsibilities of Management Committee Members

 

While the Division representatives serve as a function of their office, appointees from sections are elected to this committee with the confidence of their colleagues on the Governing Board. As such, they are selected as individuals and are not automatically replaced by their successor if section officers change during the year. Appointees from sections have full voting privileges on Management Committee affairs, whether or not their section has a vote on the Governing Board.

 

The Management Committee communicates monthly via conference calls (as needed) at a time determined by the AFS President (e.g., the third Tuesday of the month, 1:00 pm Eastern Time) to discuss issues and through email as necessary. The AFS President will confirm scheduling of the calls (or cancel as appropriate), and establish call agendas.  Members of the Management Committee should submit agenda items no later than 10 days before a scheduled call.  Agendas should be provided by the AFS President to the Management Committee no later than one week prior to the call.  Agendas and subsequent discussion will focus on AFS policies and plans, particularly those with budgetary implications.  Management Committee members meet to conduct business during the mid-year meeting, typically held in early March, and at the annual meeting of the Society.  These meetings are generally held on the Thursday afternoon before the Governing Board retreat (Friday) and the Governing Board meeting (Saturday).  In the absence

of a Governing Board retreat, the Committee meets on Friday afternoon. The minutes from all

Management Committee meetings will be shared with the Governing Board.

 

During the mid-year and annual meetings, the Management Committee reviews the Executive Director’s proposed budget, approves routine motions, and makes recommendations for Governing Board approval when appropriate.  The budget review includes such things as: detailed consideration of the Executive Director’s proposed changes to dues, fees, and other charges for AFS services; recommendations to the Governing Board on any proposals with financial implications; a review of the status of the Reserve Fund; and guidance on the funding of New Initiatives.

 

The Management Committee, together with the Executive Director and the AFS Investment Committee, are responsible for ensuring the implementation of policy and guidelines in the Statement of Investment Policy and Objectives, which governs the management of AFS’ Long- Term Investments.  The Management Committee may recommend modification of the objectives and policies of this Statement and, if necessary, seek approval by the Governing Board.

 

When AFS units request seed money to support unit meetings, the Management Committee is authorized to approve up to $10,000 for such requests (seed money is to be returned to AFS from the revenue of the meeting).

 

The Management Committee also reviews and recommends the President Elect’s Plan of Work

for approval by the Governing Board.

 

Conflict of Interest Policy and Procedures

 

 

The purpose of the following policy and procedures is to prevent the personal interests of the American Fisheries Society (AFS) officers, board members, or staff from interfering with the performance of their duties in AFS, or resulting in personal financial, professional, or political gain on the part of such persons at the expense of AFS or its members, supporters, and other stakeholders.

 

Definitions

 

1.  Conflict of Interest (also Conflict) means a conflict, or the perception or appearance of a conflict, between the personal private interests and official responsibilities of a person in a position of trust.  Persons in a position of trust include staff members, officers, and board members of AFS.

 

2.   Board means the AFS Governing Board.

 

3.   Officer means an elected or appointed officer of AFS.

 

4.   Staff Member or Employee (including adjunct staff) means a person who receives all or part of her/his income from payments made by AFS.

 

Policy

 

It is the policy of AFS that the Board, officers and employees are expected to avoid any actual or apparent conflict between their own personal interests and the interests of the Society. A conflict of interest can arise when a director, officer, or employee participates in decisions, takes actions, or has personal interests that may interfere with his or her objective and effective performance of work for the organization. For example, directors, officers and employees are expected to avoid actual or apparent conflict in dealings with members, suppliers, customers, competitors, government agencies, and other third parties.

 

Procedures

 

1.   Full  disclosure,  by  notice  in  writing,  shall  be  made  by  the  interested  parties  to  the Management Committee of the Board in all cases where conflicts of interest may exist, including but not limited to the following:

 

a.   An officer or board member is related to another officer, board member or staff member by blood, marriage or domestic partnership.

b.   A staff member in a supervisory capacity is related to another staff member whom she/he supervises.

c.   A board member, an organization in which the board member has an interest, or a staff member of such organization, stands to benefit from an AFS-related transaction or receives payment from AFS for any subcontract for goods or services other than as part

 

of  her/his  regular  job  responsibilities  or  as  reimbursement  for  reasonable  expenses incurred as provided in the bylaws and board policy.

 

2.   Following full disclosure of a possible conflict of interest or of any condition listed in item 1 above, the AFS Management Committee shall determine whether a conflict of interest exists and, if so, the Board shall vote to authorize or reject the transaction or take any other action deemed necessary to address the conflict and protect the best interests of AFS.  Both votes shall be by a majority vote without counting the vote of any interested director, even if the disinterested directors are less than a quorum, provided that at least one consenting director is disinterested. Any actions taken shall be reflected in the official minutes of the Management Committee and Board.

 

3.   A Board member who is formally considering employment with AFS must take a temporary leave of absence from the Board until the position is filled.  [This procedure also applies in the case of a relative of a Board member by blood, marriage or domestic partnership seeking employment with AFS.]  Such a leave will be taken within the Board member’s elected term, which will not be extended because of the leave.   A Board member who is formally considering employment with AFS [or is related to an individual seeking employment] must submit a written request for a temporary leave of absence to the Executive Director of AFS, c/o the AFS headquarters office, indicating the time period of the leave.  The Executive Director will inform the AFS President of such a request.   The President will bring the request to the Management Committee for action.  The request, and any actions taken, shall be reflected in the official minutes of the Management Committee and Board.

 

4.   An interested Board member, officer, or staff member shall not participate in any discussion or debate of the Management Committee or Governing Board, or of any committee or subcommittee  thereof,  in  which  the  subject  of  discussion  is  a  contract,  transaction,  or situation in which there may be a perceived or actual conflict of interest.  However, they may be present to provide clarifying information in such a discussion or debate unless objected to by any present Board or committee member.

 

5.   Anyone in a position to make decisions about spending AFS resources (i.e., transactions such as purchases or contracts) – who also stands to benefit from that decision – has a duty to disclose that conflict as soon as it arises (or becomes apparent); s/he should not participate in any final decisions on the action.

 

6.   A copy of this policy shall be given to all Board members and staff members upon its adoption  and/or  upon  commencement  of  such  person’s  relationship  with  AFS  or  at  the official adoption of stated policy.  Each Board member, officer and staff member shall sign and date the Conflict of Interest Disclosure Form upon its promulgation and/or at the beginning of her/his term of service or employment, and once each year thereafter.  Failure to sign does not nullify the policy.

 

This policy and disclosure form must be filed annually by all specified parties.

 

Document based on materials provided by the National Council of Nonprofit Associations

 

 

Conflict of Interest – Disclosure Form

 

 

This form must be filed annually by all specified parties as identified in the above AFS Conflict of Interest Policy Statement (approved by the AFS Governing Board on DATE).  Please complete the shaded blocks below, print and sign the form, and return it to AFS headquarters as indicated below.

 

I have no conflict of interest to report

 

I have the following conflict of interest to report (please specify-form box will expand as necessary):

 

 

 

 

 

 

By affixing my signature, I certify my understanding of the implications of this policy.

 

 

 

Signature

 

 

 

Full Name

 

 

 

Date

 

 

 

 

 

Completed form to be returned to AFS headquarters at:

 

AFS

Attn:  Denise Spencer

5410 Grosvenor Lane, Suite 110

Bethesda, MD 20814

 

Or Fax to: 301-897-8096

 

 

 

Document based on materials provided by the National Council of Nonprofit Associations

 

Governance Travel Committee

Purpose:

The need for this AFS Special Committee was realized during the 2007 mid-year meeting of the AFS Governing Board in Atlanta.  The purpose of the committee is to invest in the professional development of Governing Board members by providing funding to assist in travel to the mid-year meeting.  The Governing Board approved a $20,000 budget item in

2008 for this endeavor; in addition, the Governing Board stipulated that an applicant’s unit or employer must provide some level of matching funds.  A 50% match is not necessary; a modest amount of matching funds is acceptable.  It was recognized by the GB that travel for some individuals to the mid-year meeting is a problem.  Many agencies view this meeting as strictly AFS business and not necessarily of benefit to their organization.  Further, many smaller Sections also lack resources to support travel for their President to attend the Mid- year meeting.

 

Composition:

 

Chair and two members appointed by the AFS President in three-year rotating terms with one member replaced each year. The three members include the past president of a division, a large section, and a small section.

 

Duties:

 

The Governance Travel Committee is charged with development of a set of criteria, soliciting applications from Governing Board members, reviewing and evaluating applications, and providing a list of travel award recipients to the President and Executive Director.  The committee’s work should be completed annually by 14 January.

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

Selection Criteria

 

Governing Board members or duly designated proxies from Divisions (8 members) and Sections (22 members), including the President of the Student Subsection may apply for a grant.

 

Priority will be given to Units most in need as described in their submission for a travel grant.  Smaller Units with limited fiscal resources will have the highest priority with Divisions having the lowest priority.

 

If successful grant submissions exceed the budget, all requests will be pro-rated. Application Submission Process

A statement of need should be included with each grant submission indicating that full reimbursement cannot be provided by employer or unit.

 

Itemized budget should be submitted with the travel grant request, using best estimate of travel expenses.

 

A commitment for some travel support (minimum 10%) by individual, unit, or employer should be explicitly stated.

 

Timelines

 

Call for applications will be sent to Governing Board members by mid-November and request for travel grants need to be received by the Chair before January 1 via email. Individuals selected to receive travel grants will be notified by January 14.

 

Actual costs for reimbursements will be submitted to AFS Director no later than 30 days after the meeting including all necessary receipts as listed in the travel rules.

 

Rules for claiming reimbursement

1.   Unless otherwise stated meal, hotel, and mileage reimbursement rates will generally follow those outlined for federally-reimbursed (USA) travel policy.

 

2.   Itemized receipts (copies acceptable) shall be required for all expenses other than mileage and meals reimbursed under the federal per diem guidelines. Departure and return times must be listed on your expense voucher.

 

3.   Meal receipts will not be required for claims made under these rates. Rates for travel days (first and last day) are typically ¾ of the maximum rate for that location.

 

4.   Phone charges while on travel will be reimbursed and should be primarily for business purposes.  Recognizing that overnight travel for the benefit of business requires time away from family; reasonable charges to your residence will be allowed but should be limited.

 

5.   Expenses must be itemized and broken down by date, with stated purpose of travel.

 

6.   Unless permission is received ahead of time, all air travel shall be at the lowest possible rate that can be obtained on the carrier of choice.  Generally, this will mean

at coach/economy class rates.  Ticket change fees imposed by commercial carriers are an allowable expense if they are necessary.  Intention is for travel grants to be

awarded and people to be notified by mid-January so affordable airfare can be obtained.

 

7.   Mileage for use of personal vehicle will be paid at the prevailing federal rate. Starting location and ending destination must be listed for each day, along with total miles traveled.

 

8.   Miscellaneous expenses should be documented and accompanied by receipt and must be for business purposes to be eligible for reimbursement.

 

9.   For those traveling from a different country please use a web based currency exchange tool to calculate rates such as:  http://www.xe.com/ucc/.

 

10. AFS reserves the right to deny reimbursement for any expenses in excess of the limits established in this policy or for claims made without proper documentation.

 

Guidelines for Preparation of Reports to the Governing Board

 

Units provide reports to the Governing Board twice each year, during the Mid-Year Meeting which is generally held in March and at the AFS Annual Meeting which is generally held in August or September.  Most committees and units will not have completed their work before the Mid-Year Meeting and may not have action items to present.  However, it is very helpful for the Board to have progress reports from all units and plans for the balance of the year.  Each Division, Section, and Committee should submit a progress report to the Governing Board.

 

These reports comprise the briefing book, which will be sent electronically and will be available on our web site a few weeks before the meeting to allow participants to review the reports and come to the meeting prepared for discussion.  To meet this posting schedule, the Society office will need to have all reports several weeks before the meeting.  The specific deadlines for each meeting will be provided at least 2 months in advance.

 

Use the format below, which will aid in distinguishing motions with policy and/or financial implications from general activity reports and suggestions for consideration by AFS Staff, Executive Director, Officers, or other Governing Board members.  This format will also assist us in referencing the activities of all committees and units within the structure of the AFS Strategic Plan.  The Governing Board should be taking action on issues with policy and/or financial implications.  Issues of procedure or day-to-day operations of the Society are handled through other mechanisms.

 

Please limit each motion report to a maximum of 2 pages.  Each “motion” report should state clearly what the motion is (the policy or financial action to be taken by AFS), and provide the justification and background for the motion.  The specific statement of the motion must be succinct, and indicate clearly what policy or budget action AFS is being asked to undertake.  If it is a complicated issue, or one resulting from a lengthier report, please provide the background report as a separate appendix file.

 

Motion reports should address an important policy or budget decision that your unit wants the Society to approve.  Include as motions only items that require a vote by the Governing Board (e.g., items with financial implications, issues of policy for the Society).  Do not include as motions “recommendations” for consideration by the Management Committee, requests for additional information, or general encouragement to other units or individuals to participate in a particular activity.  These belong in the separate “activity” report noted in item #4 below.

 

For activity reports, or reports with suggestions or recommendations for further consideration (but no formal motions), please limit your report to no more than 5 pages.  If you feel additional information is needed, please provide a separate appendix file.

 

For a motion to be considered, it must be received by the due date (see section entitled Reports to the Governing Board) and a representative of the unit must be present to make the motion and answer questions about it.  This requirement is necessary to insure informed decision making by the Board.  If no one from your committee or unit will be present, please arrange an alternate in advance, and ensure your alternate is well-informed about the issue.

 

The final item of the semi-annual report to the Governing Board is a reminder to all unit officers to provide an annual summary financial report.  This will not be copied and distributed to the Governing Board, but will be reviewed and filed by the Society’s Director of Administration and

 

Finance.  This item is very important for our overall Society auditing and tax status. Please be sure to send in your financial report.

 

Format for Governing Board Reports

 

(please include all sections – note “nothing to report” if a section is intentionally blank)

 

 

 

TO:  AFS President

 

FROM:  Unit President or Committee Chair Name, Name of Unit

 

DATE:  date submitted

 

 

 

I. Motion Report –  (2 pages max)

 

 

(A) Recommended Motion: (State clearly and succinctly the specific action/decision you wish

AFS to make.)

 

(B) Minority View: (Describe briefly any dissenting views against the motion from within your unit.)

 

(C) Background for Motion: (Explain why the motion is needed-what problem is to be solved, or opportunity to be pursued.  Why is this important for AFS?)

 

 

 

II  Activity Report (5 pages max)

 

 

(A) Charge or Annual Program of Work:

 

 

 

(B) Summary of Outcomes and Accomplishments Organized by Focus Area in Strategic Plan with the appropriate Goal, Strategy, and Target (as possible) referenced from the AFS Strategic Plan, 2005-2009 (www.fisheries.org).  Please try to be as specific as possible but we understand it may be difficult to characterize your unit activities beyond the Focus Areas and Goals listed in the AFS Strategic Plan, but doing so will greatly facilitate Society efforts to monitor progress toward the Plan’s targets.  Focus Areas include:

 

Information Transfer and Outreach

 

Membership Services

 

Aquatic Stewardship

 

 

 

(C) Recommendations or Suggestions for Future Consideration:  Include briefly any suggestions you have for other individuals or units within AFS to respond to your unit’s activities, to provide additional information that your unit needs, to consider future activities that AFS might engage in, or challenge other units to take on certain initiatives.

 

 

 

III. Financial Status (provided only to Society Financial Officer and will not be copied and distributed in the briefing book)

 

This information is needed by the Director of Administration and Finance to confirm the Society’s non-profit status.  Please provide a copy of your Unit annual financial report for the past fiscal year.  This section will not be distributed, but will be reviewed and filed by the AFS Director of Administration and Finance.

 

Example Midyear Report to the Governing Board

 

 

 

To:  Ira Adelman, AFS President

 

From: Steve Rideout, President, Fisheries Management Section

 

Date: February 15, 2003

 

I. Motion Report:

 

(A) Recommended Motion: Move that the American Fisheries Society support the intent of the Sustainable Forestry Initiative, and suggest that the Initiative could be strengthened by a) electing an American Fisheries Society member to the SFI External Review Panel; b) seeking active AFS participation in on-the-ground certification reviews; and c) improving SFI riparian and road standards.

 

(B) Minority View: Not Applicable

 

(C) Background for Motion: See the attachment to this report, a memo from Section member Tom McMahon to Steve Rideout, Section President. We encourage the Governing Board to approve a motion to endorse the intent of the Sustainable Forestry Initiative and specifically seek to have an AFS member elected to the External Review Panel and develop a process, through the Fisheries Management Section and Divisions/Chapters, to participate in “on-the-ground” certification reviews, and propose improvements in SFI’s riparian and road standards. We suggest that AFS support may be shown appropriately by writing a letter to the AFS President (or appropriate officer or director) of the American Forest and Paper Association and/or other organizations overseeing the Sustainable Forestry Initiative.

 

II. Activity Report

 

(A) Charge or Annual Program of Work:  No specific charge or program of work defined.

 

(B) Summary of Outcomes and Accomplishments Organized by Focus Area in Strategic Plan with the appropriate goals, strategies, targets referenced.

 

Information Transfer and Outreach

 

Goal 3.1.  We have contributed to the 4th World Fisheries Congress (see additional info below).

 

Goal 3.1. We are introducing a Request for Funding process through our Section’s Web Site thanks to the efforts of Fred Janssen, with great input from President-Elect Dave Willis, Past President Tim Hess and Secretary-Treasurer Dirk Miller. This will provide a common

format and vehicle for receiving requests and prevent the sometimes last-minute crush that comes during our Annual Business Meeting.

 

Membership Services

 

Goal 2.2. Past President Tim Hess is taking the lead on developing a symposium entitled “Utilizing the New State Wildlife Grants and Landowner Incentive Program(s) to Improve Habitat for Fish and Other Aquatic Species in Decline.”

 

Goal 1.3. Section members voted to support the travel costs for an international member of the Section to attend the 4th World Fisheries Congress.  Section Past-President Tim Hess oversaw the successful application of FMS Section Member Robert Arlinghaus from Germany to be

sponsored at the 4th World Fisheries Congress this May by support of his travel. This was in

addition to the Section’s contribution of $2,500 to the WFC.

 

Aquatic Stewardship

 

Goal 1.1. The Section was asked to review the Sustainable Forestry Initiative of the American Forest and Paper Association (ASPA).  Section Member Tom McMahon (Montana Chapter) led the review and provided an analysis for AFS consideration (see attachment).  Aspects of his recommendations have been incorporated into a proposed Motion as provided in the beginning of this report.

 

Goals 1.4, 3.3, and ITO Goal 2.3. In March, our Section will once again be a sponsor of the International Salmonid Habitat Enhancement Workshop (15th this year).  Section Past-President Don Duff will be actively involved in the Workshop to be held in March in Salt Lake City following the Annual Meeting of the Western Division – AFS.

 

(C) Recommendations or Suggestions for Future Consideration: The Section challenges other AFS Units to contribute financial support to the World Fisheries Congress.

 

III. Financial Status (provided only to Society Financial Officer and will not be copied and distributed in the briefing book): To be provided to the AFS Director of Administration and Finance by the Unit Treasurer.

 

Procedures for Electronic Voting

 

A. Purpose

 

Provides for electronic voting on issues by the AFS membership and the Governing Board to allow broader participation by the membership and more-timely decision-making by the Governing Board.

 

B. Background

 

Although meetings rotate around the continent and meeting registration fees are kept as low as possible, the cost to attend the Society business meeting at the annual conference is high for a large segment of the membership.  This is a deterrent to regular participation at annual meetings by many AFS members. Typical attendance at a Society business meeting ranges from 300-500 members, which is less than 5 percent of the total membership.

 

Limited attendance can likewise affect the discussion and passage of items voted on at annual meetings, where the proportion of the membership in attendance is small and may be geographically biased.  Further, encouraging international growth and involvement in the Society requires adapting functions to accommodate such members’ participation at more levels.

 

For these reasons, decision-making on important issues such as constitutional or rule amendments, acceptance of resolutions or resource policy statements, election of officers, and other substantial issues may be conducted electronically to allow the largest

possible participation by the AFS membership.

 

While electronic voting by the entire AFS membership allows for greater participation in Society decisions, electronic voting by the Governing Board facilitates the Board’s ability to make important decisions more frequently than at semi-annual meetings and allows decisions on routine matters to be handled outside of the semi-annual meetings thus reducing time needed for those meetings.

 

Any issue that requires a vote of the AFS membership or the Governing Board may be conducted electronically. However, careful consideration should be given to electronic votes on issues that are anticipated to be controversial because in-person discussion may be needed to resolve controversies.

 

Except for referenda brought forward by petition of AFS members (AFS Constitution, Article VI.6.A), all proposals requiring a vote of the AFS membership must first be approved by the Governing Board. Therefore the electronic voting processes described below are separated into procedures for electronic voting by the AFS membership and procedures for electronic voting by the Governing Board.

 

C. Electronic voting processes

 

1. Electronic voting by the entire AFS Membership

a. Approval to submit an issue for electronic voting

 

When the Governing Board approves a motion that needs subsequent approval by the AFS membership, the AFS President (presiding officer) will seek a second motion to submit the previously passed motion to an electronic vote by the AFS membership. If the second motion carries, then the first motion will be presented

 

to the AFS membership for an electronic vote by the procedure described in Section C.1.b. (below). If the motion for an electronic vote fails, then the first motion must be presented to the membership at the subsequent Annual Business Meeting with notification as specified in the AFS Constitution.

 

b. Presentation for review and comment

 

The Vote Auditor oversees the electronic voting process, whether it is facilitated by AFS information technology staff or by external service providers.

 

Notice is provided to members via the AFS list serve with a copy of the Governing Board approved motion, proposal, or amendment posted to the AFS Forum, at a minimum, along with a time limit for initial comment following the process outlined for that type of issue (e.g., at least 30 days advance notice for constitutional amendments). The proposal and notice may also be provided in Fisheries, if warranted.

 

c. Amended proposals

 

At the close of the comment period, if dialogue is substantial, the Governing Board, at the direction of the AFS President, reconsiders the proposal, adopts appropriate amendments, and presents the amended motion as described in Section C.1.b. As long as, in the judgment of the Governing Board, new information is emerging from the discussions, the proposal will be restated with a new time limit for response.

 

d. Call the question for voting

 

When in the judgment of the AFS President further discussion on the issue is not meaningful, the proposal is put forward for electronic voting with a 30-day deadline set for casting a vote. The wording of the final motion and deadline for voting must be announced electronically to the membership and on the AFS website, at a minimum.

 

The vote will be conducted as one member, one vote with no proxy voting allowed. AFS headquarters will confirm active member status of each voter. Appropriate mechanisms must be used to assure voter confidentiality. Provision will be made for paper ballots to be mailed at the request of any member.

 

e. Requirements

 

For an electronic vote to be conclusive, the number of votes cast must meet the quorum and the percentage approval required for that type of issue (e.g., 50 active members required to conduct Society business and 2/3 majority for constitutional amendments).

 

f. Voting options

 

The electronic voting options are: Yes/No/Abstention/Reopen Discussion. The Reopen Discussion option is to be selected if the voter determines that the issue has not been vetted to their satisfaction and therefore wishes to reopen discussion.

 

g. Results of a Reopen Discussion

 

If the majority of votes are cast for a Reopen Discussion, the electronic vote is cancelled and the process reverts to the discussion stage or is referred to an in- person meeting at the discretion of the AFS President.

 

h. Conditions for a vote of approval

 

A motion is approved if the majority of the voters give a positive vote (“Yes”). For decisions where a larger majority is required by Society bylaws, that rule will prevail.

 

i. Declaration of the outcome

 

The Vote Auditor determines the outcome of an electronic vote and communicates the result to the AFS President.

 

The AFS President confirms the result and conveys the final motion and result to the Executive Director for recording in the relevant minutes of a subsequent meeting, such as the next mid-year Governing Board or Society Business Meeting. (The electronic vote would be conducted instead of voting at the meeting, not in addition to voting in person.)

 

The final motion or action shall be stated and results of all votes shall be published in the next available issue of Fisheries and on the AFS website.

 

2. Electronic Voting by the Governing Board

a. Approval to submit an issue for electronic voting

 

Proposals requiring a vote of the Governing Board generally arise from the semi- annual reports of units and committees that are presented in the briefing book prior to the mid-year and annual meetings of the Governing Board. Those proposals are typically resolved in those two meetings. However, the Management Committee has periodic conference calls throughout the year and proposals needing Governing Board approval occasionally arise during those calls. With management committee approval, the presiding officer (AFS president) will inform the Governing Board electronically of an upcoming vote.

 

b. Presentation for review and comment

 

The AFS President oversees the electronic voting process. Notice is provided to Governing Board members via email with a copy of the proposal posted to the AFS Forum along with a 2-week time limit for initial comment.

 

c. Amended proposals

 

At the close of the comment period, if dialogue is substantial, the Governing Board, at the direction of the AFS President, reconsiders the proposal, proposes appropriate amendments, and re-posts the item for continuing discussion for another 2 weeks. At the end of this second 2-week discussion period, if dialogue is still substantial and resolution does not seem close, the AFS President should seek a privileged motion to postpone the issue to the next mid-year or annual meeting. If the motion to postpone fails, then the question on the main motion should be called and the vote tallied.

 

d. Call the question for voting

 

When it is the judgment of the AFS President that further discussion on the issue is not meaningful, the question is called for electronic voting with a 2-week deadline set for casting a vote. The wording of the final motion and deadline for voting must be announced electronically to the Governing Board.

 

e. Requirements

 

For an electronic vote to be conclusive, the number of votes received must meet the quorum and percentage approval required for that type of issue (e.g., 50% of Governing Board members plus one casting a vote and 3/4 majority for constitutional amendments),

 

f. Voting options

 

The electronic voting options are: Yes/No/Abstention/Reopen Discussion. The Reopen Discussion option is to be selected if the voter determines that the issue has not been vetted to their satisfaction and therefore wishes to reopen discussion.

 

g. Results of a Reopen Discussion

 

If the majority of votes are cast for a Reopen Discussion, the electronic vote is cancelled and the process reverts to the discussion stage or is referred to an in- person meeting at the discretion of the AFS President.

 

h. Conditions for a vote of approval

 

A motion is approved if the majority of the voters give a positive vote (“Yes”). For decisions where a larger majority is required by the AFS Constitution, that rule will prevail.

 

i. Declaration of the outcome

 

The AFS President determines the outcome of an electronic vote (closure, reopening discussion or referral to an in-person meeting) and communicates the result to the Governing Board members. The Executive Director directs the recording of the outcome of the vote in the relevant minutes of a subsequent meeting, such as the next mid-year Governing Board meeting. If a subsequent AFS membership vote is required for the proposal to become effective, that vote may be obtained at the next AFS Annual Meeting or by electronic vote of the membership as per the procedures described above.

 

DIVISIONS

 

 

Divisions are the major geographically defined units of the Society (Figure 2, page 8).  Each North American member of AFS is automatically a member of one Division, as described in the AFS Bylaws.  Division boundaries follow existing political boundaries of states, provinces, or territories and are specifically defined in the AFS Rules.

 

Divisions represent an important level of participation for many AFS members because the Divisions carry out many of the activities of the Society, but are oriented more closely to the area within each Division’s boundary. Divisions often serve as training grounds for members interested in Society activities.  Several of the Society Committees, for example, have Division representation.

 

Purposes

 

The general purposes and responsibilities of Divisions are as follows:

 

1.   Facilitate communication among members (by newsletters and other means) regarding the conduct of the fisheries profession within the Division’s geographic region.

 

2.   Sponsor and perform a wide range of technical activities that advance the status and performance of the fisheries profession in the geographic region, including holding technical meetings and symposia, publishing technical reports and proceedings, conducting technical reviews, and performing Division-wide research and managerial studies.

 

3.   Determine the views of Division members in a variety of ways, including conducting surveys, considering resolutions, commissioning formal and informal studies, and producing position papers.

 

4.   Present the views of Division members to the AFS membership, the profession, the general public, and government decision-makers.

 

5.   Hold annual meetings at which all Bylaw responsibilities are carried out.

 

6.   Participate in the governing of the Society via voting membership on the Governing

Board and serving on other Society Committees.

 

7.   Promote the fisheries profession within the Division’s boundaries through active and positive relations with journalists, government officials, special interest groups, other professional organizations, and the general public.

 

8.   Promote proper use of aquatic resources by initiating and participating in special projects that increase public awareness, expand participation, improve habitat, and protect fragile resources.

 

Officers and Duties

 

Division officers are important to AFS because of their role in both Society and Division functions.  These positions are especially demanding of time and creativity.  Division officers must have intense interest in, and knowledge of, regional issues; at the same time, regional

 

interests must be balanced against national and international interests when Division officers act on behalf of the Society.

 

Each Division is required to have a minimum of a President, a President-Elect, and a Secretary/Treasurer or a Secretary and a Treasurer.  Each officer has specific duties assigned by the Division’s Bylaws.  In addition, Division officers have the following duties for the Society:

 

President:

 

1.   Serves as a voting member of the Society Governing Board, attending the three meetings per year, and performing all duties as described in the Governing Board Chapter of these procedures.

 

2.   Serves as a voting member of the Management Committee in year appointed by the

Society President.

 

3.   Serves as a voting member of the Certification Board of Appeals (if qualified as a

Certified Fisheries Professional).

 

4.   Prepares mid-year and annual reports of the Division’s activities for presentation at the mid-year and annual Governing Board meetings, including Chapter activities within the Division.

 

President-Elect:

 

1.   Serves as a voting member of the Society Governing Board, attending the three meetings per year, and performing all duties as described in the Governing Board Chapter of these procedures.

 

2.   Serves as a voting member of the Management Committee in year appointed by the

Society President.

 

Secretary:

 

1.   Sends minutes of annual meeting to the AFS Executive Director within 30 days after the annual Division meeting.

 

2.   Forwards historical records of the activities, minutes, individuals, and other aspects of the Division to AFS headquarters, as requested.

 

3.   Informs the Executive Director, the Chapter Presidents within the Division, and appropriate Society staff of changes in officers, dates and locations of meetings, and other necessary information.

 

4.   Distributes copies of resolutions to the Executive Director, Society officers, other units, and appropriate individuals or agencies, as instructed in the resolution.

 

5.   Forwards any proposed Bylaw changes to the Executive Director for review by the AFS Constitutional Consultant prior to presentation of changes to the Society’s Governing Board for approval.

 

6.   Orders a Past-President’s plaque (from AFS staff) to be presented at the annual

Division meeting.

 

7.   Prepares occasional write-ups for Fisheries concerning Division activities and programs.

 

Treasurer:

 

1.   Receives, holds, invests, and disburses funds as needed for Division function as approved by Society and Division Constitution, Bylaws, Rules, and Procedures.

 

2.   Maintains financial records in standard accounting format for review by Society officers and staff as needed or required.

 

Elected Representative to Society Nominating Committee

 

1.   Serves as a voting member of the Committee, and in this capacity represents the opinions of the Division.

 

Standing Committees

 

Most Divisions define several standing committees in their Bylaws, representing the functions which are essential to organizational life.  As a minimum, the following committees are recommended:

 

1.   Executive, which oversees all Division functions and authorizes all Division activities.

 

2.   Nominating, which recommends candidates for officers and which may collect and tally ballots.

 

3.   Membership, which recruits new members for the Division and the Society and ensures continued membership of current members.  Chair of this Committee automatically serves as a voting member of the Society Membership Committee.

 

4.   Resolutions, which develops and recommends resolutions for consideration by the Division membership.  Chair of this Committee automatically serves as a voting member of the Society Resolutions Committee.

 

SECTIONS

 

 

Sections are units of the Society defined by professional interests and are intended to advance the Society’s objectives within the various disciplines of fisheries science and practice.  Sections share the general purposes of the Society, but restrict their activities to their specified interest area.  A Section may also create smaller organizational units within it to serve its purposes, but these units shall not act without Section approval.  Sections have no geographic boundaries.

 

Sections are formed when a group of AFS members decides that sufficient interest exists in a particular fishery science discipline to enable a unit devoted to that topic to have long-term viability.  Sections can also be formed when personnel of a long-standing special committee take the appropriate steps.  Steps involved in Section formation and dissolution are described in the AFS Constitution printed in the AFS Membership Directory and Handbook.

 

Purposes

 

The general purposes and responsibilities of Sections are as follow:

 

1.   Facilitate communication among members (by newsletters and other means)

regarding new developments in the professional interest-area of the Section.

 

2.   Hold meetings, publish works, and perform other activities on a technical and semi- technical level that advance the status and performance of professionals with the specified interests.

 

3.   Determine the views of Section members relative to issues within the interest-area of the Section, for example, by conducting surveys, considering resolutions, and convening panels of experts.

 

4.   Present the views of Section members to the AFS membership, the profession, the public, and governmental decision-makers.

 

5.   Hold annual Section meetings at which all Bylaw responsibilities are carried out.

 

6.   Serve as technical advisors to AFS officers and staff and to government agencies on topics relating to the professional focus of the Section.

 

7.   Promote the fisheries profession and membership in AFS among interest-area professionals and through active and positive relations with journalists, government officials, special interest groups, other professional organizations, and the general public.

 

8.   Promote wise use of aquatic resources by initiating and participating in special projects that increase public awareness, expand participation, improve habitat, and protect fragile resources.

 

9.   Maintain Section membership at a level that permits comprehensive representation of the Section’s interest area (and ideally at a membership level over 50 to permit a vote on the Society’s Governing Board).

 

Officers and Duties

 

Each Section is required to have a minimum of a President, a President-Elect, and a Secretary/Treasurer or a Secretary and a Treasurer.  Each officer has specific duties assigned by the Section’s Bylaws.  In addition Section officers have the following duties for the Society:

 

President:

 

1.   Serves as a member of the Society’s Governing Board, attends the three meetings per

year, and performs all duties as described in Chapter 3.

 

2.   Serves as a voting member of the Management Committee if elected as a member at large by the Governing Board.

 

3.   Prepares mid-year and annual reports of the Section’s activities for presentation at the

mid-year and annual Executive Committee meetings.

 

President-Elect:

 

1.   Represents, as a proxy, the President if the current President is unable to attend a

Governing Board Meeting.

 

Secretary:

 

1.   Sends minutes of annual meeting to the AFS Executive Director within 30 days after the annual Section meeting.

 

2.   Forwards historical records of activities, minutes, individuals, and other aspects of the

Section to AFS headquarters, as requested.

 

3.   Informs the Executive Director and appropriate Society staff of changes in officers, dates and locations of meetings, and other necessary information.

 

4.   Distributes copies of resolutions to the Executive Director, Society officers, other units, and appropriate individuals or agencies, as instructed in the resolution.

 

5.   Forwards any proposed Bylaw changes to the Executive Director for review by the AFS Constitutional Consultant prior to presentation of changes to the Society’s Governing Board for approval.

 

6.   Orders a Past-President’s plaque (from AFS staff) to be presented at the annual

Section meeting.

 

7.   Prepares occasional write-ups for Fisheries concerning Section activities and programs.

 

Treasurer:

 

1.   Receives, holds, invests, and disburses funds as needed for Section function as approved by Society and Section Constitution, Bylaws, Rules, and Procedures.

 

2.   Maintains financial records in standard accounting format for review by Society officers and staff as needed or required.

 

Standing Committees

 

Most Sections define several standing committees in their Bylaws, representing the functions which are essential to organizational life.  As a minimum, the following committees are recommended:

 

1.   Executive, which oversees all Section functions and authorizes all Section activities.

 

2.   Nominating, which recommends candidates for officers and which may collect and tally ballots.

 

3.   Membership, which recruits new members for the Section and the Society and ensures continued membership of current members.  Must be aggressive because of the need to recruit and then retain the 50 members required for a voting membership on AFS Governing Board.

 

4.   Resolutions, which develops and recommends resolutions for consideration by the

Section membership.

 

CHAPTERS AND OTHER UNITS

 

 

Chapters are the smallest geographically defined units recognized as being operationally independent in the Constitution.  They share the purposes of the Society but are intended to advance the Society’s objectives over more localized areas than Divisions, this area being specified in their Bylaws.

 

Chapters generally provide for interaction among professionals within limited areas, such as individual states or provinces (e.g., Ohio Chapter), contiguous states or provinces (e.g., the California-Nevada Chapter), or areas united by common interest (e.g., the Potomac or Tidewater Chapters).  Chapters are technically units of Divisions; however, Chapters may form in areas not covered by existing Divisions.  Chapter boundaries may not cross Division lines, but otherwise they need not follow political boundaries.

 

Chapters may create smaller organizational units with various titles, organization, and purposes. These subsidiary units may not act without the unit’s approval.  Under the Constitution, this is the mechanism for creating groups covering even smaller geographic areas (e.g., the Palouse Unit of the Idaho Chapter and Student Subunits within state Chapters).

 

Chapters and any other smaller organizational units are formed when a group of members decides that sufficient interest exists to support a viable long-term organization.  Steps involved in Chapter formation and dissolution are described in the AFS Constitution, printed in the AFS Membership Directory and Handbook, available on the AFS web site (www.fisheries.org) or from the Constitutional Consultant.

 

Members interested in forming new Chapters or units should recognize that such groups often appear viable because of the interest of a few motivated individuals.  When these individuals relocate or become involved in other activities, a Chapter may become inactive.  The difficulty

of maintaining a viable Chapter or smaller organizational unit increases as the geographic area or topic breadth decreases.  Student Subunits, for example, may be particularly prone to instability because of the transitory nature of the membership.  Student Subunits may only be formed under the umbrella of an active Chapter.

 

Chapters and other subsidiary units may recognize affiliate members (individuals who are not members of the Society), but affiliates should be strongly encouraged to join the Society.  All officers of any unit, committee chairs, and individuals voting on unit affairs, however, must be Society members, except as indicated in the case of jointly affiliated Student Subunits.

 

Joint Student Subunits

The AFS Constitution accommodates society subunits that have joint affiliation with the AFS and at least one other professional society, such as The Wildlife Society (TWS). These subunits are typically desired at institutions where:

1)  The small number of students in a program is inadequate to support two separate units; or

2)  Students in undergraduate or interdisciplinary programs are not segregated into separate disciplines of wildlife and fisheries.

 

To avoid unnecessary duplication of officer functions, a single set of officers could provide leadership to a mixed group of student subunit members belonging to multiple professional societies, including AFS, provided that:

 

1)  The bylaws and function of the joint organization comply with all AFS requirements (e.g., the secretary sends meeting notes to the AFS Executive Director; the treasurer makes financial records available upon request);

2)  Either the President or Vice President is an AFS member (alternating, if a President- Elect automatically becomes President);

3)  The faculty advisor is a member of both societies or there are co-advisors with at least one being an AFS member;

4)  There are at least six AFS members who can serve as officers or chairs of any committees that specifically address AFS functions; and

5)  The AFS Governing Board recognizes that upon dissolution of the subunit, assets will be distributed at the discretion of the joint unit.

 

Purposes

 

The general purposes and responsibilities of Chapters are as follows:

 

1.   Facilitate communication among members (by newsletters and other means) regarding fisheries science issues and the conduct of the fisheries profession within the Chapter’s region.

 

2.   Hold meetings, publish works, and perform other activities on a technical and semi-technical level that advance the status and performance of the fisheries profession within the Chapter’s region.

 

3.   Determine the views of members relative to professional topics affecting their performance, for example, by conducting surveys and considering resolutions.

 

4.   Present the views of Chapter members to the Division membership, the AFS membership, and to the general public and government agencies within the Chapter’s boundaries.

 

5.   Hold annual meetings at which all Bylaw responsibilities are carried out.

 

6.   Serve as technical and professional advisors to government agencies within the

Chapter’s region.

 

7.   Promote the fisheries profession within the Chapter’s boundaries through active and positive relations with journalists, government officials, special interest groups, other professional organizations, and the general public.

 

8.   Promote proper use of aquatic resources by initiating and participating in special projects that increase public awareness, expand participation, improve habitat, and protect fragile resources.

 

Officers and Duties

 

Each Chapter is required to have at least a President, a President-Elect, and a Secretary/Treasurer

or a Secretary and a Treasurer.  Each officer has specific duties assigned by the Chapter’s

Bylaws. In addition, Chapter officers have the following duties for the Society:

 

President:

 

1.   Extends an invitation to the Division President to attend the annual Chapter meeting

(and any other general activities of the Chapter).

 

2.   Serves as a voting member of the Division’s Executive Committee and attends all

meetings of that Committee.

 

3.   Prepares mid-year and annual reports of the Chapter’s activities for presentation at the annual Division meeting and attends if possible.

 

4.   Serves as a nonvoting member of the Society Governing Board and attends meetings, if possible.

 

President-Elect:

 

1.   Represents, as a proxy, the President if the current President is unable to attend a

Division Executive Committee Meeting.

 

Secretary:

 

1.   Sends minutes of annual meeting to the AFS Executive Director within 30 days after the annual Chapter meeting.  Minutes and newsletters should also be sent to the Division President.

 

2.   Forwards historical records of the activities, minutes, individuals, and other aspects of the Chapter to AFS headquarters, as requested.

 

3.   Informs the Executive Director, the Division President, and appropriate Society staff of changes in officers, dates and locations of meetings, and other necessary information.

 

4.   Distributes copies of resolutions to the Executive Director, Society officers, the Division President, and appropriate individuals or agencies, as instructed in the resolution.

 

5.   Forwards any proposed Bylaw changes to the Executive Director for review by the AFS Constitutional Consultant prior to presentation of changes to the Society’s Governing Board for approval.

 

6.   Orders a Past-President’s certificate (from AFS staff) to be presented at the annual

Chapter meeting.

 

7.   Prepares occasional write-ups for Fisheries concerning Chapter activities and programs

 

Treasurer:

 

1.   Receives, holds, invests, and disburses funds as needed for Chapter function as approved by Society and Chapter Constitution, Bylaws, Rules, and Procedures.

 

2.   Maintains financial records in standard accounting format for review by Society officers and staff as needed or required.

 

Standing Committees

 

Most Chapters include a variety of standing committees in their Bylaws, representing the functions which are essential to organizational life.  As a minimum, the following committees are recommended:

 

1.   Executive, which oversees all Chapter functions and authorizes all Chapter activities.

 

2.   Nominating, which recommends candidates for officers and which may collect and tally ballots.

 

3.   Membership, which recruits new members for the Chapter and the Society and ensures continued membership of current members.

 

4.   Resolutions, which develops and recommends resolutions for consideration by the

Chapter membership.

 

STANDING AND SPECIAL COMMITTEES

 

 

Standing Committees are permanent committees established through the Society Constitution. These committees perform a variety of tasks deemed essential by the membership.  Committees carry the burden of substantive work conducted for the membership as a whole.

 

Additional Standing Committees are established through amendments to the Constitution, usually by converting a special committee that has functioned effectively for several years and the charge of which has been deemed worthy of standing-committee status.

 

The AFS President appoints and charges the chairs and members of all standing committees within 30 days after the annual Society meeting unless otherwise specified.  All appointees must be Active Members, and their terms of duty extend to the end of the next annual meeting if not stipulated otherwise.

 

Special Committees address topics that do not fall under the responsibilities of Standing Committees.  In the past, the terms “ad hoc” and “sessional”, as well as “special”, have been used by the Society to denote this type of organizational unit.  The term “Special Committee” is

now designated in the Constitution as the standard name for any group acting for the Society that is not specifically authorized in the Constitution.

 

Special Committees are formed when the AFS President or Governing Board decides that a formalized AFS action or position is needed on some issue.  Examples include internal studies of the Society or specific Society functions (e.g., long-range planning), developing issues of

national or international importance (e.g., reorganization of federal fisheries agencies), or new initiatives by the Society (e.g., fish photograph library).

 

Special Committees are established by the AFS President, with no additional authorization needed.  They exist for one year, but may be re-appointed in subsequent years at the discretion of the subsequent AFS President.  Members may include individuals who are not Active Members of the Society, particularly for Special Committees established in partnership with other professional/scientific societies or for issues on which current AFS expertise is limited.

 

Society Committees and their current chairpersons are listed in the annual AFS Membership

Directory and Handbook and on the AFS Web site.

 

The Coordinator of Unit Services on AFS staff provides support for committees and track membership on the committees.

 

Responsibilities of Committee Chairs

 

In addition to the specific responsibilities for each committee, committee chairs share a number of general responsibilities, as follows:

 

1.  Ensure that the committee charge is well understood and implemented:

 

  • Confer with the AFS President after being appointed to determine the exact charge of the committee and any unusual or specific charges for that year.  Work must begin quickly because committees generally have one year or less to perform their charges.

 

  • Confer with the outgoing chair of the committee to determine what tasks remain from the preceding year and to receive documents, supplies, and other materials necessary for committee function.

 

  • Review the Society Constitution, Rules and Procedures with special emphasis on the sections relevant to your committee.

 

2.  Committee Appointments:

 

  • Official appointments are made by the AFS President.  The Chair should work with the AFS President to develop a list of potential committee members. Potential members should be contacted to determine their ability and willingness to join the committee.  It is the responsibility of the Chair to make expectations and work load requirements clear to potential committee members.

 

  • Broad representation in committee membership is important so that the committee accurately reflects the Society’s overall viewpoint.  Geographic location, professional expertise, and employment sector are primary criteria for committee balancing.

 

  • There is benefit to maintaining institutional memory and to a fresh perspective on committee responsibilities.  The Chair should balance those by recommending a mix of new and returning members.

 

  • Some committees have very specific limitations on membership and terms of service (e.g., Certification).  It is the Chair’s responsibility to ensure that the AFS President is aware of them and makes appointments accordingly.

 

3.  Committee Leadership:

 

  • Immediately after appointment of the committee, contact all members to describe the nature of the committee’s work, the specific tasks to be completed and the associated timetables, and to solicit suggestions from members concerning the most efficient and effective way to perform those tasks.

 

  • Work with committee members to develop goals, time schedules, and responsibilities.  Be respectful of the fact that this is volunteer work and allow sufficient time to complete the tasks.
  • Maintain regular contact with committee members.  Members rely on the Chair to keep them on schedule, which means that one of the Chair’s main jobs is to keep the members working.

 

 

  • When appropriate, encourage members to confer with colleagues, both within and outside AFS, who may be interested in the committee’s charge or have experience with similar issues or activities.  Exceptions would be in cases where the committee has agreed to keep interim drafts confidential until a final draft is completed or for confidential issues (e.g., Ballot Tally, Certification, Ethics and Professional Conduct, etc.).

 

4.  Travel expenses:

 

  • Committee chairs (and the AFS President) should make it clear when recruiting committee members that travel expenses are not normally covered for AFS committee activities. If for whatever exceptional reason a committee chair decides that he/she must have the participation of a committee member at a certain committee meeting, and such participation requires travel funding, the committee chair should submit this request to the AFS President and Executive Director in writing, specifying the estimated amount and justifying the need.  If approved in writing by the Executive Director and Officers, on a case by case basis, the recipient will be notified by the committee chair.

 

5.  Committee decisions and minority opinions:

 

  • On questions requiring votes, the Chair should vote only to break ties or vote with a sealed ballot before the rest of the committee so the Chair’s vote cannot unduly alter the outcome.

 

  • In all deliberations, encourage members to express their opinions before expressing the Chair’s.  Participate in the process only as much as any other member.

 

  • Prohibit any individual member from dominating the committee’s viewpoint by actively seeking the opinions of all members (e.g., circulating drafts of one member’s long letter, asking each member to speak on each issue or asking specific questions of each member during conference calls).

 

  • Provide opportunities for committee members to include minority opinions or reports along with the main actions or recommendations of the committee.

 

6.  Reports and Record Keeping:

 

  • Submit midyear and annual reports to the AFS President, on time and in the prescribed format.

 

  • Maintain complete and orderly files of committee correspondence and action for transmission to the incoming chair where appropriate.  This should include

memos to the file describing any new procedures or modifications used during the year.

 

7.  Institutional Memory and Continuity:

 

  • Review the Society Constitution, Rules and Procedures near the end of your term as Chair.  Do those documents accurately describe Committee roles and operations?  Recommend to the AFS President any changes necessary for the efficient operation of the Committee and Society.  Make the recommendation in the form of a motion to update the appropriate document(s) so that the Governing Board will consider it at their next meeting.

 

  • At the end of your term write letters to active committee members, thanking them for their participation.

 

  • Recommend prospective committee members and chairs for the following year to the President-Elect.

 

Responsibilities of Committee Members

 

In addition to the specific responsibilities for each committee, committee members share a number of general responsibilities, as follows:

 

1.  Ensure that the committee charge is well understood and implemented:

 

  • Confer with the Chair after being appointed to determine the exact charge of the committee.  It is important that you understand your role and the expectations of the Chair.  Don’t agree to serve unless you are willing and able to complete the assignments.

 

  • Review the Society Constitution, Rules and Procedures with special emphasis on the sections relevant to your committee.

 

2.  Committee Participation:

 

  • Respond in a timely manner to all requests from the Chair.  Provide suggestions on specific committee assignments as well as the most efficient and effective way to perform those tasks.  Participate in the development of goals, time schedules, and responsibilities.

 

  • When appropriate, confer with colleagues, both within and outside AFS, who may be interested in the committee’s charge or have experience with similar issues or activities.  Exceptions would be in cases where the committee has agreed to keep interim drafts confidential until a final draft is completed or for confidential issues (e.g., Ballot Tally, Certification, Ethics and Professional Conduct, etc.).

 

  • Express your opinions openly, considering the interests of the Society and entire membership before your personal interests.

 

  • Listen to, and carefully consider, the viewpoints of other committee members.

Do not dominate committee information exchanges whether personal, telephone, electronic or written.

 

  • Review the Society Constitution, Rules and Procedures near the end of each year.

Do those documents accurately describe Committee roles and operations? Recommend to the chair any changes necessary for the efficient operation of the Committee and Society.

 

3.  Travel expenses:

 

  • Be aware that travel expenses are not normally covered for AFS committee activities. If for whatever exceptional reason a committee member and chair believe that travel funding should be provided, the committee chair should submit this request to the AFS President and Executive Director in writing, specifying the estimated amount and justifying the need.  If approved in writing by the Executive Director and Officers, on a case by case basis, the recipient will be notified by the committee chair.

 

Purposes, Composition, and Duties of Standing Committees

 

For each of the Standing Committees the following sections will be included.  The intent is to provide a complete, clear and concise documentation of why the Committee exists, who should be on the Committee, what the Committee does and, when available, how they should do it.  The idea is to enhance efficiency and consistency by providing clear guidance to future Committees.

 

Purpose:

 

This will include the committee description directly from the Constitution. If the Constitution is changed this section should be changed similarly.  It is acceptable to add additional detail regarding purpose so long as it is consistent with the Constitution.  Care should be taken not to mix duties or operational details into this section.

 

Composition:

 

Some Standing Committees have very specific requirements for membership such as the Board of Professional Certification or Board of Appeals.  Most are less specific.  In all cases care should be taken to obtain broad representation in committee membership.  This is important so that, to the extent possible, committee perspectives reflect that of the Society.  Geographic location, professional expertise, and employment sector are primary criteria for committee balancing.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

This should be a list of the specific duties for each committee.  Please list chronologically if applicable.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

These are not relevant to every committee but some have rather specific rules for operation.  These are distinguished from duties in that duties are “what you do” and operational guidelines are “how you do it”.  This distinction is not always clear but can be helpful at times.

 

 

 

Arrangements Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Makes the arrangements for all aspects of the annual Society meeting.  This includes coordinating budget and finance, collaborating with the AFS central office on registration and other administrative aspects of the meeting, collecting fees, planning

accommodations and social functions, organizing venues for oral and poster presentations, fundraising, coordinating student affairs, and generating publicity for the meeting.

 

Composition:

 

The chair is selected at least two years prior to the meeting.  A suitable candidate is ideally identified at the time the group bidding for the annual meeting makes their presentation to the AFS Time and Place Committee for consideration.  This appointment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Duties:


is made by the current AFS President, but in consultation with the Officer who will preside over the meeting being arranged.  For example, the 2nd Vice President will be AFS President in 3 years so he or she selects the person to Chair arrangements at “their” meeting.  The Chair is generally a member of the local chapter or organization hosting the Annual meeting.  This person then serves as a member of the Committee until the

year they serve as Chair.

 

The Chair coordinates and administers all aspects of the Annual Meeting.   The Committee normally has many subcommittees composed of the host jurisdiction’s professionals.

 

 

 

The Chair also serves as General Chair for the Annual Meeting (Article IX, 2. A).  In this capacity the Chair provides coordination and oversight for the other meeting committees. If disagreements arise the Chair will make the final decision in consultation with the AFS President.

 

Performs activities as described in the “Guidelines for Hosts of Annual Meetings” which

is available from AFS Headquarters.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

None specified at this time

 

 

 

Audit Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Conducts a review of the Society finances to address Congressional concerns regarding nonprofit organizations where the Executive Director is also the financial officer. Provides recommendations to the Executive Director and AFS President concerning Society financial affairs.   (Article IX.1.B.)

 

Composition:

 

At least three AFS members including two Co-Chairs.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

  • Review the financial picture and practices of the Society at the end of each year before an outside contracted firm conducts the formal audit.

 

  • Work with Society financial staff to provide feedback to the Executive Director on financial issues.

 

  • Review the audit report provided by the contracted audit firm prior to the Midyear

Governing Board meeting.

 

  • Present conclusions in a report to the Governing Board at the AFS Annual Meeting.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

None.  Additional guidelines are described in the Procedures Manual section on

“Program Planning and Financial Planning.”

 

Awards Committee

 

Purpose:

 

The Awards Committee oversees subcommittees for various Society-level awards.  Each subcommittee has specific composition and duty requirements and, in most cases, selects award recipients.

 

Composition:

 

The Awards Committee includes subcommittees for each Society-level award.  The overall Chair is the First Vice-President, and the Unit Services Coordinator serves as the Staff contact person.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

The Chair coordinates the activities of all award subcommittees, ensuring that committee appointments are made and that each committee is active and on track to complete its assignment.  Soon after the April 1 nomination deadline, the Chair should solicit names

of nominees being considered by each award subcommittee to determine if any individual or entity has been nominated for more than one award.  If so, the Chair should alert the affected committees and ask them to coordinate their activities so that the same

individual or entity will not be recognized in the same year with multiple Society awards, unless such multiple awards are deemed appropriate.

 

Duties that are common to all subcommittees are listed here.  Other duties, specific to each award, will follow under that subcommittee’s listing in the Society Awards section of the Procedures.

1.   By October of each year, the Chair of each award subcommittee sends his or her contact information to both the Unit Services Coordinator and the Chair of the Awards Committee.

2.   Nominations are due April 1 and are sought in multiple ways:

a.   Each award subcommittee solicits nominees for its respective award.

b.   The Chair of the Awards Committee encourages Units to forward their award winner nominations to the appropriate Society award committee for consideration at this higher level.

c.   The Unit Services Coordinator solicits nominations for all Society awards in the December/January issue of Fisheries; those award notices must be sent to the editor of Fisheries in October. The Unit Services Coordinator also sends at least one reminder notice prior to the April 1 nomination deadline.

3.   The Chair of each award subcommittee informs the Chair of the Awards Committee of progress in recruiting members, award nominations, and any proposed procedural changes.

4.   After the selection of an award recipient, the Chair of each award subcommittee informs the Chair of the Awards Committee, Unit Services Coordinator, Executive Director, President, and awardee (informally). Every effort will be made to notify the awardee as far in advance of the meeting as possible to facilitate travel planning. The Unit Services Coordinator will send a formal letter from the President to notify the awardee, provide logistical information about the

 

meeting, and request necessary information (e.g., photograph and phonetic spelling of name). Awardees are encouraged to share the award announcement with colleagues. Press releases, however, should not be issued until after the annual meeting.

5.   Official announcement of each award occurs at the annual meeting, either at the Plenary Session or at the Business Meeting depending on the award and discretion of the President.

6.   To facilitate presenting the award at the annual meeting, the Chair of each award subcommittee will provide the Unit Service Coordinator with 3-4 one-line bullets summarizing the awardee(s) accomplishments as well as contact information.

 

Operational Guidelines: None specified at this time

 

 

 

Board of Appeals

 

Purpose:

 

Considers appeals from fisheries professionals whose applications for original or renewed certification have been denied by the Board of Professional Certification.  Only Certified Fisheries Professionals may serve on the board.

 

Composition:

 

Society Second Vice-President and each Division President; Chair of Board Professional

Certification (nonvoting convener).

 

All members must be Certified Fisheries Professionals.  Non-certified individuals serving in the roles identified above must designate a proxy from their unit, to be appointed by

the AFS President.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

1. Convener receives appeal request forwarded from the Executive Director.

 

2.  Convener writes analysis of original decision of the Board of Certification and of the new or expanded materials presented by applicant to counter that original decision and sends copies of this and the original application with all related materials along with a ballot to each Board of Appeals member.

 

3.  After reviewing the application, all attachments, and the analysis, each Board member sends only the marked ballot to the Executive Director who transmits the resulting decision (a simple majority vote of the five members overturns the original ruling) to applicant.

 

4.  This is a confidential process; Board members may not show or discuss applications or reveal the reasons for negative decisions to anyone except other Board members, Board of Appeals members, AFS Staff involved with certification, and the applicant.

 

5.  Certification Board Chair (as Convener) passes on new or ongoing appeals to the incoming Chair.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

The BOARD OF APPEALS considers appeals from fisheries professionals whose application for certification or renewal has been denied by the Board of Professional Certification. The board will consult with the appropriate subcommittees of the Board of Professional Certification as needed.  However, if an appeal is based on a denial because of a deficiency in Professional Development Quality Points, and if the application was rejected by the office staff member without examination by the Professional

Development Subcommittee, then the Board of Appeals must seek a recommendation from that subcommittee before taking action.

 

 

 

Board of Professional Certification

 

Purpose:

 

Certifies fisheries professionals based on standards and requirements adopted by the

Governing Board. Composition:

The Board of Professional Certification comprises three subcommittees: the Education Subcommittee, the Experience Subcommittee, and the Professional Development Subcommittee.  Each subcommittee will consist of five Certified Fisheries Professionals serving staggered three-year terms, one of whom shall be appointed chair.

 

One of the subcommittee chairs will be appointed Chair of the Board of Professional

Certification. The Chair is responsible for coordination of Board activities.

 

The Education Subcommittee must have at least one member from each Division, and all members must be faculty members from colleges and universities at the time of appointment.

 

The Experience Subcommittee must have at least one member from each Division, and have at least two employees of government agencies at the time of their appointment and one from the private sector at the time of his or her appointment.

 

The Professional Development Subcommittee must have at least one member from each Division, and have at least one faculty member from a college or university, one employee from a government agency, and one from the private sector.  Members must be from those groups at the time of their appointment.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

This committee approves or rejects applications for professional certification.  It is their obligation to be fair and objective and to maintain the integrity of the process.  They should also strive to complete reviews in a timely manner.

 

Each member must become familiar with and knowledgeable about the certification guidelines as published in these procedures and on the website at http://fisheries.org/docs/cert_pcp.pdf.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

The Education Subcommittee approves or denies applications with regard to educational requirements.

 

The Experience Subcommittee approves or denies applications with regard to professional experience requirements.

 

The Professional Development Subcommittee will work with the Coordinator of Unit Services to review Professional Development requests (both for certification and renewal).

 

Applications for Certified Fisheries Professional must be approved by all three subcommittees.

 

Applications for Associate Fisheries Professional must be approved only by the

Education Subcommittee.

 

Applications to upgrade from Associate Fisheries Professional to Certified Fisheries Professional must be approved by the Experience Subcommittee and the Professional Development Subcommittee provided the Associate Fisheries Professional status has not expired.

 

Applications for Emeriti status must be approved only by the Coordinator of Unit Services.  The Experience Subcommittee should evaluate applications if there are uncertainties or disagreements with applicants.

 

Applications for Certified Fisheries Professional under the “established fishery professional” category must be approved by the Experience Subcommittee and the Professional Development Subcommittee.

 

The Board may choose to table applications which are incomplete or require additional clarification.  Applicants will be given 90 days to provide additional information in support of their applications as requested by the Board.  The application will be denied if such information is not provided.

 

The Board responds to inquiries from the Board of Appeals as appropriate.

 

The Coordinator of Unit Services is responsible for overall coordination and distribution of applications to the subcommittees.  This includes answering questions and assisting members in the preparation of their application.  This also includes initial screening of applications to verify that all information provided by the applicant meets minimum certification requirements.  Applications should be rejected which clearly do not meet requirements.  The appropriate committees should evaluate applications if there are uncertainties or disagreements with applicants.

 

This is a confidential process; Board members may not show or discuss applications or reveal the reasons for negative decisions to anyone except other Board members, Board of Appeals members, AFS Staff involved with certification, and the applicant.

 

Each round of certification reviews consists of 2 votes.  The first round is referred to as pre-decision comments.  This is where subcommittee members do the most intensive review of the applications. Each subcommittee chair compiles all comments and distributes the results.  In cases of a split vote all members should review the application again and submit their final decision.  If decisions are unanimous on the first round there is no need for a second evaluation.  Three negative or 3 positive votes are required for a final decision on each subcommittee.  It is the chair’s responsibility to make a final decision if there is an even split (2 to 2).

 

The emeriti reviews require no pre-decision comment.  Individuals who held the CFP

designation for at least twenty (20) years (need not be consecutive) and who are

employed less than full time or are retired, may request emeriti status through which they can maintain their CFP status without the renewal requirement.

 

 

 

Constitutional Consultant

 

Purpose:

 

Assists and advises the AFS President on parliamentary procedure at all meetings of the Society, Governing Board, and Management Committee.  The Constitutional Consultant reviews all proposed amendments to the Constitution and assists the Executive Director with their presentation to the members prior to a vote.  The Constitutional Consultant reviews all proposed amendments to unit bylaws and bylaws of new units for conformity with the Society’s Constitution, and presents them to the Governing Board with recommendations for approval.

 

Composition:

 

One person.  It is best to appoint someone who is familiar with Governing Board operations and willing to serve for at least 3 years. The Constitutional Consultant serves for one year as an Apprentice before being the lead parliamentarian for a minimum term of two years.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

Most duties are described above in the purpose.  The most important task is to assist and advise the AFS President and other members of the Society on parliamentary issues.  It is also the responsibility of the Constitutional Consultant to ensure that the Society Procedures are updated to reflect Governing Board actions.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

The Constitutional Consultant serves as a non-voting member of the Governing Board and Management Committee.

 

The length of service is not specified but generally should be at least 3 years.  There should be a one year apprenticeship for the incoming Constitutional Consultant.  This allows the person to become familiar with issues and learn about the job.  The Constitutional Consultant is expected to be a member of the National Association of Parliamentarians.

 

 

 

Continuing Education Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Assesses the continuing educational and training needs of the fisheries profession and works in close coordination with the Society’s Chapters, Sections, and Divisions to develop a comprehensive continuing education program.

 

Composition:

 

Chair plus any number of others, as deemed appropriate by the Chair.  Recommended membership includes a representative from each of the AFS Divisions as well as representatives from other societies, as appropriate.  The inclusion of a Co-Chair is encouraged to maintain institutional knowledge and to distribute the work load.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

Committee sets criteria and guidelines to ensure appropriate quality control of all continuing education activities sponsored by AFS.  All continuing education activities sponsored at Society-level events must be approved by the Committee.  AFS Units may request assistance from the Committee for activities conducted at other venues, which

will provide guidance as appropriate.  Requests for Continuing Education Unit credits for courses are handled by this Committee.  Committee develops a slate of courses for the annual meeting.  Develops implementing direction and agenda for items related to its charge within the AFS Strategic Plan. Committee helps facilitate communication among AFS units with interests and experience in offering continuing education courses. (See “OPERATIONAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES”, section titled “PROCEDURE

FOR SUBMITTING PROPOSED CONTINUING EDUCATION COURSES”)

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

Most activities conducted by the Committee are done electronically, mainly through email correspondence; occasionally through conference calls if necessary and/or to increase the level of coordination and consistency of the Committee.  Rarely is a person- to-person meeting necessary for the Committee to conduct its business. In addition, when needed, the Committee can vote on application deadline extensions and other relevant procedural exceptions to ensure that an appropriate suite of quality continuing education courses are available to our membership for the year.  All changes will be proposed by

the Chair, and voted on by the Committee.  Approval for outstanding requests will be granted if approved by consensus.  If a course is deemed ineligible for continuing education credits, the Committee will decide whether or not an alternative venue is available for the course (such as proposing a “general workshop” at an AFS annual meeting).

 

National Education Opportunity Procedures

 

When applicable, the Continuing Education Committee (CEC) can consider partnerships with extrinsic organizations, such as educational organizations, Universities and University Education Programs, State, Local and Federal Fisheries Education Initiatives. When such an opportunity presents itself, it is then the duty of the Chair(s) to present a summary of the request and/or information and opportunity to the CEC committee for review & approval.  If/when the CEC agrees by overwhelming majority to move forward on the consideration of such an opportunity, the Chair(s) will then contact AFS Leadership to present the opportunity, including a concise summary of the opportunities potential benefits to the organization and AFS membership, to develop a plan to move forward on consideration of the partnership with the National AFS Organization (usually through a vote by the Governing Board).  Such opportunities for extrinsic partnerships will be handled on a case-by-case basis and will always require: 1) AFS CEC Committee

 

review and approval; and 2) AFS Leadership and Governing Board review and approval, before any formal agreements and sponsorships can be handled.  In addition, once approved, it will be the responsibility of the Chair(s) to draft an agreeable MOU with the partnering organization, which will then also need to be review and approved by AFS leadership, before any formal/final agreements and signatures can be rendered.

 

 

 

Electronic Services Advisory Board

 

Purpose:

 

Periodically evaluate AFS electronic membership services to assess effective and efficient functionality, information content, ease of use, timeliness of information, attractiveness, and implementation of new media.  Additionally, the Electronic Services Advisory Board (ESAB) will provide for broad-scale representation of member interests in electronic services by facilitating quality control of online data management, media and communications and facilitate technical guidance (e.g., annual workshops on electronic services) for units, sections, chapters and individuals.

 

Composition:

 

Includes the AFS President-elect, eight other persons with staggered two-year terms and appointed AFS staff.   Each AFS President shall appoint one member each from the Publications Overview Committee, the Meetings Oversight Committee, the Education Section and the Computer Users Section.  In addition, each AFS Division President shall appoint a single representative.  Two division and one section representative shall serve staggered terms. Each AFS President shall designate a Chair from within this committee other than the AFS President-Elect.   All members of this Advisory Board are voting members with the exception of the AFS staff.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

1. Provide guidance and strategic direction for the development, use, and maintenance of the AFS member-centric database.

 

2. Provide guidance and strategic support for development of an integrated member- centric website as part of the AFS web page.

 

3.  Continually monitor the AFS Web Site to assess its attractiveness, information content, ease of use, appropriateness of linkages, and timeliness of information.  Develop policies and recommendations to provide AFS staff with guidance on the AFS Web Site and other electronic services regarding:

 

a.  Content;

 

b.  Technical issues (e.g., quality control of information technology policies and procedures);

 

c.  Ethical and professional standards (e.g., advertising, accessibility, and copyright issues);

 

d.  Outsourcing (e.g., using ISPs versus self-hosting, using contractors);

 

e.  Promotion (e.g., increasing use by membership and general public, increasing search engine hits); and,

 

f.  Education (e.g., providing technical guidance on websites, listservs, online voting and other electronic services to divisions, sections, chapters and other units).

 

4.  If the Board deems that immediate substantial changes are needed, these should be transmitted directly to the AFS President.  If the Board deems that minor corrections to the web pages are needed, these should be transmitted directly to the Executive Director and appropriate AFS staff for their attention.

 

5. Review and advise AFS President and Executive Director on new technological tools that may be available to enhance format and function of electric services of AFS membership.

 

6.  Provide a summary of assessments to the Governing Board for the midyear and annual meetings, and more frequently to the AFS President if appropriate.

 

7.  Review the 5-year Plan for the AFS Web site and draft a schedule to implement recommendations outlined in the plan that have not been previously implemented.

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

1.   ESAB will meet by conference call at least twice each year at the discretion of the

Chair.

 

2.   The ESAB will have responsibility for organization and implementation of an IT workshop held each year at the AFS Annual Meeting to discuss developments in information technology and AFS electronic member services.

 

 

 

Endangered Species Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Provides leadership for the Society on issues affecting endangered species and their ecosystems.  Committee provides technical assistance to all levels of the Society on issues concerning endangered species.

 

Composition:

 

Includes the Chair of the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists (ASIH) Conservation Committee.  Members must have specific expertise in one or more endangered taxa.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

Specific duties and projects are assigned by the AFS President in consultation with the Committee Chair, and usually relate to updating AFS lists of imperiled organisms in certain taxonomic groups for publication in an AFS outlet, or developing new lists if they do not yet exist.  Duties also include developing and updating imperiled organism databases to be available on the AFS web site.

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

None specified at this time

 

 

 

Ethics and Professional Conduct Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Responsible for educating members about the Standards of Professional conduct. Authorized body to review any cases regarding ethics forwarded by the AFS President.

 

Composition:

 

The chair will be the longest serving member of the committee.  A new member shall be appointed by the AFS President each year to serve a five year term, and shall be selected from a broad spectrum of members to include representation from private, public, and academic employment sectors.  Ex-officio member is the First Vice-president.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

The Committee shall determine any procedures for evaluation of professional conduct, with special care to maintain a balanced and fair assessment.  The Committee shall maintain confidentiality with respect to all cases and is authorized to review the facts and findings of all prior ethics cases, where such cases may provide precedent or guidance to the Committee in reaching a decision.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

The committee will review documentation, and solicit more as appropriate, regarding allegations of ethics violations.  The Committee may, but is not required to, inform the accused about the nature of the complaint.  Communication with either the complainant or the accused may be necessary to secure required information.

 

After careful deliberation, the Committee will decide whether an ethics violation has occurred, and the Committee Chair will communicate the decision to the AFS President and the Executive Director.  The AFS President will inform both the complainant and the accused regarding the outcome of the Committee decision, but is not required to reveal the name of the complainant to the accused.

 

 

 

External Affairs Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Handles matters that will enhance the visibility of the Society to the media and general public and increase the Society’s interaction with the sport fishing, aquaculture, processor, and distributor segments of the fisheries community.  In addition, the committee is to promote activism for aquatic habitat and water quality issues.                                                                                               (Article IX 2.  J)

 

Composition:

 

At least six persons with staggered three-year terms; one-third of whom are appointed by each new AFS President who designates the Chair from among the Committee.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

Committee promotes activism for aquatic habitat and water quality issues.  Develops implementing direction and agenda for elements within the AFS Strategic Plan related to its charge.

 

This committee is responsible for administering the Student Writing Award and the

Excellence in Public Outreach Award.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

Need process and criteria for the two awards.

 

It has been suggested that AFS should poll its Units at least once every two years to determine who should be added to or deleted from its media list.  This polling function would be an appropriate task for this Committee.

 

It has been suggested that this Committee could help identify and generate ideas for good stories about fish, fisheries, and AFS member activities by contacting the AFS units, then working with the AFS staff (e.g., Fisheries editor) and the Outdoor Writers Association and other entities to get these “good stories” published in general public media.

 

 

 

Liaisons

 

Purpose:

Liaisons enhance communication and cooperation between the Society and allied professional societies, councils, federations and boards.

 

Composition:

Number as determined by the AFS President, appointed to a one-year term.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

1.   Serve an important role in representing the mission, activities, policies and concerns of the Society to the boards and members of other organizations.

2.   Establish and maintain communication between the Society and the allied organizations for mutual understanding and cooperation.

3.   Communicate with AFS Officers and Unit leaders (Section presidents and Committee chairs) about relevant activities and commitments of the allied organizations.

4.   Provide a report for the annual meeting about activities that occurred between the

Society and the allied organization during their year in service.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

None specified at this time

 

Investment Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Reviews Society investments and the performance of the Investment Manager and provides recommendations to the Executive Director and AFS President concerning the Investment Manager with the overall goal of growing capital.   (Article IX 1. K)

 

Composition:

 

Three AFS members including the Chair.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

Review the portfolio performance of the Investment Manager twice a year.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

Maintain the portfolio with as diverse composition as possible to take advantage of growth.  Additional guidelines are described in these Procedures “OPERATIONAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES”, section titled “INVESTMENT OBJECTIVES AND GUIDELINES”.

 

 

 

Meeting Oversight Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Provides overall meetings review for the Society to ensure coherent planning and development of Society and Unit meetings.  (Article IX 2. L)

 

Composition:

Seven AFS members including the AFS first vice-president. If review of Topics Oriented Meetings (TOMs) becomes a considerable task, the committee chair may request the AFS president to appoint a TOMs subcommittee of an additional four members.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

The Committee will provide guidance to AFS on how to improve efforts to attain Society goals (e.g., member services, information transfer and outreach, aquatic stewardship) through Society and Unit meetings. The Committee will formulate broad AFS meeting objectives and procedures to ensure the annual meeting is a meaningful gathering and consider the extent to which AFS should be involved actively in other types of meetings apart from the annual meeting (e.g., TOMs). The Committee will develop ideas regarding meeting-related elements in the overall AFS Strategic Plan and work with the AFS Strategic Planning Committee to incorporate its recommendations into the AFS Strategic Plan. Other duties may be assigned to the Committee by the AFS president as needed.

 

The Committee will also review and, if warranted, approve Topic Oriented Meetings (TOMs) submitted by AFS divisions, sections, chapters, or individual members. The committee will approve or reject each proposal based on scientific merit, general appeal, and timeliness of the topic. The committee may solicit comments from experts to assist in the review. Once approved, the proposal would be submitted to the AFS Executive Director to determine the extent of AFS financial support for the TOM. The Committee

 

will publicize by email, the AFS web site, articles in Fisheries, etc. the opportunity for AFS members to submit TOMs proposals. In addition, the committee will maintain contact with appropriate committees or individuals in other fisheries societies worldwide and international organizations with fisheries interests to stimulate joint sponsorship of TOMs, particularly at international locations.

 

Operational Guidelines:

None specified, except that a subcommittee to deal with TOMs may be requested in the future.

 

 

 

Membership Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Maintain or increase Society membership and recommend appropriate measures to attract new members and retain existing members. Monitor attitudes of members toward the Society by means of surveys, correspondence, and other avenues of communication. Recommend programs to address membership professional needs and problems.

 

Composition:

 

Up to nine members with staggered two-year terms; half of whom are appointed by each new AFS President who designates the Chair from among the Committee. Members will include the AFS First Vice-President, Second Vice-President, President-Elect, and Chairs of Division Membership Committees.

 

Duties:

 

1.   Through periodic revision and annual implementation of the Membership Recruitment and Retention Plan, institute activities to retain and increase AFS membership, working with the Governing Board and AFS staff as needed for policy approval and program implementation, respectively.

 

2.   Consult with previous year’s Committee in order to continue projects in progress and to

assess likely new projects.

 

3.   Coordinate activities with the Membership Coordinator and the Executive Director, especially regarding mailings and notices in Fisheries.

 

4.   Coordinate activities with Division and other unit Membership Committees to maximize benefits of all membership committee efforts.

 

5.   Contact Presidents of units and chairs of Society Committees to determine current membership concerns.

 

6.   Contact the Executive Director and Society officers regularly to determine if new or continuing membership concerns have developed or intensified. Identify appropriate Units or Officers who can address concerns noted by members and ensure necessary contacts are made for follow-up.

 

7.   Contact related natural resource societies to anticipate emerging membership concerns;

design and perform activities to gather data relative to those concerns.

 

8.   Every 3 to 5 years as deemed necessary by the Executive Director and the Officers, design and perform or oversee surveys that determine the extent and specific nature of identified concerns. Cooperate with other AFS Units in their survey designs to ensure that membership concerns are adequately addressed. Contract surveys with approval of the Executive Director.

 

9.   Recommend to the Governing Board changes in AFS structure, operation, and programs to improve membership satisfaction.

 

10. Develop direction and agenda for AFS Strategic Plan.

 

 

 

Names of Aquatic Invertebrates Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Reviews matters pertaining to the common and scientific names of aquatic invertebrates; prepares checklists of names to achieve uniformity and avoid confusion in nomenclature; coordinates its activities with those of other organizations worldwide.  Chair is the custodian of the master checklists.

 

Composition:

 

Chair plus any number of others, as deemed appropriate by the Chair, who are specialists in invertebrate taxonomy and nomenclature.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

1.  Chair maintains master file of common and scientific names of invertebrates.

 

2.  Prepares and updates AFS publications on common and scientific names of invertebrates.

 

3.  Monitors the scientific literature to determine needs for changes, clarifications, or systematic revisions of names or naming systems of invertebrates.

 

4.  Provides advice to AFS members and units regarding invertebrate name problems.

 

5.  Coordinates activities with similar organizations worldwide and with the Names of

Fishes Committee.

 

6.  Develops implementing direction and agenda for the AFS Strategic Plan.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

None specified at this time

 

 

 

Names of Fishes Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Reviews matters pertaining to the common and scientific names of fishes; prepares checklists of names to achieve uniformity and avoid confusion in nomenclature; coordinates its activities with those of other ichthyological organizations worldwide.

 

This is a joint committee with the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists (ASIH).  Committee members are jointly appointed by AFS and ASIH.  The Chair serves as custodian of the master checklist.

 

Composition:

 

Chair and six others who are specialists in systematic ichthyology and fisheries biology and members come from the United States, Canada, and Mexico.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

1.  Chair maintains file of master lists of common and scientific names of fishes.

 

2.  Typically, once a decade prepares and updates the AFS publication on common and scientific names of fishes.

 

3.  Monitors the scientific literature to determine need for changes, clarifications, or systematic revisions of names or naming systems of fishes.

 

4.  Provides advice to AFS staff, members, and units regarding relevant name problems.

 

5.  Coordinates activities with those of other ichthyological organizations worldwide and with the Names of Aquatic Invertebrates Committee.

 

6.  Develops implementing direction and agenda for the AFS Strategic Plan.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

The committee meets with its Advisory committee at each annual meeting of the

American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists.

 

In addition, two dedicated committee meetings of several days length are required, about

3 and 1 year before manuscript submission.

 

 

 

New Initiatives Coordinator

 

Purpose:

 

Assists the Governing Board, Officers and the Executive Director with solicitation and selection of strategic projects that enhance member and unit services while advancing the major goals and mission of the AFS.

 

Composition:

 

One person appointed from among the Management Committee members by the

President in consultation with the Management Committee to serve for a one-year term.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

The Coordinator considers proposals and may request clarification or merging of two or more initiatives that are similar.  The Coordinator prepares a list of proposed initiatives and presents the list, along with accompanying proposals, to the AFS Officers and Executive Director, no less than three weeks prior to the mid-year meeting.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

See the “PROCEDURES FOR IDENTIFYING AND IMPLEMENTING NEW

INITIATIVES” for details.

 

 

 

Nominating Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Prepares a slate of candidates for the Society offices of Second Vice-President, First Vice-President, and President-Elect according to procedures approved by the Governing Board.  It must name at least two candidates for Second Vice President.

 

Composition:

 

Ten members as follows:  Chair, appointed by the AFS President; one person elected by each Division (four in total); four persons elected by the Governing Board at the Annual Meeting; and the Immediate Past-President of the Society.  Each of the four Division Presidents should inform the incoming AFS President of the name of the Division’s elected representative to the Society Nominating Committee prior to the Annual Meeting. The newly-installed AFS President needs to have those names so they can be eliminated from consideration when the Governing Board elects its four members to the Nominating Committee during the Incoming Governing Board Meeting held following the Annual Business Meeting.

 

DUTIES:

 

The Chair of the Nominating Committee shall direct the nomination and voting procedure and tally the votes as outlined in the following steps. In order to comply with the specific and rigid timelines detailed in these procedures, the chair must contact the committee immediately after the AFS Annual Meeting and hold committee members to the

timetable.

 

1.  All ten members of the Committee, including the Chair, may nominate one or two candidates for Second Vice-President.  Accordingly, the number of candidates in any given year may be as many as twenty.

 

2.  Each Committee member shall vote on five of the candidates by assigning five points to the first preference, four points for second choice, etc.–one point for fifth choice.  The Chair may vote only if her/his signed ballot is mailed to the

AFS President at the same time as ballots are mailed to the other Nominating

Committee members.

 

3.  Votes will be evaluated by the Chair who determines the top two candidates on the basis of the highest point total.

 

4.  Total point ties for first and second, or second and third positions, go to the candidate with the greatest number of first place votes (5’s).  If a tie cannot be resolved by this procedure, then a second vote will be required.  In this case only the tied candidates are voted upon.  If a tie still remains after the second vote, the AFS President will cast the tie-breaking vote.

 

5.  Written results of the nomination and vote, including the ballots, shall be forwarded to the Executive Director or the AFS President for audit as soon as the two candidates for Second Vice-President have been determined by vote.  The Executive Director and the AFS President shall review the results before they are announced.

 

6.  The candidate in third place following the vote of the Committee and the candidate in second place after the general membership vote for Second Vice- President, shall automatically be considered as possible nominees by the Nominating Committee for the following year.  This last stipulation mandates forwarding the names and biographical information of those individuals to the Unit Services Coordinator at Headquarters for transmission to the Committee Chair for the following year.

 

7.  This is a confidential process; Committee members may not discuss the individuals on the list or the rankings with anyone other than other Committee members.

 

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

The duties are to be implemented as follows. With the consent of all committee members, all written materials including ballots may be exchanged among committee members electronically.

 

 

1.  A biographical sketch (background), some comments on the state of the Society (AFS involvement), and some steps that might be undertaken as AFS President to address major issues (Vision Statement) should be prepared by each candidate and forwarded by November15 to the member of the Committee advancing the candidate’s name for consideration. The statement should be no more than two type-written pages. Each Committee member shall inform his/her candidate(s) that the Committee does not encourage or appreciate receiving any additional vote solicitation contact or information.

 

2.  Each Committee member should submit the name(s) of his/her candidate(s), the biographical sketches, and comments to the Chair by November 20.

 

3.  The biographical sketches and comments by nominating committee members for all candidates will be forwarded with a ballot to all members of the Committee by December 1.

 

4.  Ballots should be returned to the Chair by December 15. The Committee Chair will communicate the results to the President and Executive Director

immediately.

 

 

 

5.  The Committee Chair shall notify the first- and second-ranked candidates as soon as he/she has been informed by the AFS President or Executive Director that they have audited the Committee Chair’s tally of the votes and have approved.  The Committee Chair shall let the remaining candidates know who placed first, second, and third and will

 

forward the third-ranked candidate’s file to the Unit Services Coordinator at

Headquarters for transmission to the next year’s Committee Chair.

 

 

6.  When notifying the winning candidates the Chair will request that they update or revise, if they wish, their biographical sketches and vision statements for AFS and send them to the Chair with a photograph by January 5.

 

 

7.  The Chair will forward these materials to the editor of Fisheries by an absolute deadline of January 10 so that the nominees will be announced in the February issue of Fisheries. The slate must be announced at least 60 days before election ballots are mailed to the AFS membership.  This will allow sufficient time for possible nominations by petition.

 

 

8. Following the election, the Committee Chair will forward the unsuccessful candidate’s file to the Unit Services Coordinator at Headquarters for transmission to the next year’s Committee Chair.

 

 

 

 Past  Cons titu tiona l  Consu ltant’s  Adv isory  Cou n cil

 

Purpose:

 

Advises Constitutional Consultant and the Executive Director on matters of parliamentary procedure.  Serves as a source of AFS history and practices about past society function and structure.  Identifies potential candidates for the Apprentice Constitutional Consultant.  (Article IX  2. R)

 

Composition:

 

All living past AFS Constitutional Consultants.  The Immediate Past Constitutional Consultant serves as chair and may assume the duties of the Constitutional Consultant, if that person is absent or unable to act.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

Provides advice and support to the Constitutional Consultant by researching issues of parliamentary procedure, drafting amendments and guidance documents, providing training, and other supportive functions as requested by the Constitutional Consultant, President, Executive Director, or other AFS leaders.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

None specified at this time.

 

 

 

 Past  Presid en ts’  Advi so ry  Coun cil

 

Purpose:

 

Advises the Governing Board and the Executive Director on matters of mutual interest. Serves as a source of AFS history and practices about past society activities.  Identifies ways or develops an organizational structure for greater participation for retirees. Identifies candidates for Honorary Membership in the Society.  (Article IX  2. R)

 

Composition:

 

All living past AFS Presidents.  The Immediate Past President serves as chair.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

Solicits nominations and selects the winners of The President’s Fishery Conservation Award, and the William E. Ricker Resource Conservation Award, and administers the Retired Members Travel Award to the AFS annual meeting.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

See the “SOCIETY AWARDS” section for details on the above mentioned awards.

 

 

 

Program Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Assembles  and administers the program for the annual Society meeting.  The Chair is selected four years in advance. (See Article III.1.C.iv in Constitution).

 

Composition:

 

Chair plus an indefinite number of others as desired by the AFS President and the Chair, appointed to one-year terms.  Also there should be three others who have been designated by successive Second Vice-Presidents and who will chair the Committee in succeeding years, thus serving a four-year term.  President-Elect is a member.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

1.  Plans, develops, and administers the technical program

 

2.  Records all changes and improvements in the procedures and forward to the next

year’s Chair and Society Headquarters.

 

3.  Develops implementing direction and agenda for the AFS Strategic Plan

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

None specified at this time

 

 

 

Publications Award Committee (See also Awards section of Procedures)

 

Purpose:

 

The committee evaluates articles and notes published in the five American Fisheries Society scientific journals for the preceding year to select the best paper published in each journal for respective awards.  The five annual awards are as follows:

 

1.   The Robert L. Kendall Award for the Best Paper in the Transactions of the

American Fisheries Society.

 

2.   The Mercer H. Patriarche Best Paper Award for the North American Journal of

Fisheries Management.

 

3.   The Best Paper in the North American Journal of Aquaculture.

 

4.   The Best Paper in the Journal of Aquatic Animal Health.

 

5.   The Best Paper in Marine and Coastal Fisheries: Dynamics, Management, and

Ecosystem Science.

 

Composition:

 

The committee is composed of five subcommittees, one for each journal and award. Committee membership consists of the Committee Chair, five Subcommittee Chairs, and a minimum of five additional members of each subcommittee.  Committee Chair is appointed by the AFS President; Subcommittee Chairs are appointed by the AFS President in consultation with the Committee Chair; and Subcommittee members are appointed by the AFS President in consultation with the Committee Chair and respective Subcommittee Chairs.  Committee membership is selected to reflect diversity in demography, geography, and expertise.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

1.   Committee Chair solicits participation and recommends Subcommittee Chairs to AFS President for appointment.  Subcommittee Chairs solicit participation and recommend subcommittee members to the Committee Chair and AFS President for appointment.

 

2.   Committee Chair provides Subcommittee Chairs with guidance on subcommittee member selection and procedures to evaluate papers.  In general, paper evaluation will consist of a two-stage process of review and ranking, with each

subcommittee member evaluating all papers published in the applicable volume. The first round of evaluation and subsequent voting is designed to select a subset of finalist papers to be reconsidered as the best paper.  The second round of voting will select the best paper from that subset determined in the first round.

Procedural details may vary among years, as developed and refined by the Committee Chair with suggestions from Subcommittee Chairs, but should be consistent among subcommittees within a year.

 

3.   Subcommittee Chairs will provide their subcommittee’s best paper selection to

the Committee Chair, who will compile results and forward to the AFS President. Upon approval from the AFS President, the Committee Chair or AFS President will notify award recipients of their honor.  Committee members will receive letters of acknowledgment and gratitude from the Subcommittee Chairs, Committee Chair, or the AFS President.  Best papers and award recipients should be selected well in advance of 60 days before the Annual Meeting to allow adequate time for award preparation and announcements.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

Criteria for the Best Paper Award for AFS Journals

 

1.   As a minimum, the paper should satisfy the basic concerns as established in the Guide for Reviewers for Transactions of the American Fisheries Society.  Some of those are summarized as follows:

 

a.  Is the paper understandable, scientifically sound, and technically reliable?

 

b.  Are the statistical tests, if any, appropriate for the data and correctly applied?

 

c.  Are the conclusions adequately supported by the data?

 

d.  Is the contribution sufficiently integrated with existing knowledge?

 

2.   If the paper reports experimental work, it should indicate that the study had a

clear objective or hypothesis that was rigorously tested, and was well planned and methodically executed.  Consideration should be given to studies that show creative original design or present new approaches for solving problems associated with fish biology.

 

3.   If the paper is descriptive in nature (for example, of a disease process or a previously unknown phenomenon), it should cover the subject thoroughly and in a clear, concise, logical manner.

 

4.   If a review paper, the article should cover the literature completely and objectively, and represent a critical, up-to-date synthesis of the subject.

 

5.   If there are alternative explanations for results or conclusions presented, those arguments should be adequately addressed in the paper.

 

6.   The paper should hold the interest of specialists in the particular field as well as being clearly understandable and interesting for a general fisheries audience and other members of the scientific community.  In that context, both content and presentation are important considerations.

 

7.   The length of the paper should be sufficient to reflect the extent of work involved and discuss the results thoroughly, but not be overly repetitive or too long.

Length itself should not be a criterion.

 

 

 

Publications Overview Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Provides overall publication and editorial review for the Society to ensure coherent planning and development of Society and unit publication programs.

 

Composition:

 

At least nine persons with staggered three-year terms, at least three of whom shall be appointed by each new AFS President who shall also designate the Chair from among the whole Committee; the Publications Manager is a nonvoting member and the President- Elect is a voting member.

 

.

 

Duties:

 

 

1.  Monitors publication activities and decisions to ensure conformance with established practices and policies.

 

2.  Evaluates current and proposed practices and policies; reports evaluation to the

Governing Board, Executive Director, and Publications Manager as appropriate.

 

3.  Interprets editorial and publication policies and practices at the request of AFS

members and staff.

 

4.  Assists the Publications Manager in the administration of the publications functions of the Society.

 

5.  Anticipates publication and editorial concerns of the profession and Society; performs necessary activities to gather data or opinions as the basis for anticipated changes in publication or editorial functions.

 

6. Develops and helps implement a strategic plan for AFS publications.

 

7.  Develops implementing direction and agenda for the AFS Strategic Plan.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

None specified at this time

 

 

 

Raffle Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Administers the Society raffle at the Annual Meeting.  The proceeds to be divided as follows:  70% to the AFS Skinner Fund, 30% to the local unit hosting the raffle.  If no local host then 100% to the Skinner Fund.

 

Composition:

 

Committee is composed of members of the local host unit.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

Solicit prizes, recognize sponsors, organize and coordinate selling of tickets and publicity, conduct raffle at meeting, write thank you letters to sponsors, mail unclaimed prizes.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

None specified at this time

 

 

 

Resolutions Committee

 

Purpose:

 

The Committee drafts resolutions, screens and edits resolutions submitted to it by officers, members, or units, and presents its slate of resolutions for vote at the Society’s Annual Meeting.  The two types of resolutions include internal resolutions, which relate

 

entirely to AFS matters, and external resolutions, which relate to broad national or international issues outside of AFS.

 

Composition:

 

Nine members, which include the Chairs of the four Division Resolutions Committees and five others appointed by the AFS President.  Chair is appointed by AFS President from among these nine; First Vice-President and the Chair of the Resource Policy are members.

 

Duties:

 

1.   Chair solicits resolutions from all units and committee chairs in the fall, urging early submittal to receive proper consideration.  Chapter-based resolutions should receive prior Division action before submission to Resolutions Committee; those sent directly without Division acknowledgement or action will be returned to the Division Resolutions Committee.

 

2.   Internal resolutions may be received at any time and do not require approval by the Governing Board; external resolutions must be received by Chair at least 60 days before the Annual Meeting and much sooner if possible.  Adequate time is needed for Committee review.  Resolutions submitted less than 30 days prior to the Annual Meeting or at the meeting should be limited to emergency situations.

 

3.   Committee develops and presents at the annual AFS Business Meeting an internal resolution recognizing the efforts of the Local Arrangements Committee and the Program Committee in hosting and organizing the annual meeting.  The Chair communicates with the Unit Services Coordinator at Headquarters to ensure commemorative plaques are available to be presented to the appropriate Arrangements and Program committee chairs.

 

4.   Chair serves as a member of the Resource Policy Committee to coordinate with that

Committee regarding issues identified by both or either Committee.

 

5.   Committee reviews all external resolutions it receives from AFS subunits to determine whether or not the issue is suitable for a national external resolution as per the AFS Policy Statement on Advocacy. The Committee will decide whether the issue under consideration is most suitably addressed with either a Resource Policy, a Position

Statement, a Legislative Briefing Statement or a Resolution. In brief, resolutions are issue statements that are peer-reviewed by committees and approved by members online or at

an official Society or subunit meeting. They are less analytical than position statements or legislative briefing statements but must be consistent with them (and with policies).

 

6.   Resource policies are general statements of principle about resource topics that explain and justify the Society’s perspective or attitude in largely philosophical terms. Resource policies are reviewed and approved by the membership and have a long life span, perhaps

10-20 years.

 

7.   Position statements are specific stands on specific issues. They are prepared by experts, scientifically documented, and rigorously reviewed. They must be consistent with Society policies, and they are approved by the Society’s Governing Board or a subunit executive committee (depending on their level of applicability).

 

8.   Legislative briefing statements are specific stands on specific items of legislation. They are developed and approved like position statements, with which they must be consistent.

 

9.   Committee will only deal with matters deemed appropriate for a resolution. Matters considered best handled by resource policies, position statements and legislative briefing statements will be referred to the President by the Chair.

 

10. Committee reviews proposed external resolutions to determine that they meet criteria as described in the “Procedures for Submitting, Considering, and Implementing Resolutions,” established by the Executive Committee in 1983.

 

11. Committee votes on all proposed external resolutions to determine which should be recommended for consideration by the AFS membership. The committee then forwards the recommended external resolutions to the Governing Board to determine whether the resolution should be published for review by the membership.

 

12. If deemed appropriate by the Committee and Governing Board, external resolutions and all supporting rationale or justification documents will be posted to the AFS website in a secure format (e.g., pdf) and notice of such postings shall be sent to all members by electronic mail. If time permits, a notice will be published in Fisheries, directing members to review the draft resolution  on the AFS website. When feasible, members will be given at least 30 days to review and comment on the resolution. Members shall submit comments online and also by email to the Chair.

 

13. After the member comment period, the Chair should consolidate all comments and work with the Resolutions Committee to develop a response memo within 30 days. This response memo should identify the Committee’s recommendation on whether the public comments were substantive enough to require major editing and/or withdrawal of the external resolution, or if only minor editing is needed.

 

14. The Chair presents the external resolution and response memo to the Governing Board, either electronically or at the Governing Board’s annual business meeting. Within 60

days, the Governing Board will make a decision as to whether to pursue membership vote of the resolution, and if the vote should take place electronically or at the Society

Business Meeting. Electronic voting should follow established procedures.

 

15. If voting takes place at the Society Business Meeting, the Chair, or a representative, presents resolutions to the membership at the Annual Meeting on each resolution by moving acceptance of the resolution.  (Note:  Although the Chair presents the resolution, she/he is not obliged to defend or speak in favor of the resolution.)

 

16. Approved resolutions are published in Fisheries and posted in a secure format on the

AFS website.

 

17. Committee recommends direction and agenda for the AFS Strategic Plan to implement approved resolutions as needed.

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

See “Procedure for Submitting, Considering, and Implementing Resolutions.”

 

Resource Policy Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Committee helps the Society evaluate, develop and maintain resource policies by assessing concerns of the membership, advising the AFS President and Executive Director about aquatic resource issues, producing or coordinating draft resource policy statements for Society approval, and reviewing approved policies to ensure usefulness.

 

Composition:

 

Chair, Vice-Chair and up to fifteen members, appointed for staggered 2 year terms. Membership is renewable for an additional two terms for a maximum total of 6 years. No more than eight members should be replaced during any one calendar year.  At least one member shall be from Canada or Mexico. The President-Elect is a voting member.

The Editor of Fisheries, Executive Director, and Policy and Development Coordinator shall be nonvoting members.  In alternate years, the incoming Society President appoints the Vice-Chair who shall serve for two years, followed by two years as the Chair. The cycle can be adjusted if the President asks the current Chair to serve an additional term. The Chair shall serve no more than two consecutive 2 year terms, but may return as a Committee member or Chair after a hiatus of at least 1 year. The combination of terms and roles is intended to provide opportunities for broad membership representation on the Committee.

 

Duties:

 

1.   Guides the process to prepare policy statements for Society approval according to “Protocol for Establishing American Fisheries Society Policy Statements,” and “Guide for the Submission of AFS Policy Statements.”

 

2.   Coordinates with the Executive Director and other Society representatives to seek scientific analysis on important resource issues resulting in recommendations for guidance, approaches, or positions that AFS can endorse.

 

3.   Works with AFS staff to write to appropriate individuals about AFS positions on resource issues.

 

4.   Assesses resource concerns of the membership and determines the need for developing policy statements, working closely with other AFS units.

 

5.   Coordinates activities with Resolutions Committee Chair, forwarding issues that should be covered by resolutions.

 

6.   Invites suggestions from all AFS units on issues that could be covered by a new AFS

policy.

 

7.   Recommends direction and agenda for the AFS Strategic Plan to implement approved policy statements as needed.

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

See “Procedure for Developing and Advancing Resource Issues” and “Procedures for

Developing and Advancing AFS Resource Policy Statements.”

 

Time and Place Committee

 

Purpose:

 

Generates competitive proposals for the site of the AFS meeting four years hence from which the Governing Board shall choose one site.

 

Composition:

 

Nine voting members including the Chair.  The incoming AFS President shall designate the Chair from among the whole committee. Six members will have staggered three-year terms, two of whom shall be appointed by each new AFS President.  Voting members also include the immediate past General Meeting Chair (Chair of Arrangements Committee) and the current Second Vice-President. The newly-elected incoming Second

Vice-President who will be presiding over the meeting for which time and place are being selected participates in committee deliberations, including reviewing the presentations by bidders, and casts a vote only in case of a tie. Voting is conducted by secret ballot.

 

 

Duties:

 

 

 

1.  Solicit, with the help of the AFS staff, proposals to host the Annual Meeting from state/provincial agencies, AFS Chapters, or other organizations located within the Division in which the meeting is to be held four years hence.

 

2.  Provide prospective bidders, through AFS staff, with the guidelines and format for preparing a written bid package and oral presentation to the Committee at the Annual Meeting.

 

3.  Screen written proposals prior to the Annual Meeting to determine which are acceptable on the basis of specific guidelines established in the bid package.

 

4.  Chair notifies acceptable bidders to prepare an oral presentation for the Time and

Place Committee meeting to be held during the Annual Meeting.

 

5.  Meet during Annual Meeting to hear oral presentations from prospective bidders. Evaluation of bids is based both on oral and written proposals and a recommendation is prepared for the Incoming Governing Board.

 

6.  Chair presents options for time and place to the Incoming Governing Board which is the final authority on the site selection.

 

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

None specified at this time

 

 

 

Vote Auditor

 

Purpose:

 

Verifies voting results and/or counts the election ballots, transmits the results to the AFS President and/or Unit Officer and Executive Director within the designated number of days of the closing date of the vote or election, and announces the results at the annual Society meeting or as appropriate.  The Vote Auditor sends electronic results and/or

 

ballots to the Executive Director, who shall hold them at least 90 days after the close of the vote or election.

 

Composition:

 

Vote Auditor and Co-Auditor are appointed by the AFS President for staggered two-year terms.

 

Duties:

 

1. Works with the AFS Officers or other unit leaders in the development of fair and equitable voting procedures designed to ensure that each member has an opportunity to vote confidentially and only once.

 

2. Participates in the selection of services to provide electronic voting capabilities to the Society.  Individual units may be responsible for their own voting services, as appropriate.

 

3. May communicate with the service provider to obtain specific information on the process (e.g., adequate provisions for notification, accuracy, secrecy, equity, and qualification of voters).

 

4. In the case of Officer elections, works with the Executive Director to ensure that the Ballot is prepared and transmitted to the membership in May, with a 30-day response period that typically closes at the end of June.

 

5.  Checks with electronic ballot service provider periodically to ensure election is running smoothly. As necessary, the Vote Auditor may count paper ballots received from members who do not have electronic access for voting.

 

6.  Verifies results within 30 days after the deadline for ballot returns.

 

7.  Transmits results to AFS President or appropriate Unit Officers and Executive

Director immediately after verification or counting of votes.

 

8.  Protects confidentiality of these processes; results shall not be discussed with anyone other than the AFS President or appropriate Unit Officers and the Executive Director.

 

Operational Guidelines:

 

None specified at this time

 

SOCIETY AWARDS

 

 

The Awards Committee, a Standing Committee within the Society, is responsible for overseeing most Society awards.  However, several Society awards are administered by other Standing Committees or Sections.  The Unit Services Coordinator is the Staff contact person for award chairs.  Award recipients are formally announced during the Annual Meeting.  See also the Standing and Special Committees section for more information about the Awards Committee and Publications Award Committee.

 

 

 

Award of Excellence

 

Background:  This award was established in 1969 and is the Society’s highest award for scientific achievement. The award is presented to a living person for original and outstanding contributions to fisheries and aquatic biology. Eligibility is not restricted to AFS members. The award consists of a bronze medal, a certificate mounted in a plaque, and travel and related expenses if needed (no greater than $1,000) to attend the Annual Meeting for presentation of the award.

 

Committee composition:  The Chair, plus at least six others, appointed by the AFS President.

 

Duties: Seeks nominations and selects the recipient of the Award of Excellence by fulfilling duties as described in the Awards Committee Section of the Procedures and by developing and implementing a method for selecting a recipient from among the candidates submitted (no more than one recipient per year may be selected; the committee may vote to select no recipient).

 

Criteria:  A monumental work; original techniques or research methods; new, fresh ideas, viewpoints, or data that contribute remarkably to conservation management or basic understanding of aquatic resources; a new, successfully executed fishery research or management program of national or international importance; imaginative and successful programs in fish conservation, education at any level of teaching or graduate student guidance; important faunal or ecological discoveries or new taxonomic criteria; research especially beneficial to mankind; interdisciplinary research involving leadership in team efforts in the laboratory or field; or multiple successful efforts in a variety of fields such as biology, public understanding, technical and popular writing, laboratory and field research, inspirational leadership, and enunciation of principles.  The nomination should include a CV and supporting letters in addition to the main nomination letter.  Include the nominee’s title and full contact information (address, email, and phone).

 

Specifications and limitations:  The award will only be made in such years as there is

substantial or unanimous agreement among members of the Award of Excellence Committee that an award is justified.

 

 

 

 

Carl R. Sullivan Fishery Conservation Award

 

Background:  This award, known as the “Sully,” was created in 1991 and was first awarded to

Carl Sullivan shortly before his death.   It is awarded annually in his memory.  It is given to an

 

individual or organization, professional or nonprofessional, for outstanding contributions to the conservation of fishery resources (as opposed to the Ricker award’s focus on aquatic resource conservation). Eligibility is not restricted to AFS members.  The award consists of a fish carving. Accomplishments can include political, legal, educational, scientific, and managerial successes.

 

Committee composition:  This subcommittee is composed of the AFS President-Elect as Chair; three AFS Section representatives who are presidents in the year of their appointment; three members representing the conservation, recreational fishing, and commercial fishing communities respectively; and the First Vice-President.  Appointments of subcommittee members are made by the President-Elect, following consultation with the President and First Vice-President.  The Chair serves 1 year, the other members serve 3 years, with two members rotating off annually.

 

Duties: Seeks nominations and selects the recipient of the award by fulfilling duties as described in the Awards Committee Section of the Procedures. The recipient will be selected by a majority vote of the subcommittee following a review of the nominees’ qualifications. The nominations of unsuccessful candidates are to be automatically carried forward so that the candidate is

considered three times before re-nomination is necessary.  Nominations should be forwarded to the Unit Services Coordinator and First Vice-President.

 

Criteria:

 

1.   The recipient must have made a substantial contribution, of national or international significance, with a high probability of focusing attention of the fisheries community on the continuing need to use our fisheries resources wisely.  The contribution may be single or lifelong, focused on broad, site-specific, or geographically extensive accomplishments.

2.   The recipient’s contribution will likely become widely known in the fisheries community

because it will effect substantive beneficial changes in the understanding, management, or use of fishery resources.

3.   The recipient’s contribution may be in any area of fishery conservation, including research, management, education, public service, or leadership which effects a positive change benefiting fishery resources.

 

The nomination should include a CV and supporting letters in addition to the main nomination

letter.  Include the nominee’s title and full contact information (address, email, and phone).

 

 

 

 

Distinguished Service Award

 

Background:  This award was established in 1980 and is presented in recognition of outstanding contributions of time and energy for special projects or activities by AFS members. The number of recipients may vary from year to year, with no mandatory number to be selected.  A single member, a group of members, and AFS staff are eligible candidates.  The award consists of a certificate mounted in a plaque.

 

Committee composition:  Chaired by the AFS President-Elect with at least two other Governing

Board members or immediate past members, each representing a different Division and appointed by the AFS President.

 

Duties: Seeks nominations and selects the recipient(s) of the AFS Distinguished Service Award by fulfilling duties as described in the Awards Committee Section of the Procedures.  The committee screens and distributes the final list of candidates, with a biographical sketch or nomination statement for each, to the AFS President. The President facilitates a vote by the Governing Board to select award recipients.

 

Criteria: Criteria are given above in the Background section.

 

 

 

 

Emmeline Moore Prize

 

Background:  AFS established a career achievement award, named after the first female AFS president, Emmeline Moore (1927-1928), to recognize efforts of an AFS member in the promotion of demographic diversity in the society. This award is presented to a member who demonstrates strong commitment and exemplary service to ensuring equal opportunity access to higher education in fisheries and/or professional development in the broad range of fisheries science disciplines. Qualified nominees must exhibit clear evidence of service and commitment to diversity initiatives, including a strong research or fisheries management leadership background, public understanding of diversity issues, technical and popular writing, and inspirational leadership. Candidates should also have enunciated principles that lead to greater involvement of under-represented groups in fisheries science, education, research or

management. The award consists of a bronze medal, a certificate, and travel and related expenses if needed (no greater than $1,000) to attend the AFS Annual Meeting for presentation of the

prize.

 

Committee composition: The Chair, appointed by the AFS President, plus the presidents of the following Sections if active: Equal Opportunities Section, Education Section, International Fisheries Section, Canadian Aquatic Resources Section, Fisheries Administration Section, Fisheries History Section, Native Peoples Fisheries Section, and at least one AFS member at large. The chair may be one of the Section Presidents named above.

 

Duties: Seeks nominations and selects the recipient of the Emmeline Moore Prize by fulfilling duties as described in the Awards Committee Section of the Procedures and by developing and implementing a method for selecting a recipient from among the candidates submitted (no more than one recipient per year may be selected; the committee may vote to select no recipient).

 

Criteria:

 

1.   The recipient has made outstanding contribution to improvements in access to higher education or the fisheries professions by under-represented groups.

2.   The recipient has made multiple successful efforts in a variety of fields such as biology, public understanding, technical and popular writing, inspirational leadership, and enunciation of principles that lead to a greater involvement of under-represented groups in fisheries education, research and management.

3.   This award is a career achievement award.

 

The nomination should include a CV and supporting letters in addition to the main nomination letter.  Include the nominee’s title and full contact information (address, email, and phone).

 

Specifications and limitations: The award will only be made in such years as there is substantial or unanimous agreement among members of the Emmeline Moore Prize Committee that an award is justified.

 

 

 

 

Excellence in Fisheries Education Award

 

Background:  The Excellence in Fisheries Education Award was established in 1988. The award is presented to an AFS member to recognize excellence in organized teaching and advising in some aspect of fisheries education. Nominees may be involved in extension or continuing education, as well as traditional or online college and university instruction. The award includes

a monetary reward and a certificate mounted in a plaque.

Committee composition: The award is administered by the AFS Education Section. Duties: Selection of the award recipient; details determined by the AFS Education Section. Criteria:  Nominees must have been actively engaged in fisheries education within the past 5

years, and have had at least 10 years of professional employment experience in fisheries education. Two or more people may serve as nominators, but at least one nominator must be an AFS member. The nomination should include a CV and supporting letters in addition to the main nomination letter.  Include the nominee’s title and full contact information (address, email, and phone).  Letters documenting the contributions of the nominee (awards, descriptions of exemplary service, innovations, number of students taught and advised, and post graduate achievements of former students, etc.) are used to evaluate nominees.

 

 

 

 

Excellence in Public Outreach Award

 

Background:  This award was established in 1998.  It is presented to an AFS member who goes the “extra mile” in sharing the value of fisheries science/research with the general public through the popular media and other communication channels.  Evidence of the nominee teaching others how to communicate with the public also is weighed in the selection process. The award consists of a certificate mounted in a plaque.

 

Committee composition:  The award is administered by the AFS External Affairs Committee.

 

Duties: Selection of the award recipient; details determined by the AFS External Affairs

Committee.

 

Criteria: Two or more individuals may act as nominators, but at least one nominator must be an

AFS member. Entries must include a biographical sketch of the nominee (not to exceed three

 

pages) and supporting evidence of communicating the value of fisheries issues/research to the general public through the media and other communication channels, plus any evidence of teaching others about communication with the public. The award recipient will be selected according to the following criteria:  1) Published articles about research or fisheries management in lay publications; 2) experience as a spokesperson for fisheries issues with the media and public; 3) experience teaching others about the importance of communication with the public through course work and or projects; and 4) other examples of personal and professional efforts to educate the public about fisheries issues.  The nomination should include a CV and supporting letters in addition to the main nomination letter.  Include the nominee’s title and full contact information (address, email, and phone).

 

 

 

 

Golden Membership

 

Background:  These awards were first presented in 1988 to recognize 50 years of AFS

membership.  The award is a certificate mounted in a plaque.

 

 

 

 

Honorary Membership

 

Background:  This award is documented under Article II (a) (3) of the Constitution.  Briefly stated, Honorary Members are nominated upon presentation of a petition, signed by at least 100 active AFS members, and approval is subject to a vote by the membership.  Since 1989,

however, sometimes the process has been formalized by the appointment of a Special Committee by the AFS President to provide nominating petitions.  Upon election to Honorary Membership by a 2/3 majority of the voting members, the individual receives permanent dues-free membership and is awarded a certificate attesting to the honor.

 

Criteria: Presented to individuals who have achieved outstanding professional accomplishments or have given outstanding service to the Society.

 

 

 

 

J. Frances Allen Scholarship

 

Background: This $2,500 scholarship was established in 1986 honoring Dr. Allen, who pioneered women’s involvement in AFS and in the field of fisheries, with the intent of encouraging women to become fisheries professionals.  It is awarded annually to a female doctoral candidate who was an AFS member of record by the end of the year preceding application.  The applicant must be conducting aquatic research, which includes all branches of fisheries science and practice.

 

Committee composition:  Administered and determined by the AFS Equal Opportunities

Section

 

Duties: Selection of the award recipient; details determined by the AFS Equal Opportunities

Section

 

Criteria: Recipients are selected with emphasis placed on research promise, scientific merit, and academic achievement.

 

 

 

 

John E. Skinner Memorial Award

 

Background: This award was established in 1978 in memory of John E. Skinner, former President of the California-Nevada Chapter and the Western Division.  The fund provides monetary travel awards to deserving graduate students or exceptional undergraduate students who are active in the fisheries discipline, current AFS members, and who would like to attend the annual meeting.  The award consists of a certificate mounted in a plaque.

 

Committee composition: Recipients are chosen by a committee of the AFS Education Section with composition determined by that section.

 

Duties:  Selection of award recipients; details determined by the AFS Education Section.

 

Criteria:  Selections are based on academic qualifications, professional service and promise, and reasons for wanting to attend the meeting.  Generally, only partial travel support is available in order to distribute the awards to a larger number of deserving recipients.  In 2003 a goal was added to have a minimum of one qualified student from Canada and one from Mexico.

 

 

 

 

Meritorious Service Award

 

Background:  This award, first presented in 1986, is awarded annually to an individual AFS member for unswerving loyalty, dedication, and meritorious service to AFS over a long time; and for exceptional commitment to AFS programs, ideals, objectives, and long-term goals. The award consists of a plaque.

 

Committee composition: The chair and four other members of this subcommittee, one of whom is the Second Vice-President, are appointed by the AFS President.

 

Duties: Seeks nominations and selects the recipient of the award by fulfilling duties as described in the Awards Committee Section of the Procedures and by developing and implementing a method for selecting a recipient from among the candidates submitted (no more than one recipient per year may be selected; the committee may vote to select no recipient).

 

Criteria:  Criteria are given above in the Background section.  The nomination should include a CV and supporting letters in addition to the main nomination letter.  Include the nominee’s title and full contact information (address, email, and phone).

 

Outstanding Chapters and Student Subunit Awards

 

Background:  The Outstanding Chapter Award was established in 1991 to recognize outstanding professionalism, active resource protection and enhancement programs, and commitment to the mission of the Society. In 2003 the award was broken into two categories,

one for a chapter having fewer than 100 members (Small Chapter) and another for a chapter with

100 or more members (Large Chapter).  In 2004, a third award for a Student Subunit was added. The award consists of a certificate mounted in a plaque.

 

Committee composition:  The four committee members are the AFS Divisions’ immediate Past- Presidents.  The AFS President chooses a Chair from among them.

 

Duties: Seeks nominations and selects the recipient of the award by fulfilling duties as described in the Awards Committee Section of the Procedures. Distributes Outstanding Chapters and Student Subunit Award Applications among Chapters, Student Subunits, and Divisions, and informs them of procedures.  Chapters and Student Subunits must submit applications to their Division Presidents for consideration. Division Presidents may nominate up to one large Chapter, one small Chapter, and one Student Subunit from their Divisions.  Committee members evaluate

and vote on the three categories of outstanding chapters as follows: 1st Place Vote- 4 points; 2nd Place Vote- 3 points; 3rd Place Vote- 2 points; 4th Place Vote- 1 point.  For each category, the Chapters or Subunit with most total points is the recipient.  In the case of a tie the Chapters or Subunit with the most first place votes wins.  If the tie still stands, two awards are given.

 

Criteria:  The awards are to be given to Chapters and Subunits that exhibit a commitment to the mission of the Society by actively working to achieve the goals set forth in the Society’s Strategic Plan. The criteria are described in the Outstanding Chapters and Student Subunit

Award Applications, available on the AFS website.

 

 

 

 

 Pr esid en t’s  Fish ery  Co n servation  Aw ard

 

Background:  This award, established in 1995, is presented in two categories: (1) an AFS member or unit, and (2) a non-AFS individual or entity, for singular accomplishments or long- term contributions that advance aquatic resource conservation at a regional or local level (as opposed to the Ricker and Sully awards’ focus on national or international accomplishments). The award consists of a plaque.

 

Committee composition: This award is administered by the Past President’s Advisory Council. The AFS Immediate Past-President serves as chair of the Council and all living past-presidents are Council members.

 

Duties: Seeks nominations and recommends possible recipients of the award to the AFS President by fulfilling duties as described in the Awards Committee Section of the Procedures. The Council will review qualifications of all nominees. A ballot will be provided to each council member to vote for one of three options for each nominee: 1) “yes, qualifies for the award”; 2) “no, not this year but retain in the pool for the next two years”; or 3) “no, not qualified, remove from further consideration unless re-nominated in a future year.” Unsuccessful nominees from a

 

given year will either be removed from the pool if deemed unqualified by a majority of voting Council members, or will remain in the pool and be eligible for reconsideration for the two immediately following years.  Nominees who receive affirmative votes from a majority of voting members shall be recommended to the AFS President. The AFS President makes the final decision on awards.

 

Criteria: Criteria are given above in the Background section. A nomination package should include a strong and detailed letter describing the nominee’s accomplishments and the evidence for being “significant at a regional or local level.”  If the nomination is for an individual, include a CV if possible. Nominations may be supported by multiple individuals by signing one nomination letter, or by submitting supporting letters in addition to the main nomination letter. Include the nominee’s title and full contact information (address, email, and phone). Nominations for the AFS Individual or Entity category should include an endorsement from a relevant AFS Unit (Chapter, Division, or Section) attesting to the member’s activity in the Society.

 

 

 

 

Publication Awards

 

Background:  These awards have a long history, starting with an award to the best paper in the oldest journal, The Best Paper in the Transactions of the American Fisheries Society. As new journals were published, each of these also presented annual awards for best papers. The recipients are selected by the Publication Awards Committee, appointed by the AFS President, with a member or members selected by the Editor of each of the AFS journals. The award consists of a certificate mounted in a plaque.

 

The awards are as follows: 1) the Robert L. Kendall Best Paper in the Transactions of the American Fisheries Society for the year preceding presentation; 2) the Mercer H. Patriarche Best Paper Award for the North American Journal of Fisheries Management for the year preceding presentation; 3) the Best Paper in the North American Journal of Aquaculture for the year preceding presentation; 4) the Best Paper in the Journal of Aquatic Animal Health; and 5) the Best Paper in Marine and Coastal Fisheries: Dynamics, Management, and Ecosystem Science

for the year preceding presentation.

 

Committee composition, Duties, Criteria:  See Publication Awards Committee.

 

 

 

 

Retired Members Travel Award for the AFS Annual Meeting

 

Background:  Established in 2004, this travel award is to encourage and enable retired members of the Society to attend annual meetings, particularly those members who might play a more active role in the meeting.  The Society recognizes that some retired members who desire to participate in the annual meeting might be inhibited for financial reasons.  Retired members may not have funds for travel to meetings that were available to them while employed.  Therefore,

this award is meant for those members who truly have a need for financial assistance.  The

Society has neither means nor desire to verify financial need, so that requests for support are

 

based on an honor system. However, only dues paying retired members are eligible to apply.  A maximum of $1,500 may be awarded for reimbursable expenses.  Multiple awards may be given in any year, subject to the total available amount specified in the AFS budget.

 

Committee composition:  The chair of the Past Presidents’ Advisory Council chairs the committee and will appoint two other members of the committee from the Council.

 

Duties:  Select the recipient(s) by fulfilling duties as described in the Awards Committee Section of the Procedures.  The committee selects potential recipients of the award, and the chair may negotiate with potential recipients to maximize the number of awards.  The chair informs recipients of the amount they will be reimbursed and also informs the AFS Unit Services Coordinator and the Executive Director.

 

Criteria: The award is based on the totality of the contribution that the applicant will make to the AFS Annual Meeting. The committee will consider the activities that the applicant will participate in and other relevant information provided by the applicant.

 

 

 

Steven Berkeley Marine Conservation Fellowship

Background:  This fellowship was created by AFS in 2007 to honor the memory of Steven Berkeley, a dedicated fisheries scientist with a passionate interest in integrating the fields of marine ecology, conservation biology, and fisheries science to improve fisheries management. Berkeley was a long-time member of AFS and a member of the first Board of Directors of the Fisheries Conservation Foundation. The fellowship comprises a competitively based $10,000 award to a graduate student actively engaged in thesis research relevant to marine conservation. Research topics may address any aspect of conservation; a focus on fisheries issues is not required.

 

Committee composition: The award is administered by the AFS Marine Fisheries Section

 

Duties: Selection of the award recipient; details determined by the AFS Marine Fisheries

Section.

 

Criteria:  The fellowship will be awarded on the basis of the relevance of the proposed research, academic achievement, and anticipated future contributions by the applicant.

 

Student Paper-Poster Awards

 

Background:  These awards were established to recognize excellence in research and communication skills among students.  The awards are administered by the Education Section and recipients are selected by a committee of abstract reviewers and presentation judges. Awardees are announced during the annual meeting during the year of presentation.

 

AFS/ SEA Grant Best Student Paper Award

 

Background: This award is co-sponsored by AFS and Sea Grant.  One paper is selected each year.  The student presenting the papers receives a check for $450 and a plaque.   Students selected for an Honorable Mention receive a plaque but no monetary compensation.

 

AFS Best Student Poster Award

 

Background: This award is sponsored by AFS.  One poster is selected each year.  The student presenting the poster receives a check for $450 and a plaque. Students selected for an Honorable Mention receive a plaque but no monetary compensation.

 

Committee composition:  Recipients are chosen by a committee of the AFS Education Section with composition determined by that section.

 

Duties:  Selection of award recipients; details determined by the AFS Education Section.

 

Criteria:  Based on the significance of the material presented and the quality of the presentation. Details determined by the AFS Education Section.

 

 

 

 

Student Writing Award

 

Background:  Undergraduate and graduate students are asked to submit a 500- to 700-word article explaining their own research or a research project in their lab or school. The article must be written in language understandable to the general public (i.e., journalistic style). Students may write about research that has been completed, is in progress, or is in the planning stages. Selected authors receive a plaque recognizing their achievements during the Business Meeting at the AFS Annual Meeting. The selected articles are published in Fisheries.

 

Committee composition: The award is administered by the AFS External Affairs Committee.

 

Duties: Selection of the award recipient; details determined by the AFS External Affairs

Committee.

 

Criteria:  The papers are judged according to their quality and their ability to turn a scientific research topic into a paper for the general public. Examples of past selected papers may be found in Fisheries.

 

 

 

William E. Ricker Resource Conservation Award

 

Background:  Established in 1995, this award is given annually, if warranted, to an individual or organization for singular accomplishments or long-term contributions that advance aquatic resource conservation (as opposed to the Sully award’s focus on fishery conservation) at a national or international level. Eligibility is not restricted to AFS members. The award consists

of a plaque.

 

Committee composition: This award is administered by the Past Presidents’ Advisory Council. The AFS Immediate Past-President serves as chair of the Council and all living past presidents are members of the Council.

 

Duties: Seeks nominations and selects the recipient of the award by fulfilling duties as described in the Awards Committee Section of the Procedures. The Council will review qualifications of

all nominees. A ballot will be provided to each council member to vote for one of three options for each nominee: 1) “yes, qualifies for the award”; 2) “no, not this year but retain in the pool for next two years”; or 3) “no, not qualified, remove from further consideration unless re-nominated in a future year.” Unsuccessful nominees from a given year will either be removed from the pool if deemed unqualified by a majority of voting Council members, or will remain in the pool and

be eligible for reconsideration for the two immediately following years. The recipient must receive affirmative votes from a majority of voting members.

 

Criteria:  Criteria are given above in the Background section. A nomination package should include a strong and detailed letter describing the nominee’s accomplishments and the evidence for being “significant at a national or international level.”  If the nomination is for an individual, include a CV if possible.  Nominations may be supported by multiple individuals by signing one nomination letter, or by submitting supporting letters in addition to the main nomination letter. Include the nominee’s title and full contact information (address, email, and phone).

 

OPERATIONAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

 

 

Activities that occur regularly in the Society have been standardized as fully as possible to ensure ease of performance and consistency of treatment and style.  Therefore, the Society has established a series of operational policies and procedures.  These are intended to help members, rather than to restrict them.  These procedures are always subject to revision, so members should check with the Executive Director before undertaking major projects and should offer AFS staff suggestions for improvements and updates to keep this manual consistent with current practice.

 

Developing and Advancing AFS Positions on Resource Issues

 

The Society promotes the conservation, development, and wise utilization of aquatic resources.  Organizational policies are developed by the membership to guide the executive staff and members on issues affecting aquatic resources, professional ethics, and the environment.  The membership is diverse in terms of geography, experience, and topics of environmental concern.  To properly represent and fully capture the broadest spectrum of knowledge, interest, and concern in such issues, it is important to involve every member, to the extent possible.

 

It is desirable to obtain full, careful, and continuing consideration of aquatic resource issues by all units.  The units should identify and elevate issues to higher levels within the Society for debate, screening, and possible development of formal policy statements.  A protocol is provided for unit involvement, to better enable the Society to identify issues worthy of policy guidance, and to identify informed members with specific capabilities to help the Society prepare scientifically defensible, objective, and technically accurate positions on specific issues.

 

Each Division, Chapter, and Section of the Society should adopt a mechanism through either standing committee, Executive Committee, or by other means whereby issues relating to aquatic resources, professional ethics, and the environment that are of importance to the unit’s members can be routinely identified.  The issues identified should be deemed of sufficient importance and scope as to warrant the development of a formal policy to provide political, social, and/or technical guidance to the staff and

membership of the Society.  Each issue, accompanied by a brief justification of need, and the names and addresses of unit members possessing the interest and knowledge to assist in the preparation of a policy statement should be forwarded to the Chair of the Society’s Resource Policy Committee (RPC).

 

Issues and support documentation are solicited at any juncture during the year.  The RPC Chair will evaluate the submitted materials and, if it is deemed necessary to judge the potential utility and value of specifically proposed policies, he or she will seek further justification including a study report from the sponsoring unit.  The ultimate decision of the RPC Chair relative to accepting, modifying, or rejecting suggested issue topics for development as formal policy statements will be forwarded to the sponsoring unit. Responsibilities for statement development (for those suggestions accepted) will proceed as outlined in the “Protocol for Establishing American Fisheries Society Policy Statements,” which is as follows.

 

Procedures for Developing and Advancing Resource Policy Statements

 

A. Purpose

 

AFS promotes the conservation and sustainability of fishery resources and aquatic ecosystems by advancing fisheries and aquatic science and promoting the development of fisheries professionals.  Organizational policies are developed by the membership to

guide the volunteer leadership, executive staff, units, and members on issues affecting aquatic resources, professional ethics, and the environment.  The membership is diverse in terms of geography, experience, and topics of environmental concern.  To properly represent and fully capture the broadest spectrum of knowledge, interest, and concern in such issues, it is important to involve a wide expertise to represent the membership diversity, to the extent possible.

 

B.  Selecting an Issue

 

Once a year, the Chair of the Resource Policy Committee (RPC) will advise all AFS units that proposals for new AFS policy statements should be referred to the Resource Policy Committee.

 

Any formal unit, informal group, or individual member of AFS, hereafter referred to as the sponsor, may propose an issue for study and development into a formal AFS policy statement.

 

An appropriate issue is defined as a matter of current or potential impact on fishery professionals, aquatic resources, or the environment, of which the political, social, and/or technical resolution is important to the AFS membership.  An AFS policy statement is defined as a published document, approved by AFS members, expressing an analysis of the science by the AFS and guidance on policy positions or a prescribed course of action as warranted.  A policy statement also includes a definition and general review of the issue, including the technical reasons for AFS concern.

 

It is desirable to obtain full, careful, and continuing consideration of aquatic resource issues by all AFS units.  Each AFS Division, Chapter, and Section should adopt a mechanism whereby issues relating to aquatic resources, professional ethics, and the environment that are of importance to the unit’s members can be routinely identified. The sponsor should identify and elevate issues to higher levels within AFS for debate,

screening, and possible development of formal policy statements.  A protocol is provided for unit involvement, to better enable AFS to identify issues worthy of policy guidance, and to identify informed members with specific capabilities to help AFS prepare scientifically defensible, objective, and technically accurate positions on specific issues.

 

Issues and support documentation may be solicited at any juncture during the year. Resource Policy Committee (RPC) will periodically query all AFS units regarding their policy development efforts to ensure efforts are not duplicated and to maximize coordination and efficiency of efforts on similar issues.

 

C. Proposing a Policy Issue

 

Once an issue is identified, the sponsor prepares a brief justification of need, and a list of the names and addresses of fishery professionals possessing the interest and knowledge to

 

assist in the preparation of a study report and policy statement.  These materials are forwarded to the Chair of the AFS Resource Policy Committee (RPC).  Newly adopted resolutions on appropriate issues should be referred to the RPC Chair for consideration as an AFS policy statement.  The ultimate decision of the RPC Chair relative to accepting, modifying, or rejecting suggested issue topics for development as formal policy statements will be forwarded to the sponsor.

 

D.  Review of Proposals

 

The RPC Chair will evaluate the appropriateness of proposed issues for development into formal AFS policy statements.  The Chair shall request comment on proposed issues from RPC members and from other AFS members knowledgeable about the issue.  Criteria for evaluation shall include, but need not be limited to, importance to the membership (e.g., recent AFS Resolutions on the issue), potential significance to aquatic resources, overlap with existing AFS policy statements, and present workload of the RPC.

 

After analysis of the proposed issue, the Chair shall make a recommendation to the AFS Governing Board and request direction. The Chair shall then provide the sponsor a decision on further action:

 

1.  On long-term issues for which formal AFS action is considered appropriate, development of an AFS policy statement will be initiated according to the protocol described herein.

 

2.  The RPC, the Governing Board, or both groups may deem a proposal inappropriate for development into an AFS policy statement.  Issues that appear to have value to an AFS unit may be directed to that unit for consideration.  For example, the proposal may be forwarded to the AFS Resolutions Committee for preparation into a Resolution.  The sponsor may appeal unaccepted proposals to the AFS President.  Additional materials or supporting rationale should be included with the appeal.  If the proposal is judged inappropriate by the RPC during the second review, it will not be reconsidered a third time until the next Governing Board meeting.

 

3.  Further information on, or evaluation of, a proposed issue may be required by the RPC Chair to evaluate adequately the need for, and kind of, AFS action.  For example, if the scope of the issue or adequacy of existing AFS policy guidance is unclear, the Chair may request that the sponsor prepare a study report.

 

E.  Study Reports

 

Study reports are intended to provide the basis for evaluating whether formal AFS policy should be developed on an issue, and also to provide a general outline of the intended action considered by the sponsor as appropriate for AFS.  Emphasis in study reports shall be on providing as much information as the RPC Chair deems necessary to determine whether a formal AFS policy is needed.  Hence, such information may be narrow or

broad in scope and may vary in detail.

 

Such reports shall be prepared by a work group formed by the President, in consultation with the RPC Chair and the sponsor.  The Chair may appoint a member of the RPC to represent the Chair on the work group. The Chair shall be responsible for ensuring that the work group includes AFS members knowledgeable on the issue.  Additional AFS

 

members may be requested by the sponsoring unit or the Chair to communicate their views on the issue to the work group and/or review and comment on work products.

 

F.  Drafting Policy Statements

 

If it is determined that a formal AFS policy statement should be prepared for an issue, then the President, in consultation with the RPC Chair and the sponsor, shall appoint a preparer or work group.  The Chair shall be responsible for ensuring that the work group includes AFS members knowledgeable on this issue.  The Chair may appoint a member of the RPC to oversee development of the policy statement to ensure that the statement is prepared and undergoes review according to RPC guidelines.  The RPC member will provide liaison between the Chair and work group during all phases of policy statement development.  If a study report was not required, the Chair may request that the sponsor provide a general outline of the proposed policy prior to establishing the formal work group (preparer).  This outline shall be used to assist the Chair in ensuring the work

group (preparer) adequately understands the process of developing the policy statement.

 

G.  Policy Statement Review

 

During preparation of the draft policy statement, the work group may solicit review of work products at its discretion or in consultation with the RPC liaison to the work group. A “final” draft will be submitted to the RPC Chair by the work group. The Chair shall review the “final” draft and solicit reviews and comments from members of the RPC, other knowledgeable members and all subunits likely to have an interest or expertise related to the subject.  Review should include, but need not be restricted to, technical, editorial, political (internal and external to AFS), social, and economic considerations. Deadlines for completion of reviews will be set by the Chair.

 

The Chair shall ensure that policy statements reflect the broad perspective of the AFS’s international make-up.  The Chair may return comments and reviews to the work group and request revision, or the Chair may revise the draft policy statement unilaterally using guidance provided by reviewers.  Revisions prepared by the work group or Chair should be provided to the sponsor for comment.

 

H. Policy Statement Approval

 

The RPC Chair shall provide recommendations for Governing Board action.  A majority of voting Governing Board members is required for approval to present the draft policy statement to the AFS membership for review and comment.

 

Final drafts approved by the RPC and Governing Board will be posted to the AFS website and notice sent to all members by electronic mail in addition to a notice being published in Fisheries, directing members to review the draft document on the AFS website and send comments to the AFS Executive Director.

 

Prior to posting, authorship of study reports and draft policy statements will be

determined by the Chair, in consultation with the President.  Authorship will be limited to individuals that contribute substantive, written text and all members of the RPC during

the year a policy is adopted. If an individual requests not to be listed as an author, that request should be honored.

 

After at least 60 days from posting, and based on member comments, the RPC Chair and Executive Director may elect to request revision to the statement.  The sponsor shall be advised of any revisions and provided opportunity for comment.

 

Following member input and appropriate revision, policy statements and a recommendation for action from the RPC Chair will be forwarded to the AFS Executive Director and Governing Board for consideration.  A majority approval by voting members of the Governing Board is required to bring the policy statement to the AFS

membership for a vote.  If approved, the policy will be voted on by the membership at the annual business meeting or by electronic means.  A majority approval by the voting members shall be required for adoption of the policy statement.

 

Policy statements not approved by the Governing Board may be revised by the RPC Chair, the work group, or the sponsor, published on the AFS website for review and comment, and resubmitted to the Governing Board.

 

All final policy statements will be footnoted to indicate that AFS policy statements reflect the position of the AFS as a whole, not of individual members or any other institution, organization or agency with which they are affiliated.

 

I. Policy Statement Distribution and Use

 

Newly adopted policy statements and study reports will be published in Fisheries and posted in the Resource Policy pages of the AFS Website, with the date of final acceptance and history of drafts.  An announcement will be posted on the home page highlighting the availability of a new policy statement.  The RPC Chair will provide newly adopted policy statements to all AFS unit heads.  The External Affairs Committee will ensure that all newly adopted policy statements are distributed to all interested entities.

 

J.  Policy Statement Expiration

 

Unless specified otherwise, all policy statements will be reconsidered by the RPC after five years to assure relevancy to current membership concerns. The RPC Chair shall submit recommendations for revision, continuance, or termination of policy statements to the Governing Board and Executive Director for review and approval.  If the Governing Board requests revision, the Chair may solicit comments from the RPC or other AFS members to determine the relevance of a policy statement or to obtain updated information.  The revision may be conducted by the original work group (preparer) or another group appointed for this purpose.  Revised policy statements will be published in on the AFS website and must be approved by the Governing Board and the membership as outlined above.  After 10 years, all policies must be re-approved by the Governing Board.  Policy statements may be rescinded by a majority vote of the Governing Board.

 

K.  Professional Responsibilities and Restrictions

 

AFS members are encouraged to participate in developing Society policy statements. AFS members have responsibility to provide accurate scientific knowledge and professional opinion within their fields of expertise to public and private policy makers and to the general public.

 

The American Fisheries Society holds federal tax exemptions for scientific and educational purposes.  Therefore, candidates for political office may not be endorsed by AFS or its units, and only a portion of AFS revenues, as specified by Title XIII of Public Law 94-455, can be used to influence federal legislation.  Special care must be taken to preserve the Society’s credibility and independence in the development and use of AFS policy statements.

 

Procedures for Submitting, Considering, and Implementing Resolutions

 

A resolution is a formal expression of AFS views.  The purpose of a resolution is to call attention to issues of concern and inform members of matters important to AFS. Resolutions by themselves do not solve problems; however, they place the AFS on record as recognizing the need for action by individual members, government agencies, appropriate legislative or administrative bodies, or by AFS officers.

 

Two types of resolutions may be considered.  INTERNAL RESOLUTIONS concern AFS itself by honoring the achievements of members, recognizing individuals or organizations that have assisted AFS in its work, or addressing AFS operations.  EXTERNAL RESOLUTIONS place AFS views on record regarding matters of significance affecting the fisheries resources of North America or the world.  The following considerations

apply mainly to general resolutions.

 

General External resolutions may be adopted at any organizational level of the Society. Resolutions should be identified clearly as actions of the respective organizational level. Chapters and Divisions usually adopt resolutions concerning local or regional fisheries issues while Sections adopt resolutions on issues pertinent to their area of interest.  It is the policy of AFS to adopt external resolutions only on important issues of broad national or international significance, where an expression of the views of the membership will be effective in accomplishing the desired action.  Regional or local resolutions may be judged as having national significance and be worthy of consideration by AFS so the Resolutions Committee must provide guidance in the format of the resolution and the procedure for advancing it for AFS consideration.

 

External resolutions should first be considered and adopted by Chapters, Sections, or Divisions so the broadest segment of the membership can participate in discussions and debates.  Resolutions should stand the debating process; however, there is often little opportunity for extended debate at the Annual Meeting of the AFS.

 

Chapters, Sections, or Divisions desiring Society action on a resolution must ensure that it carries national or international significance.  Resolutions should be submitted with background information necessary for the evaluation of accuracy and importance of the resolution.  The background information accompanying a resolution should include: contact information for those individuals involved in developing the resolution; a list of potential outside reviewers with their complete addresses, including those who are in favor of the resolution and those thought to be opposed to it;  and contact information, including email addresses, for all individuals who should receive a copy of the approved resolution.

 

Because resolutions become void when the issues they address become moot, it is imperative that the Unit desiring Society action inform the Resolutions Committee Chair of any action which may render the resolution moot.

 

External resolutions must undergo thorough and rigorous review in order to protect the credibility of AFS.  For this reason, a formal review system is recommended.  The Resolutions Committee will seek guidance from committees or units having responsibility for the general subject area with which the resolution is concerned.  Also,

 

individual members having expertise in the subject area will be included in the evaluation process.

 

External resolutions will be examined carefully; the relative merits and demerits will be discussed as well as the methods of implementing resolutions.

 

Upon approval by the Governing Board, resolutions will be posted to the AFS website and notice sent to all members by electronic mail in addition to a notice being published in Fisheries. When feasible, members will be given at least 30 days to review and comment on the document.

 

Final resolutions must be approved by the Governing Board prior to membership vote. Voting may take place electronically or at the Annual Business Meeting.

 

Because of the lack of opportunity for substantive analysis and debate, resolutions coming from the floor for consideration at the Annual Business Meeting are discouraged unless they are of an emergency nature.  The presiding officer may recognize a resolution coming from the floor, provided that it is written in the proper format and copies are available for distribution at the meeting.

 

Approved resolutions will be published in Fisheries and posted in a secure format on the

AFS website, as appropriate.

 

Approved resolutions will be electronically distributed by AFS staff to the list of individuals named in the background information.

 

 

 

Society Advocacy and Unit Procedures

 

Sharing science-based information with the public is a key AFS value.  There are a number of means of sharing information including publication in AFS journals, other scientific publications, workshops, continuing education courses, unit newsletters, resolutions, policy statements, and periodic communications such as letters, action alerts, and media releases.

 

Units should adopt internal procedures to manage development of positions in support of advocacy actions which are suitable for their unit.  The following advocacy guidance (modeled after guidance developed by the Idaho Chapter and the Western Division) provide a good model.

 

“A unit may hold meetings, sponsor symposia, disseminate information, adopt resolutions, and engage in other activities that advance Society objectives and conform to the Society’s Constitution, Rules, and Procedures.  Actions and resolutions of a unit shall be identified only with that unit unless formally adopted by the Society or another unit.” (AFS Constitution Article V #5).

 

A.  AFS Advocacy Guidance

 

Issue Selection Criteria

 

1.  Is the issue pertinent to AFS goals?

 

2.  Will involvement of AFS make a difference?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Steps


3.  Is there membership support?

 

4.  Does AFS have the best available technical information?

 

5.  Have minority opinions been solicited and presented?

 

6.  Does the urgency of the issue warrant action without full membership approval?

 

7.  Is AFS willing to follow through?

 

8.  Do the geographic boundaries and other aspects of the issue make it appropriate for AFS action?

 

 

 

1.  Member, committee, or unit raises concern/issue

 

2.  Unit or committee reviews and recommends action to AFS Governing

Board or Executive Director and Officers

 

3.  AFS Governing Board or Executive Director and Officers reviews appropriate action relative to criteria.  The Governing Board will review the issue if at all possible.  In some situations where it is a rapidly developing policy issue that cannot wait for Governing Board action the Executive Director and Officers may review the proposed action relative to the criteria.  In those instances they will notify the Governing Board of the decision and rationale.  Regardless of who reviews the issue they should ultimately:

 

a.  refer to committee for more information, or b.  solicit wider review of membership, or

c.  take action

 

 

Possible Actions

 

1.  Sends letter requesting action or providing comments

 

2.  Drafts resolution

 

3.  Drafts policy statement

 

4.  Recommends educational forum

 

5.  Denies action with justification

 

6.  Litigation

 

B.  Coordinating Unit Advocacy with AFS

 

As a unit is preparing a draft policy statement or a draft resolution, a plan to share it with other units and other fisheries-related groups should be developed.  For example, in 1992, while the Humboldt Chapter was preparing its position paper, “California Salmonid Stocks at Risk,” the following steps were taken:  a news release was prepared and distributed; Chapter members were advised of the release date via the newsletter; Chapter members were asked to be on the outlook for misinformation in the media and to respond

 

with letters to the editor; the Western Division and Chapters in the Division were contacted to assure coordination; and AFS Headquarters was contacted so the information could be shared with national media contacts, foundations, and Washington- based fisheries conservation groups in a timely fashion.

 

Ultimately, unit positions are sanctioned by AFS and subject to change by decision of the

Governing Board if they are not in keeping with the overall goals of the AFS.

 

Lobbying Information and Guidelines

 

As a result of AFS’s tax-exempt status, AFS must follow certain guidelines set forth by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).  We may provide expert testimony in administrative and legislative hearings; write letters, make telephone calls and visit our legislators to discuss issues for which we can provide science-based information; we can share our information with the public at large and urge that action be taken; and we can lobby for sound fisheries legislation.  UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCE can AFS or any of its units be involved in partisan political campaigns.  This means neither AFS as a whole, nor one of its units, nor a member using their AFS affiliation, can endorse a political candidate.

 

Much of what was once considered lobbying is now considered information sharing under the August 31, 1990 U.S. IRS regulations.  For example:

 

*Urging Congress to develop legislation to better manage large interjurisdictional rivers is not lobbying…. however, urging a single Congressional representative to support HR 1234 or any specific legislation is lobbying.

 

*Generally, communicating with a judicial, executive, or administrative body is not considered lobbying.

 

AFS declares its lobbying expenditures each year when filing its income tax form.  Both direct lobbying and grassroots lobbying are permitted, but they have different financial limits.  Direct lobbying occurs anytime AFS petitions a legislator for action.  Grassroots lobbying occurs when an AFS member asks nonmembers to contact their legislators. With an annual budget of about two million dollars, AFS is permitted to spend a total of

$250,000 on lobbying, of which $62,500 can be grassroots lobbying.  This generous lobbying limit exceeds future foreseeable expenditures.  The limit is high because the IRS expects public non-profit organizations like AFS to speak out on topics where they have expertise and strong commitment.

 

Ideally, AFS would lobby on issues where the Society has developed policy or position statements, or resolutions, but because of time constraints, that is not always possible.  Be sure that whichever avenue is followed (direct or grassroots lobbying), the concurrence of the appropriate unit is obtained.  Notify related units, the AFS Executive Director and the AFS President of the planned lobbying actions to ensure coordination.  As long as you proceed in a professional manner with science-based information your views will be helpful to your audience.

 

Each unit President or their designee must provide the AFS Executive Director with a copy of lobbying materials and an estimate of the costs incurred during the past calendar year by January 30th of each year.  When in doubt as to whether a project is lobbying or not, the project should be forwarded to AFS Headquarters. The AFS staff, in consultation with the AFS tax advisor, can make the determination of the project’s status.

 

Publications Policies

 

A.  Comprehensive Publications Policy

 

The following is a comprehensive AFS publications policy, first adopted in 1987 and later modified according to current practice and to the strategic plans of the Publications Overview Committee. (See also,  www.fisheries.org under Publications.)

 

1.0  Scope and Application of the Policy

 

1.1  The following policy applies to all scientific publications issued by or on behalf of AFS or its units, i.e., those scientific and technical publications bearing the AFS logo or which otherwise can be identified as being sponsored by the Society or any of its units.

 

1.2  Exceptions:  This policy does not apply to directories, bibliographies and other information or library aids, to routine membership communications (e.g., newsletters) of the Society or any unit, or to such periodic reports by units or by standing or special committees as may be required by the Governing Board or by the Executive Committee of any Division.

 

2.0  Editorial Control and Authority

 

2.1  The Executive Director is responsible for Fisheries with respect to the appointment of editors, editorial policy, and content.

 

2.12  The Executive Director and the Director of Publications are responsible for all other publications of the Society to the extent defined in the following sections of this policy.

 

2.12.1  For Journals of the Society, the Director of Publications and the Journal Managing Editor appoints editors for specific journals and oversees and approves the development and implementation of editorial policy and quality control.

 

2.12.2  For unit publications, the Director of Publications reviews and approves the publication proposal with regard to editorial policy and standards and quality control.  The Director of Publications, at the request of the sponsoring unit, may also provide the necessary advice and assistance regarding scheduling, format, and printing.

 

2.12.3  In arriving at a decision to approve book publication, the Director of Publications consults with the Executive Director and the Book Advisory Committee.

 

2.12.4  In disapproving a book publication proposal, the Director of Publications will present the reasons for such action, and will provide, if appropriate, advice on the procedures or actions necessary to merit approval.

 

2.12.5  Appeal of an adverse decision regarding a book may be made to the Governing Board, who may seek additional review and

 

recommendations from the Executive Director, Book Advisory Committee and the POC.

 

2.12.6  For all such book publications, one copy of the final product must be provided to the Executive Director and to the Director of Publications.

 

3.0  Control and Review of Quality and Standards

 

3.1  The Director of Publications, Journal Managing Editor, editors, and associate editors are responsible for establishing and maintaining high levels of quality with respect to scientific content and effective communication in the publication or publications under their control.

 

3.2 For Fisheries, a Chief Science Editor will oversee the science content of the journalSpecifically, the Chief Science Editor will:

1.   Select the Science Editors for the scientific papers submitted to Fisheries.

2.   Make final decisions about accepting or rejecting scientific papers, based on reviews orchestrated by the Science Editors of Fisheries.

3.   Ensure the scientific veracity of the each issue of Fisheries, by perusing

the entire issue for scientific content prior to publication, including science papers, student angles, case studies, and letters to the editor, while the Managing Editor continues to solicit and edit the magazine content such as features, columns, etc.

4.   Help select Science Editors according to POC procedures for the recruitment, review, and retention of AFS journal editors.

5.   Solicit broad general submissions of general interest to the diverse membership of AFS.

6.   Solicit cutting-edge submissions from world leaders in fisheries science.

7.   Mentor and provide guidance to the Science Editors, including acting as vice-chair of their editorial meeting at the AFS Annual Meeting

8.   Attend the meetings of the AFS Journals Editorial Board

9.   Interact with the Managing Editor for Fisheries and Director of Publications.  This includes discussions on the production of the journal, updating instructions to authors, time to publication of issues, and providing feedback related to content, themes, and direction of the scientific and magazine aspects of Fisheries.

 

3.3 All prospective technical contributions to journals or to other volumes will be peer-reviewed.

 

3.32.1  Peer review usually will be conducted by two reviewers, acting independently.

 

3.2.2  For Fisheries, the same policy applies to contributed articles; the Executive Director may waive the peer-review requirement for invited papers or opinion papers.

 

3.43  Reviewers will have their anonymity protected, unless they specifically indicate otherwise.

 

3.54  Reviewers shall not communicate with the authors of manuscripts under

their review except through, or with permission of, the editor, until the manuscript has been accepted for publication.

 

3.65  Reviewers shall not keep, copy, or distribute manuscripts sent to them for evaluation.

 

3.76  The POC will perform periodic reviews of the content, quality, and editorial standards of AFS publications, and will report its findings and recommendations to the Executive Director.

 

3.76.1  The Executive Director may request review by POC of specific publications.

 

4.0  Publication Ethics

 

4.1  Authors are expected to maintain high ethical standards with respect to extending appropriate credit and recognition to their colleagues and fellow contributors.

 

4.2  Dual publication, i.e., the replicate publication of the same data or information, is not allowed.  A full discussion of this issue is found in Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 110:573-574, 1981; the policy enunciated in the referenced editorial is hereby extended to all AFS publications.

 

4.2.1  Authors of manuscripts must state that ideas, data, and conclusions purported therein to be original are neither under simultaneous consideration by another publisher or for another Society publication, nor previously published.

 

4.2.2  All papers – whether published, in press, or under editorial review – that are closely related to the manuscript being submitted, must be documented in the manuscript or in correspondence to the editor.  Reprints or preprints must be made available on request of the editor.

 

4.2.3  Qualifications and exceptions to this policy are given in TAFS

110:573-574, 1981.

 

5.0  New Publications and Publication Services

 

5.1  The Society will develop new publications as needs and opportunities occur. Expansion of the existing list of publications may occur as the result of development of a new publication series, assuming control of existing publications through contractual or other agreements, or by providing other information-transfer or information retrieval services.

 

5.2  All proposals for new journals must be approved by the Governing Board, following recommendation by the Executive Director and consultation with the POC.

 

5.2.1  In specific instances, or for specific types of publications, the

Governing Board may delegate this authority to the Executive Director.

 

5.3  For all such publications, the policies stated herein will apply.

 

5.4  The Executive Director is authorized to act for the Governing Board in matters pertaining to translations of AFS publications to other languages, and obtaining translations into English of appropriate writings in other languages.

 

B.  Publications Policy-Symposium Series

 

(Based on policies approved in 1986).

 

1.  To qualify as a volume in the symposium series, the proposed publication must consist of a set of previously unpublished, thematically related contributions in

one of the fields of fisheries as defined in the “Guide for Authors” of Transactions of the American Fisheries Society, North American Journal of Fisheries Management, North American Journal of Aquaculture, or Journal of Aquatic Animal Health.  The contributions should be the result of a symposium,

workshop, or conference.

 

2.  The volume may be published as either a special feature in a journal or as a stand-alone book publication. In some cases, the proceedings may be published as a special feature in a journal issue and then subsequently as a reprint book

volume.  A decision between these two alternatives lies with the Director of

Publications and is based on the potential market and merit of the proceedings.

 

3.  The proposal to the Journal Managing Editor (if for a journal), or the Director of Publications (if for a book) for inclusion in the symposium series must include:

 

a.  a rigorous statement of the symposium’s purpose and scope;

 

b.  identification of an editor, with a statement of the editor’s commitment

to the project;

 

c.  a statement of editorial procedures and standards to be applied;

 

d.  a schedule for review and final manuscript submittal;

 

e.  assurance that the material will be sufficient for a substantial publication.

 

Whenever possible, the proposal should be presented prior to the symposium, conference, or workshop.

 

4.  The Executive Director and Director of Publications have final responsibility and authority for accepting or rejecting a proceedings proposal.  Appeal of an adverse decision on proposal acceptance may be made to the Executive Director, POC, and then, possibly, to the Governing Board.

 

5.  Responsibilities of the Journal Managing Editor and Director of Publications are to:

 

a.  review the proposal and to correspond with the Symposium Committee or editor regarding editorial standards, page charges, and schedules;

 

b.  exert quality control by performing a substantive review of manuscripts before they are returned to authors;

 

6.  Responsibilities of the Symposium Committee or sponsors are to:

 

a.  develop the proposal in accordance with above;

 

b.  maintain the review schedule;

 

c.  provide for all peer reviews; and

 

d.  maintain AFS standards regarding technical quality control, format, and bibliographic control.

 

7.  In the case of symposium projects sponsored by AFS units and published as books, net profits from the sale of symposium volumes will be divided equally between Society (50%) and the sponsoring unit(s) (50%).  Exceptions to this policy may be negotiated with the Director of Publications and Executive Director.

 

C. Recruitment, Review, and Retention of Editors

 

1.0  Recruitment of Editors

 

1.1  Existing editorial board members will actively recruit successful Associate Editors that have expressed an interest in serving as an Editor or that might be willing to consider serving.

 

1.2  To ensure that there is an opportunity for open recruiting, an advertisement will be placed in Fisheries and communicated through other AFS journals and AFS email distribution lists. The text of that advertisement will be discussed among the Selection Committee (see below), but should contain language similar to:

 

AFS seeks dynamic scientists with the broad perspective on fisheries and high editorial standards to serve as editors of (name of journal). AFS seeks editors who must be committed to fastpaced deadlines

and would be appointed for five year terms. Duties include:

 

1. Deciding on the suitability of contributed items and advising authors on what is needed to make contributions publishable, using the advice of the editorial advisory board and outside reviewers. Editors review material for scientific accuracy as well as for clarity, readability, and interest in the broad fisheries community.

 

2. Soliciting manuscripts to ensure broad coverage.

 

3. Setting the editorial standards for (name of journal) in keeping with the objectives of the publication in accordance with the policies and guidance provided by the Publications Overview Committee and editorial board of the Journal.

 

4. Making recommendations to enhance the vitality of the Journal.

 

To be considered for one of the editor positions send your curriculum vitae with a letter of interest explaining why you want to be the Journal editor via email to (appropriate contact information). To

nominate a highly qualified colleague, send a letter of recommendation to the same email address.

 

1.2.1  When appropriate the announcement should specify the sub‐discipline or focus area (e.g.,marine fisheries, inland fisheries, genetics, etc.) of the new editor.

 

1.3.  The AFS Publications Director or AFS Lead Technical Editor will contact nominated candidates to determine their willingness to serve.

 

1.4.  A Selection Committee will be formed to review candidates. Committee makeup should be the AFS Publications Director (Chair), the current editors for the journal in need of a new editor, and the current chair of the Publications Overview Committee. The Selection Committee will choose a new editor recognizing that interpersonal communication skills and editorial experience are as valuable as a long publication record.

 

2.0 Recruitment of Associate Editors

 

2.1  When an AFS journal needs to replace an Associate Editor, potential candidates should be identified via nominations by the retiring AE, existing AEs and Editors (with those nominations based primarily on a history of quality of reviews provided by candidates), the AFS Publications Director and Lead Technical Editor, and names that have come through the AFS committee volunteer call that is published prior to each annual meeting. In addition, an annual announcement will be included in the June or July issue of Fisheries soliciting interested candidates. Selection of a new AE from that pool of candidates will be done by journal editors (with each editor for a particular journal voting on the potential replacement) in conjunction with the AFS Publications Director and the AFS Lead Technical Editor.

 

3.0 Review and Retention of Editors

 

3.1  All AFS journal editors will meet with the Publications Director each year (preferably at the annual meeting, but phone interviews may be required when meeting attendance is not possible) to discuss work over the previous year. Discussion topics may include major changes in submissions to the journal, rates of acceptance or rejection, times manuscripts spend in review, and comments (if any) from authors or associate editors.

 

3.2  Every five years, the Publications Director should review each journal editor with the explicit goal of making sure that the editor’s performance continues to serve the society well. Issues for discussion may include any concerns that authors or associate editors have raised, the time that

 

manuscripts are on the editor’s desk, and any sudden shifts in acceptance or rejection rates or any significant departures from rates of the other editors of the same journal. If no concerns arise, the editor will be appointed for another five year term. If concerns are raised they should be discussed at this time, and if the AFS Publications Director feels that the problems are too large for the editor to continue, the editor will not be invited back for another term.

 

Continuing Education Courses

 

One of the most important functions of the Society is the maintenance and enhancement of the technical, professional, and administrative knowledge and skills of its members. The AFS Continuing Education Committee (CEC) is charged with that task, and encourages individuals, Chapters, Sections, Divisions and other subunits to develop and propose continuing education activities. These may be approved for Continuing Education Units (CEUs), which are tracked for participants by the American Council on Education (ACE) through a transcription service.  The designation of CEUs ensures a consistent awarding of credit.

 

 

The AFS Continuing Education Committee is responsible for ensuring the quality of AFS CE offerings; thus all courses or activities conducted at Society-level events must be approved by the Committee.   In addition, all courses seeking to award AFS CEUs must be approved by the CEC.

 

 

The AFS Continuing Education Committee is responsible for ensuring the quality of AFS CE offerings; thus all courses or activities sponsored by the Society must be approved by the Committee.  The Committee will review courses sponsored by Sections, Divisions, Chapters or Student Subunits at the request of the Unit.  In addition, all courses that

award AFS CEUs must be approved.

 

 

To obtain approval for a proposed activity, proponents must complete a Course Approval Form, available on the AFS website at  www.fisheries.org or from the Units Coordinator at the AFS Headquarters Office.  Completed forms should be submitted at least 2 months prior to proposed date for the activity to the Units Coordinator or CE Chair.  Forms are sent to the committee for review.  A decision to approve/disapprove along with any recommendations to improve the course and designation of CEUs (if any) is sent to the course contact, usually within three to four weeks.

 

 

When a course has been approved, the Units Coordinator sends the instructor/course contact the forms students must complete to obtain CEU credit. These must be filled out during the CE activity. Course contacts must also collect a CEU registration fee for each student who wants to receive CEUs. The fee is $7.00 per AFS member and $10.00 per nonmember.  Completed forms and one check covering all registration fees must be sent to the Unit Services Coordinator by the course contact after completion of the activity. Course participants who are receiving academic credit are not eligible for CEU credit.

 

Topic-Oriented Meetings (TOMs)

 

Purpose

 

Topic-oriented meetings (TOMs) are specialized meetings that focus on a particular topic of interest to AFS members. They are held periodically in addition to the AFS annual meeting and are typically much smaller in size. They are not meant to replace similar meetings that are sponsored by various AFS units, but in contrast to those meetings are sponsored by the Society, frequently in collaboration with AFS units or external organizations. TOMs serve to advance the AFS Strategic Plan goals of information transfer and outreach, aquatic stewardship, and member services. They help to advance AFS Strategic Plan strategies of increasing visibility, enhancing collaboration with other organizations, providing services for professional development, and providing scientific and technical information.

 

Organizing a TOM

 

A TOM may be organized by an AFS unit or by individual AFS members. The organizers will identify the focus of the proposed TOM and prepare a statement of topics to be addressed. This statement becomes the body of the proposal, which is submitted to the AFS Meetings Oversight Committee for review. The organizers will identify a program committee and work with that committee to establish potential participants, time, meeting location, sponsorship, financial responsibility, and the program plan.

 

Proposal Submission

 

Organizers should submit a proposal with the following sections to the AFS Meetings

 

Oversight Committee:

 

  • A list of organizers and program committee members.

 

  • Discussion of the scientific focus of the conference, topics of proposed sessions, objectives and goals.

 

  • Suggested dates and duration of conference.

 

  • Suggested sites (if the organizers have a preference) and reason for choice.

 

  • Co-sponsors, if any, and their role (financial or non-financial support) in the conference.

 

  • Outline of format and schedule (invited speakers, appropriate number of contributed papers, posters, and time available for discussion).

 

  • Fields of interest, possible participants, a preliminary list of key speakers and possible guests from other societies or abroad.

 

  • A preliminary budget including anticipated income and expenses.
    • Anticipated number of participants and the size of the community from which attendance will be drawn.

 

 

  • Previous or upcoming conferences that will be held on same or similar topics. If within past two years, justification for holding another conference.

 

  • Anticipated conference reports and/or publications.

 

  • Field trip description, if there is going to be one.

 

  • Biography of organizers, including a list of recent publications.

 

Sponsorship and Financial Responsibility

 

TOMs should be a self-supporting program within AFS. AFS will help organizers to identify potential financial sponsors. The AFS will be the principal sponsor of TOMs.

 

For conferences held outside the U.S., a local fisheries equivalent organization should be asked to consider sponsorship to avoid the appearance of unilateral action on another’s turf. This sponsorship may be in-kind as well as financial assistance.

 

Once the proposal is approved by the Meetings Oversight Committee, the organizers will work with AFS to determine an appropriate funding strategy for the conference.

 

The preliminary budget will detail who (AFS or the organizers) is responsible for deficits or excesses, how the conference fees will be set, and who will submit a financial statement to AFS at the conclusion of the conference. When a conference is held outside North America, the host organization will usually handle logistics for the conference and therefore will control the finances. In such cases, the host organization is generally asked to accept financial responsibility for the conference, relieving the organizers of this responsibility. AFS staff will prepare a letter of agreement for these cases.

 

Program and Abstracts

 

If necessary, AFS will assist with the abstracts via online submission and make the abstract database available to the organizers. The organizers and program committee arrange the program and provide the program copy to AFS. The program is for attendees only and is not given or sold to others. The program, with abstracts, is also put on the AFS Web Site.

 

Publicity

 

The conference organizers should prepare announcements and pre-conference publicity to be published in Fisheries and other appropriate outlets, including the AFS website.

 

AFS staff will edit the final copy for publicity pieces. The organizers may provide AFS with a select mailing list of potential participants. Registration and housing information is sent to all who contribute to the conference program or express an interest in attending.

 

Publication

 

The information presented at some TOMs should lend itself to publication, thus the conference organizers should consider carefully the question of publication. All publication proposals are subject to review by the appropriate publication board or editor. AFS has the right of first refusal to publish a product before the organizers can go to a

non-AFS product/publisher.

 

Topic Oriented Hill Seminars

 

 

Purpose:

 

The American Fisheries Society (AFS) is the oldest and most prestigious fisheries professional society in the world. Founded in 1870, AFS now has more than 9,000 members with expertise in all areas of fisheries science and management.

 

The mission of AFS is: a) to promote the conservation, development, and wise use of fisheries; b) further the professional development of its members; and c) to gather and disseminate scientific, technical information about fisheries science and practice through publications, meetings, and other forms of communication to members and the general public. Relying heavily on thorough peer review, AFS has become the preeminent voice of fisheries science, and has therefore become a most trusted voice for communicating that science.

 

AFS proposes to facilitate a series of seminars which will be open to all scientific views and will be designed to further educate the general public, congressional staff and governmental agencies about a wide variety of fisheries related issues. Topics may be proposed by federal agencies or congressional staffers for consideration by AFS.

 

However, the Society will act as the facilitator of these seminars in order to provide an impartial forum for communicating the latest developments on key fisheries issues. Having AFS select speakers and provide the means of communicating the science will assure impartiality and objectivity, especially in the often contentious debates related to the management of fishery resources.

 

Format:

 

Quarterly to biannual seminars on Capitol Hill (during lunch hour or afternoon) to focus on current issues in fisheries and other aquatic resources. The seminars would be delivered using the following format:

 

 

  • One moderator to officiate each seminar. The moderator will open and close the seminar, introduce speakers, and moderate the question and answer session.
  • Each seminar will include presentations from 2-3 speakers. Each presentation will be 10-

20 minutes in length and will focus on the theme of the seminar.

  • After the conclusion of the presentations, the floor will be opened for a question and answer period lasting no more than 20 minutes.

 

Initial List of Suggested Topics:

 

  • Ocean Acidification
  • Marine Aquaculture
  • West Coast Salmon Runs
  • Invasive Species
  • International Fisheries Management and Conservation
  • Diverse Human Interfaces with Fisheries

 

 

Potential collaborators, including related professional societies such as:

 

  • ASLO
  • The Wildlife Society
  • ERF
  • Ecological Society of America

 

Potential contributors, including state and federal agencies such as:

  • US Fish and Wildlife Service
  • US Forest Service
  • NOAA
  • USGS

 

Location:

 

Each seminar will be held in a designated congressional office building depending on availability.

 

Meeting Support

 

1. AFS is a scientific society that regularly seeks funding for its annual meetings from agencies, foundations and other entities. As such, it is not able to provide monetary contributions to support meetings of other scientific organizations.  AFS participation at such meetings may be provided, however, through AFS presence at trade shows as well as through contributions of books, posters, and other products for sale or distribution at the meetings.

 

2. AFS may provide monetary contributions to support the meetings of AFS Units, but those contributions will normally be limited to providing seed money that will be returned to AFS from the revenue of the meeting.   In addition, AFS may provide support to AFS Unit meetings through participation at trade shows as well as through contributions of books, posters, and other products for sale or distribution at the meetings.

 

Procedures for Implementing this Policy:

 

1.  Monies will not be allocated for financial support of non-AFS meetings.  Allocations of seed money to support AFS Unit meetings (money to be returned to AFS will be subject to the normal dollar-value reviews whereby the Executive Director and Officers may approve expenditures up to $5,000; the Management Committee approves requests for expenditures from that level up to $10,000; and Governing Board approval is required for larger requests.

 

2. All organizations or Units requesting seed money to support meetings should submit formal requests electronically to the AFS Executive Director.  This requirement includes requests from both non-AFS and AFS Units for AFS participation at trade shows, etc., and requests from AFS Units seeking seed money support for meetings.  All requests should provide details about the meeting purpose, dates, venue, and type of assistance requested from AFS.  Non-AFS organizations should also provide information to address the criteria noted in #4 below.  All requests submitted to the AFS Executive Director will be discussed with the AFS Officers, who together with the Executive Director will make

a decision.  When seed monies in excess of $5,000 are requested, the decision will be made at the appropriate level (either Management Committee or Governing Board.  The Executive Director will communicate the decision to the requesting Unit or non-AFS organization.

 

3. Decisions to provide active AFS participation at meetings (e.g., at trade shows will, in general, place priority on requests from AFS Units over requests from non-AFS organizations.   The Executive Director may make exceptions.

 

 

4. Criteria that will be considered in providing an AFS presence at non-AFS meetings will include:

 

a. Close tie-in to AFS mission.

b. Must have possible long-term returns to the AFS in terms of membership growth, publication sales, and other tangibles.

 

c. Must encourage reciprocity with AFS meetings (i.e., show willingness to consider a reciprocal contribution to AFS meetings.

d. Other criteria as deemed appropriate by the Executive Director and officers.

 

PROGRAM PLANNING AND FINANCIAL PLANNING

 

 

A.  Definitions

 

1.  Reserve Fund – The goal here is for AFS to have a contingency Reserve Fund equal to one-year operational budget, as defined by the average of the last three years.  This Reserve Fund shall be composed of liquid funds to cover the evolving needs of the Society and invested funds to provide growth of the overall fund.

 

2.  Overhead Rate – The annually calculated rate, approved by the U.S. Government, used to estimate the value of Headquarters administration costs.  In fiscal year 2004, the approved AFS overhead rate was 33.07% of direct costs. (Exceptions to this rate may be granted through negotiations and must be approved by the Executive Director.)

 

3. Special Projects – Refers to any new project not already approved within the

Operational Budget.

 

B.  Financial Policies

 

1.  Operational Budget

 

The policy of the American Fisheries Society (AFS) is to maintain a balanced calendar-year operational budget as a minimum. Preferably however, each year there will be a contribution to the Reserve Fund.  This budget is presented to the Governing Board for approval at its meeting during the preceding year’s Annual Meeting.  Modifications to this budget, based on more recent data, may be presented to the Midyear Governing Board for approval.  In addition, during the Midyear meeting, the Governing Board approves any changes to the membership dues and prices of major products and services.

 

In principle, the cost of AFS products and services should be covered by the revenues accrued from these products and services.

 

2.  Special Projects

 

Support for short-term projects, outside the general operational budget, can be sought provided the following guidelines are observed:

 

a.  Special projects must contribute to achievement of the Society’s major

goals.

 

b.  The Society will charge an overhead rate covering Headquarters costs to all funding proposals except where the granting entity has an explicit policy to prohibit it (in which case we will assess whether direct administrative costs can be included or if the Society wishes to absorb these costs).

 

c.  Special funding can be sought both to expand current approved activities and to initiate new approved activities.  Pass-through projects handled on behalf of AFS units or external parties shall include at least Society administrative costs, i.e., an agreed-upon overhead cost.

 

d.  Any single project, with projected expenses in excess of $100,000 must have Governing Board approval.  No project should be undertaken until a business plan is approved by the Executive Director and the Governing Board.

 

e.  The Executive Director, in concert with the leadership of the committee of reference, may establish a special project, so long as the above guidelines are followed.

 

f.  There will be at least an annual update on special project finances.  This will be part of the Executive Director’s report to the Management (and Budget) Committee.

 

3.  AFS Meetings and Symposia (See also the AFS Meetings Manual)

 

The following principles will help ensure successful meeting planning:

 

a.  Bids to host a meeting are submitted in a competing environment. Hosts may be AFS Chapters, other Society units, or provincial/state agencies.

 

b.  The Society normally advances funds to the host organization (Local

Arrangements Committee) for meeting planning.

 

c.  Costs of a host planning team attending a previous year’s meeting may be paid from meeting revenues–advanced by the Society–if there is no other way for them to attend.

 

d.  The return to the Annual Meeting budget of net trade show from that meeting will be 20% of the net.

e.  At a minimum, the AFS Annual Meeting must break even or better. f.  Complimentary rooms provided by hotels, if any, are used by

Headquarters and host equally.

 

g.  In the event that a unit forgoes a regularly scheduled meeting to host an AFS Annual Meeting, 10% of net revenues will go to the host.  Other units (such as a Division) that choose to co-locate their meeting with the AFS Annual Meeting, may also receive 10% of the net (or some similar amount negotiated and agreed upon in writing).  The rest of the net revenue goes

to the Society.  AFS, at its own choosing, may require an audit of annual meeting income and expense.

 

j.  Because the Society assumes financial liability for its meetings, the Executive Director must approve the meeting’s budget before presentation to the Governing Board for final approval.  Once a budget is thus approved, any significant expenditures beyond what is already approved must gain the approval of the Executive Director.

 

4.  Fiscal Relationships with Units

 

Because the Society is legally responsible for unit obligations, the following policies apply:

 

a.  Unit secretary-treasurers shall send minutes, including member-audited financial reports, to the Executive Director within 30 days after the unit’s annual business meeting.

 

b.  In the unlikely event of Society insolvency, unit assets may be called on to satisfy obligations.

 

c.  Units with a three-year average annual gross income exceeding

$25,000 are required to file an IRS return (form 990) with a copy to the

Society’s Director of Finance and Administration.

 

d.  Checks issued by the Society should be cashed as soon as possible. After 12 months the Society will send a reminder to cash the outstanding check.  If after 18 months the check is not cashed, the Society will inform the recipient that it has stopped payment and the Society will send a check in that amount to the Division, in the case of a divisional entity, or will return that amount to the Society treasury if it is not issued to a divisional entity.

 

5.  Reserve Fund and Dedicated Funds:

 

These funds are managed separately from general operational and special project budgets.

 

a.  In 2004, a Reserve Fund policy was set to have a goal of one-year operational budget (using the previous 3 years average).

 

b.  In 1988, A Publications Endowment Fund was established by a fee of $2.00 per book sold. The purpose of this fund is to support the publication of Society and unit publications for which outside support is not available.

 

c.  The J. Frances Allen Scholarship Fund is a dedicated fund created for the purpose of providing at least one $2,500 scholarship annually to a deserving woman doctoral candidate.  The fund balance is currently sufficient to achieve this objective without invading the principal.

 

d.  The Skinner Memorial Fund is a dedicated fund created for the purpose of providing travel scholarships for students to come to the AFS Annual Meeting.  The fund currently supports travel without invasion of the principal.

 

e.  The Snieszko Fund is a dedicated fund created in 1988 with funds from a bequest from Stanislaus and Julia Snieszko for the benefit of the AFS Fish Health Section.

 

f.  The Carl R. Sullivan Fisheries Conservation Award Endowment is a dedicated fund created in 1991 to support the annual purchase of the “Sully” award.  The interest may be expended for the award but the principal may not be invaded.

 

g.  The Carl R. Sullivan Memorial Endowment is a dedicated fund to support AFS membership dues for non-North American fisheries

 

scientists.  Providing funding is adequate, each “scholarship” member is to receive an AFS peer-reviewed journal of choice.

 

C.  Possible Financial Pitfalls

 

When you plan special projects, it is useful to state potential pitfalls,

 

1.  New Missions.  The Society must hold completely to its defined mission and objectives in order to preserve and enhance its impact.  The more effective the Society becomes, the more tempting it will be for members to try to use the organization and its influence for their own purposes, drawing it into issues, battles, and projects that do not contribute to achievement of the mission.

 

2.   Overex tension  (“Mi ssi on  creep ”)  .  Attempting to respond to the never-ending list of important activities that do fall within our mission is also a potential pitfall. Even if we can avoid becoming involved in the individual priorities represented

by our units and members, we could still get into serious trouble by trying to respond to all the appropriate ideas that alert members and others will urge on us.

 

3.  Fragmentation.  In addition to getting ourselves badly overextended, we could be inclined to try to do so many different things at once that we will not do any of them well, will lack focus, and will have limited capacity to accomplish the big things.

 

Finally, over caution in avoiding pitfalls could lead to lack of action and failure to realize opportunities.

 

(from a 1992  Executive Committee report)

 

 

 

Investment Objectives and Guidelines

 

Introduction

 

These Statements of Investment Policies and Objectives set forth AFS’s plan for effectively managing and controlling the Society’s investments and fixed assets. For policy purposes, these tangible assets are divided into three categories: Long-Term Investments, Short-Term Money, and Fixed Assets for each of which there is a separate statement.

 

The statements attempt (1) to identify appropriate risk postures, (2) to state the expectations and objectives for all categories of assets, (3) provide asset allocation guidelines that are consistent with the risks and the objectives, and (4) establish criteria for monitoring and evaluating the performance results of the investment.

 

Statement of Investment Policy and Objectives: Long-Term Investments

 

This Statement of Investment Policy and Objectives governs the management of the American Fishery Society’s investment assets categorized as Long-Term Investments. The investments in this category include both Donor Restricted Funds and Governing-Board Designated Reserves and other funds. This Statement shall remain in effect until modified as conditions warrant by the Governing Board.

 

The responsibility for ensuring the implementation of the policy and guidelines set forth in this statement rests with the Executive Director, Investment Committee and Management Committee.

 

A.  Financial and Investment Objectives

 

The Long-Term Investments have the dual purpose of providing a reserve for the support of the operations and continued development of AFS in financially stressed circumstances and so long as the identified requirements for reserves are met, serving as an endowment that provides

current short-term funding for special activities identified by the Governing Board.

 

Implicit in this objective is the financial goal of preserving and enhancing the inflation adjusted purchasing power of the Long-Term Investments.

 

 

 

The objective of the Long-Term Investments is to attain an average annual real total return (net of investment management fees) of at least 5.0% as measured over rolling five-year periods.

 

This objective should be achievable within risk levels defined by this policy.

 

B.  Spending Policy

 

The Investment Committee working with the Executive Director will currently specify the amount that may be drawn annually for endowment spending from the Long-Term Investment. However, the actual transfer of any funds from the Long-Term Investment to short-term investments requires the authorization of the President.

 

C.  Investment Management Structure

 

The Executive Director, with the advice of the Investment Committee, is authorized to place the Long-Term Investment in mutual funds. Such mutual funds will have a 5-year track record well above the average for mutual funds of that type and no more than 1/4 of the Long-Term Investment will be in any single mutual fund or mutual fund family except that a larger fraction may be in an index fund based on the Standard and Poor’s index or similar broad indicator of the market. Management of the Long-Term Investment may also be delegated to investment managers who are given full discretionary powers under the guidelines provided in this policy and supplemented by instructions from the Investment Committee through the Executive Director. Such investment managers will be appointed by the Governing Board with the advice

of the Committee and the ED.

 

The Committee will report at each meeting of the Council the performance of the Long-Term Investment and its managers. It is understood that when Long-Term Investment funds are invested in mutual funds or commingled funds, the Committee will accept the guidelines of the fund(s) and managers chosen.

 

D.  Portfolio Composition and Asset Allocation

 

To achieve its investment objective, the Long-Term Investment Fund will be divided into two major sub-components: An “Equity Fund” and a “Fixed Income Fund.” The purpose of dividing these investments in this manner is to ensure that the overall asset allocation between these two

 

asset classes remains under the regular scrutiny of the Investment Committee (and ED) and is not allowed to become the residual of separate manager decisions.

 

The Long-Term Investment will be diversified both by asset class and within asset classes (e.g., within equities by economic sector, industry, quality, and size). Moreover, the Equity Fund will be placed with managers who have distinct and different investment philosophies. The purpose of such diversification is to provide reasonable assurance that no single security, class of securities, or specific investment style will have a disproportionate impact on the Long-Term Investment’s aggregate results.

 

The purpose of the Equity Fund is to provide a total return that will provide for growth in principal and current income to support any desired spending requirements while increasing the purchasing power of the Long-Term Investment’s assets. AFS recognizes that the pursuit of these long-term objectives entails the assumption of market variability and risk.

 

The Equity Fund should normally represent 80% of total Long-Term Investment assets at market value. Although the actual percentage weighting in the Equity Fund will vary with market conditions, it will be closely monitored whenever levels exceed 90% or fall below 70%. Should the allocation move outside of these ranges, additional funds will be transferred as needed to bring the overall asset mix back within the policy range.

 

The purpose of the Fixed Income Fund is to reduce the overall volatility of the Long-Term Investment returns and to provide a hedge against the effects of a prolonged economic contraction. The Fixed Income Fund should normally represent 20% of the total Long-Term Investment assets at market value. Although the actual percentage will fluctuate with market conditions, levels below 10% and above 30% will be closely monitored by the Investment Committee.

 

In general, the Fixed Income portfolio will be diversified among different sectors of the fixed income market. Up to 15% of the Fixed Income Fund may be invested in quality ratings of below BBB. However, the overall average quality must be “AA.” With the exception of obligations of the U.S. Government and its agencies, no purchase will be made that will cause more than 5% of the Fixed Income Fund to be invested in the securities of any one issuer. The Fixed Income Fund may be invested in actively managed mutual funds to the extent that the Investment Committee deems appropriate.

 

Additions to principal will be allocated to investment managers by the Investment Committee (through the ED) following the general rule that new cash will be used to rebalance the total Long-Term Investment in the direction of the 80%/20% equity/fixed income ratio. It is anticipated that shifting assets among managers will occur infrequently.

 

E.  Performance Objectives

 

In addition to the overall objective of a real return of 5% over 5 year rolling period the following performance objectives are expected to be met by the fund and its individual components.

 

The total fund is expected to outperform the performance of a blended benchmark comprised of the returns of the following investable indexes in the weightings indicated: Wilshire 5000 80% Lehman Brothers Aggregate Bond Index 20%.

 

Equity managers are evaluated versus appropriate passive, fully-invested benchmarks regardless of the level of cash assets held by the investment manager. Assets held by equity managers are thus, considered 100% equity investments for purposes of asset allocation targets, and performance comparisons. The objectives of the Fixed Income Fund are to outperform (net of fees) the Lehman Brothers Aggregate Bond index.

 

F.  Risk Tolerance

 

Risks taken should be generally limited to those attendant to fluctuation of the market in the form of assets employed.

 

G. Monitoring of Objectives and Results

 

Both the mutual fund accounts and the individually managed portfolios will be monitored for consistency in each manager’s investment philosophy, return relative to objectives, investment risk as measured by asset concentrations, exposure to extreme economic conditions, and market volatility.

 

The Investment Committee will regularly review managers in order to confirm that the factors underlying performance expectations remain in place. They may request that the investment manager(s) be present in person or by phone at periodic meetings to present their portfolios and results to the Investment Committee.

 

All objectives and policies are in effect until modified by the Management Committee and approved by the Governing Board. If at any time a member of the Governing Board, Management Committee, Investment Committee, Executive Director or investment manager believes that an established policy or guideline inhibits the investment performance of the Long- Term Investment, it is that individual’s responsibility to clearly communicate this view to the Chair of the Investment Committee and ED.

 

Statement of Investment Policy and Objectives: Short-term Money

 

A.  Definition of Category

 

Short-Term Money includes all Cash and Cash Management Accounts. These are expected to equal or slightly exceed Current Liabilities minus Current Assets plus anticipated needs for capital over the next 12 months. Responsibility for management of the Short-Term Money is delegated to the Executive Director. The Executive Director may retain outside management for these funds.

 

B.  Purpose of Funds

 

A large fraction of these funds are required to pay the Society’s bills over each 12-month period.

 

The amount in this category of funds varies through the year as the Society’s income is seasonal and concentrated in the November-January time frame, whereas the Society’s expenses are more evenly spread throughout the year.

 

C. Risk Tolerance

 

This operating cash must be completely liquid and not subject to significant market (interest rate/duration) risk or credit quality risk. The remaining Short-Term Money is required to cover liabilities that may arise for prepaid orders, subscriptions, and employee benefits. Likewise, these funds should not be exposed to market or credit risk.

 

D.  Return Objectives

 

The objective is to maximize return consistent with insulation from capital loss. The return on

the first $1 million of such funds should compare favorably with widely used money market fund averages. The surplus over the first $1 million will be measured against the return on U.S. government notes of 2 years maturity.

 

E.  Authorized Securities

 

Types of securities authorized for Short-Term Money include: bank accounts including checking, savings and time deposit accounts, U.S. Treasury bills and other short-term government paper, commercial paper, and other cash equivalents with an average rating of AA and a maturity of

two years. The estimated requirements for the operating cash portion are to be kept in bank accounts or invested in cash equivalent securities.

 

F.  Monitoring of Objectives and Results

 

Individually managed portfolios will be monitored for consistency in each manager’s investment philosophy, return relative to objectives, investment risk as measured by asset concentrations, exposure to extreme economic conditions, and market volatility. Portfolios will be reviewed by the Investment Committee on a twice yearly basis.

 

The Investment Committee may request that the investment manager(s) be present at periodic meetings to present their portfolios and results to the Committee. In either case, the Committee will regularly review managers in order to confirm that the factors underlying performance expectations remain in place.

 

All objectives and policies are in effect until modified by the Management Committee and approved by the Governing Board. They will be reviewed at least annually for their continued appropriateness. If at any time a member of the Governing Board, Management Committee, Investment Committee, Executive Director or investment manager believes that an established policy or guideline inhibits the Short-Term Money investment performance, it is that individual’s responsibility to clearly communicate this view to the Chair of the Investment Committee.

 

Statement of Investment Policy and Objectives: Fixed Assets

 

A.  Definition of Category

 

Fixed Assets include Current Fixed Assets (Land, Building and Leasehold Improvements, and Equipment) and the related borrowing and lease purchases, all included in this package for purposes of policy and management. Responsibility for management of the Fixed Assets is delegated to the Executive Director.

 

B.  Monitoring the Funds

 

The fixed assets are never expected to be made liquid. Under no circumstances is the amount of the non-liquid reserves to go below zero nor is it expected to reduce markedly in any given year.

 

Transfers between Short-Term Money and Long-Term Investments

 

Transfer of any money from Long-Term Investments to Short-Term Money may be made only on authorization by the President and ED. A schedule of Long-Term Investments will be prepared in advance of each Governing Board meeting for the Investment Committee.

 

The Investment Committee will review the operating cash projections and whenever there appears to be more than a nominal amount above projected requirements in Short-Term Money will transfer the appropriate amount to Long-Term Investments.

 

Planned Giving Program

 

Goal:

 

  • To position the American Fisheries Society for launching a planned giving initiative for the future of the Society.

 

 

 

Process:

 

  • To remind Society members of the importance of making a will;

 

  • To introduce the idea of making a planned gift to the Society;

 

  • To identify a group of AFS members who might make a bequest to AFS; and

 

  • To continue to cultivate any interest expressed or commitment made by members to remember AFS in their will.

 

 

 

Action Plan:

 

  • Identify a member group to spearhead this effort.  The Past Presidents’ Advisory

Council is committed to lead this effort with support from AFS staff.

 

 

 

  • Identify previous and future planned gifts.  Prepare a list of donors who have made a planned gift to AFS in the past.  Also prepare a list of those members who have notified AFS of their intention to make a planned gift.

 

 

 

  • Identify prospects.  Review all donor files for planned giving prospects; examples are

30-year and 40-year members, Golden Members, Life Members, Past Presidents, and donors of large gifts.  Compile a list of prospects and provide this list to the Past Presidents’ Advisory Council for their review and additions.

 

 

 

  • Identify for each possible donor a personal member contact who would spearhead the effort personally.

 

 

 

  • Write an article on planned giving.  In 1989, AFS Executive Director Carl Sullivan wrote a nice article for Fisheries on bequests to AFS.  A similar article should be prepared as a kickoff event to the planned giving program.  It could be presented under the name of the Chair of the Past Presidents’ Advisory Council or the key person spearheading the planned giving effort for the PPAC.  When published, there should be a response card included in Fisheries for the convenience of members who wish to respond or seek additional information.  Reprints of the article should be distributed at AFS annual meetings, unit events, symposia, AFS trade shows and similar gatherings of members.

 

 

 

  • Create a bequest recognition group. This concept will be introduced in the Fisheries article on planned giving.  Past Presidents, Officers, and/or Governing Board Members could be invited to join as charter members of this group; this group may be helpful in identifying, evaluating, and cultivating prospective donors.

 

 

 

  • Design a brochure with tear-off reply card.   This brochure would be included in the first mailing to prospects after the appearance of the article on bequests in Fisheries; this brochure could accompany reprints of the article in future distributions.

 

 

 

  • Develop letters and enclosures for use in mailings to prospects:

 

1)  Prepare letters on AFS letterhead from the Chair of the Past Presidents’ Advisory Council or the key person spearheading the planned giving effort for the PPAC to introduce the program and to encourage members to request more information.

 

a)  Prepare an enclosure such as a reply card upon which the member may insert his/her name, address, telephone and check off appropriate boxes to indicate interest, to request information, or to make a commitment.

 

b)  Enclose a confidential, postage-paid reply envelope in mailings.

 

2) Create a Thank-you letter when a planned gift is made; acknowledge the gift in the

AFS annual report, with permission of donor.

 

3) Create a Follow-up letter when no response has been obtained by a certain date.

 

 

 

  • Create ads on planned giving.  These should be small, bold ads for insertion in

Fisheries to encourage members to remember AFS in their will.

 

 

 

  • Schedule an annual mailing.  This mailing of planned giving materials should coincide with a brief ad or a promotional article in Fisheries.

 

 

 

  • Monitor results.  The AFS staff and the Past Presidents’ Advisory Council will monitor results to determine appropriate follow up with prospects (information response, personal visits by volunteers, and other forms of interaction).

 

 

 

  • Maintain contact with bequest donors.  The Past Presidents’ Advisory Council and AFS staff will stay in touch with bequest donors, continuing to provide them with information on AFS so that the donor is made to feel appreciated and valued for his/her commitment.

 

Result:

 

The Society will have identified, approached, and cultivated those members most likely to be interested in making a planned gift to the Society and will have uncovered future sources of revenue.  This effort also may result in more life income gifts from the targeted group of AFS members.

 

New Initiatives

 

 

Purpose:

AFS New Initiatives are strategic projects that enhance member and unit services while

advancing the major goals and mission of the AFS.  These projects may be one-time activities or may entail the creation of new services and activities that later become routine operations (e.g., leadership development grants, new journals).

 

Background:

In 2005, the Enhancement of AFS Value Committee was appointed to develop recommendations

for AFS services and activities that could be accomplished under the increased financial security of AFS.  Under the guidance of the committee, the AFS Governing Board identified services and activities to enhance member services, aquatic stewardship, and information transfer and outreach.  Three projects were selected for further pursuit:

  • The development of an open-access, electronic journal dedicated to marine and coastal fisheries,
  • The support of AFS leadership development (through a grant for Governing Board

members’ travel to the mid-year meeting), and

  • The enhancement of public outreach by expanding the scope of AFS staff (through the hiring of a policy and public outreach coordinator in Bethesda).

These initiatives have now become routine operations and will not be affected by subsequent considerations of new initiatives.

 

General Overview:

New initiatives are focused on either membership services or unit services, but share the strategic

goal of maintaining and enhancing AFS relevancy.  Initiatives are identified from a variety of sources; some initiatives may generate funds, some will be revenue neutral, and some will entail continued costs.  The Executive Director in concurrence with the AFS Officers will identify the total amount of funds available to support each type of new initiative – i.e., funds available to support new unit services/activities, and total funds available to support new membership services/activities.

 

Unit services:  Initiatives for unit services provide seed money for activities or services to assist units in reaching their strategic goals and in carrying out their business.  Seed money will be returned to AFS after a period of time not less than 1 year, but not to exceed 3 years after completion of the project or activity.  Requests for funds to support meetings should adhere to the AFS policy on Support for Meetings (Section 12.11, under Section 12, Operational Policies and Procedures).

 

Membership services:  Ideas for initiatives for membership services may come from various sources, including focus groups, membership surveys, units, individual members, and AFS staff. These needs should be activities or services that are not available elsewhere.  Providing services to meet these needs becomes an investment in our future, with the desired outcome being the retention and recruitment of young professionals and students to AFS, and maintaining our relevancy as a professional association.

 

 

Operational Guidelines, Unit Services:

The purpose of this section is to establish guidelines for the identification, selection, and

implementation of new initiatives to support unit services.

 

Application submission process

The Executive Director will send the application and guidelines for preparation and submission of applications to unit Presidents (Division Presidents may forward material to Chapter Presidents).  The Executive Director will also suggest an upper limit for individual requests.

 

Successful applications will include a brief narrative describing the strategic goal of the initiative, the need for the initiative, how the success of the initiative will be measured, the amount requested, and a description of how and when funds will be generated to return the seed money.  Units submitting single requests that encompass multiple tasks will be asked to prioritize tasks in the event that a full request cannot be granted.

 

To ensure equal consideration, applications will be due January 5 (or the first business day after the 5th), with funding outcome to be determined no later than 15 February.  This will avoid units seeking funds for the same initiative at the mid-year Governing Board meeting (in the form of a motion with budget implications).

 

Completed applications will be submitted electronically to the President with copies to the

Executive Director on January 5th.

 

Selection criteria

The Governing Board will screen the applications and make the awards; late applications will not be considered.  The screening process is general, seeking to ensure that seed moneys will be repaid and that the activities proposed are consistent with the AFS mission. Screening and Governing Board voting may occur electronically.  Applications approved for funding will be those that make a strong case for the unit’s ability to recover funds.  All approved applications will be funded.  However, if the total funds requested across units exceed that available, then approved awards will be funded to ensure representation across Divisions and among Sections, and to facilitate funding of initiatives from units that have not received prior funding.

 

Reporting requirements

Units funded through this process are required to submit progress reports to the Governing Board in time for the mid-year and annual meetings of the Board.  Progress reports should be brief and include a statement on outcomes, challenges, and progress towards returning funds.

 

A list of funded initiatives will be posted to the AFS web site by AFS staff.

 

Operational Guidelines, Membership Services:

The purpose of this section is to establish guidelines for the identification, selection, and

implementation of new initiatives to support membership services.  In general, the Executive Director develops business plans for 3-5 initiatives deemed to be of highest priority, and the Governing Board selects initiatives to pursue, depending on costs and other factors.

 

 

Ideas for initiatives to support membership services may come from various sources, including membership surveys and focus groups (these ideas would be identified in reports of the committees responsible for such surveys), AFS units, individual members, and AFS staff.  The Management committee will have access to reports and findings of survey committees and may elect to propose ideas from these sources.

 

Proposal submission process

In early October, the Executive Director sends a call for proposal for new initiatives to support membership services to the Governing Board, the general membership, and AFS staff.  The call includes guidelines and deadlines for submission (January 5th).  Guidelines for proposing new initiatives for membership services are established by the Governing Board.

 

Initiatives should include a brief narrative describing the strategic goal of the initiative, the need for the initiative, and a description of how the initiative benefits AFS members.  Other criteria may be established by the Management Committee.  Initiatives should state if they are predicted to be a cost burden, budget neutral, or budget enhancing.

 

Proposals for new initiatives are submitted by January 5th (or the first business day after the 5th) to the New Initiatives Coordinator, who is a member of the Management Committee, appointed for a one-year term by the President in consultation with the Management Committee.

 

The Coordinator considers proposals and may request clarification or merging of 2 or more initiatives that are similar.  The Coordinator prepares a list of proposed initiatives and presents the list, along with accompanying proposals, to the AFS Officers and ED, no less than 3 weeks prior to the mid-year meeting.

 

Selection criteria

The Governing Board in concurrence with the Executive Director will select no more than 5 initiatives for further consideration.  Selection may be accomplished through email voting, with each voting member of the Board selecting (and ranking) his/her top 3 priorities.  Criteria for selection include (1) alignment with strategic goals and mission of the AFS, (2) cost considerations, and (3) ability to evaluate success of the outcome.  Higher priority may be placed on initiatives that address the retention and recruitment of young professionals and students to AFS, and to those that focus on maintaining our relevancy as a professional association.  The Board votes are tallied and the overall top 5 candidates are selected for business plan development.  The outcome will be communicated to the Governing Board at the mid-year meeting.

 

The Executive Director, working with the originator(s) of the proposals, will develop business plans for selected initiatives and present the plans to the Governing Board at the following mid- year meeting.  Typically, business plans will require 6 months to 1 year to develop.

 

 

At the mid-year meeting, the Governing Board will review the business plans, and as warranted, select initiatives to support based on available funds.  Business plans for new initiatives should be examined in light of the long-term financial status of AFS.  The Governing Board may elect

 

to partially fund an initiative if existing funds are insufficient (e.g., an initiative may require 2 or

3 years of funding to be fully funded).  In the case of initiatives requiring more than 1 year of funding, the Executive Director will include budget costs for years 2+ in the proposed AFS budget.  To ensure the financial well-being of AFS, it is desirable to select at least 1 new initiative that will generate revenue (rather than being revenue-neutral or revenue-negative). Unfunded initiatives may be resubmitted in later years for consideration.

 

Disaster Relief

 

Organization

 

The American Fisheries Society (AFS) disaster relief will focus on professional needs of Society members.  Other agencies and institutions have responsibility for humanitarian needs. This does not mean that AFS is not sensitive to personal needs of members.  To the contrary, addressing professional need is fundamental to addressing human need because during times of disaster, professional capacity is critical to restoring order and generating outreach in communities as well as generating/reestablishing definition in the lives of individual persons.

 

The organizational structure of AFS will be utilized in disaster response.  The President of the AFS Division within which the disaster occurs will have the principal leadership role in terms of (1) recommending to the Society President that disaster be declared, and (2) activating and directing disaster relief within the Division.  Tasks can be assigned by the Division President but the Division President has ultimate authority and responsibility.  Chapter communications to the Division President will come through the Chapter President or a person designated by the Chapter President unless the Chapter President has been impacted by the disaster to the extent that he/she cannot function in this capacity.  In such a case, the Division President, in

consultation with the Society President, will appoint a chapter contact person (preferably from the chapter membership).

 

Operations

 

The most important activity immediately following the disaster is to locate AFS members in the impacted area.  This is essential in order to keep them connected and in communication with the professional support system provided by the AFS.  This initial contact will clearly communicate what AFS services are available and how they can be obtained.  It will also provide each member with the contact information for their Chapter President or other designated

disaster relief coordinator for the Chapter.

 

For this activity to function, it is essential that membership rosters be kept up to date in the Chapter, Division and Society records.  These records should include persons who hold Society and Chapter memberships, those who hold only Society memberships, and those who hold only Chapter memberships.  Without up-to date-rosters, there can be no certainty that all members have been accounted for following a disaster.

 

Displaced members should make every effort to contact their Chapter President.  If this cannot be done, then displaced members should contact the Society Office.  The Society Office will then contact the Division President who in turn will contact the Chapter President or other designated contact for the Chapter.

 

Establish a centralized distribution and control center outside of the impacted area.  This center will serve as the operational hub for communications and for the coordination of relief activities, including identification of need and availability of materials.  This center will be staffed by one paid Coordinator, selected by the Division President and approved by Division Officers.  The Coordinator’s job is to maintain operations, communications, and records for disaster relief. The Coordinator will report directly to the Division President.  It is the responsibility of the Division President to determine the flow of communication between

 

Coordinator, Chapters, and Division.  The Society through the Division should be prepared to employ the coordinator up to 2 years following the disaster.

 

It should be noted that the Coordinator could handle multiple disasters in the same division were it necessary to do so.  However, if there were a new disaster in a different division, it is recommended that a new Coordinator be hired, if the AFS is financially able to do so.

 

Establish a relief disbursement center on the edge of the impacted area.  This enables relief supplies from outside the impacted area to get to (not in) the area.  Although persons from outside the impacted area may have good intentions regarding disbursement of relief supplies, they can encounter local challenges due to their unfamiliarity with the area and current situation. It is best for AFS members staffing the relief disbursement center to take responsibility for transport and disbursement of relief supplies into the impacted area.  The relief disbursement center is staffed by volunteers, not paid staff.  However, the Coordinator will coordinate donated items from the donor(s) to the relief disbursement center and from the center to the intended recipient(s).

 

Fiscal Responsibilities of Disaster Relief

 

All financial donations toward disaster relief will be made to the Society Disaster Relief Donation Fund.  Any donations received by the affected Division will be forwarded to the Society Disaster Relief Donation Fund.  The Society will periodically update the affected Division on donations that have been received in order for the affected Division to make best use of the monies.

 

The affected Division will set up a separate bank account to address disaster relief and will be the sole distributor of the Division’s disaster relief distribution funds to affected AFS members.  The Division Treasurer will manage the distribution of monies as well as maintain and manage the account.  The Division EXCOM or an individual or group appointed by the Division President will prepare a budget for anticipated distribution of funds.  As needed, the Division will request transfer of funds from the Society Disaster Relief Donation Fund to the Division.  The affected Division will be responsible for providing the Society Governing Board and the AFS Executive Director with financial statements (income/expenses/balance) periodically and upon request.  When preparing its annual income tax return, the Division must account for funds received from the Society Disaster Relief Donation Fund as well as expenses

to the Division’s disaster relief distribution account because these actions are Division functions.

 

Response Framework

 

  • · The AFS Disaster Relief Website will be maintained on the Division website for the affected area with a link from the Society Website.

 

  • · The Society will hold in reserve a designated amount for disaster relief.

 

Immediately Following an Event:

 

  • · Division President will immediately contact the Chapter President(s) in the impacted area. The Chapter President(s) will make recommendations to the Division President regarding an AFS declaration of disaster.  If the Chapter President(s) cannot be contacted, the Division President will make contact with another elected Chapter representative.
  • · Chapter President(s) or other designated chapter representative(s) will immediately begin locating members in their respective chapter(s) and checking off members using current rosters.  These check-offs will be forwarded periodically to the Division President who in turn will forward them to the Society Office. Additionally, Chapter President(s) will collaborate with the Society office to identify and locate Society members in the region who are not Chapter members.

 

 

  • · Division President will immediately contact the Society President and request (1) a disaster declaration, (2) permission to establish a distribution and control center, (3) permission to seek and hire a coordinator for the distribution and control center and (4) release of one third of the Society’s budgeted disaster relief funds to the Division.

 

  • · Society President will call an emergency meeting of Society Officers and the AFS Executive Director to determine if a disaster declaration is warranted, and if so will request approval to release disaster relief funds, establish a distribution and control center, and hire a coordinator for the center.

 

  • · Following these actions by the Society Officers, the Society Governing Board will be notified.

 

  • · Following declaration of disaster by Society President, the Division President will establish liaison with the impacted Chapter(s) via the respective Chapter President(s) or designated Chapter representative to identify immediate professional needs of impacted AFS members and authorize the Division Treasurer to establish an independent account for the Division’s disaster relief distribution funds.

 

Recommended Outreach Schedule:

 

  • · Within 2 weeks of the disaster: the Society and Division disaster relief funding mechanisms will be in place.

 

  • · Within 2 weeks of the disaster: all AFS Society members will receive notification that disaster relief has been activated and provided information regarding mechanisms for disaster relief donations.

 

  • · Within 2 months of the disaster: the distribution and control center will be staffed and operational.

 

  • · Within 2 months of the disaster: all impacted AFS members will be individually identified, located, and if possible, contacted by their Chapter representative(s) to advise them of relief support coming from AFS (i.e., complimentary memberships, subscriptions, availability of scholarships to AFS meetings, and the Division’s disaster relief distribution and control center).

 

  • · Within 6 months of the disaster: impacted AFS members receiving scholarships to AFS Meetings will be notified of their awards.

 

  • · Subject to the availability of funds (e.g., corporate sponsors, donations), AFS should consider awarding grants to members and their affiliated institutions in the impacted region to help support completion of thesis and dissertation projects impacted by the disaster.

 

Reference

 

Heitman, J. F., D. C. Jackson, R. L. Curry, and D. Pender. (accepted for publication).

Development and implementation of the American  Fisheries Society Hurricane Relief Initiative.  In K. Mclaughlin, editor.                               Proceedings of the AFS-Sea Grant Symposium: mitigating impacts of natural hazards on fishery ecosystems.  American Fisheries Society

2007 Annual Meeting.  San Francisco, California.

 

Fisheries Conservation Foundation

 

Memorandum of Understanding between the

Fisheries Conservation Foundation and the American Fisheries Society

 

1. Purpose

 

The Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is made and entered between the Fisheries Conservation Foundation (FCF) and the American Fisheries Society (AFS).  Both signatories of this MOU are referred to as “Partners.”

 

The purpose of this MOU is to designate a collaborative relationship between FCF and AFS

in which the partners assist each other in carrying out their respective missions.

 

 

 

II. Background

 

FCF, founded in 2003, is a science-based conservation-oriented foundation representing fisheries scientists.  FCF promotes public awareness of fisheries resource issues and relevant scientific research, as well as the enlightened management of fisheries resources for their optimum use and enjoyment by the public.

 

AFS, founded in 1870, is the oldest and largest professional society in the world representing fisheries and aquatic scientists.  AFS seeks to improve the conservation and sustainability of fishery resources and aquatic ecosystems by advancing fisheries and aquatic sciences and promoting the development of fisheries professionals.

 

III. Mutual Benefits

 

It is mutually beneficial for FCF and AFS to work together to:

 

1.   Increase scientific knowledge on important fisheries resource issues;

2.   Communicate science-based information to relevant decision makers;

3.   Increase public awareness of fisheries resource conservation issues;

3.   Identify strategies to assure that resource management is based on sound science;

4.   Develop support to help implement such strategies among relevant constituencies and the general public.

 

IV Responsibilities

 

FCF and AFS will together work to:

 

Encourage fisheries scientists and managers to conduct new education/outreach programs designed to distribute scientific findings to decision makers and the public;

 

Organize meetings, workshops, and other events for scientists, non-governmental organizations, resources managers, and policy makers to develop plans and policy considerations for fisheries resource conservation efforts.

 

Develop tools to communicate relevant scientific information to decision makers and the public.

 

Develop and market strategic proposals for funding from individuals, private foundations, government agencies, and other sources to support collaborative work.

 

It is mutually agreed and understood by the partners that:

 

1.   This MOU is neither a fiscal nor a funding obligation document.

 

2.   It shall be the goal of both parties to ensure joint organizational recognition (e.g., logos, urls) on relevant public events/products produced as joint efforts under this MOU.

 

3.   Each signatory party shall obtain prior approval from the other for all joint press releases, advertisements, or other statements regarding projects or work products specified under this MOU and intended for the media, relevant decision makers, or the public.  Each party need not obtain such prior approval for any activity conducted solely and independently.

 

4.   The Partners shall consult regularly to discuss actions to implement the purpose of this MOU.

 

V.  Terms of Agreement

 

This agreement shall be reviewed by both partners annually to determine whether it should be  continued,  modified,  or  terminated.  This  agreement  shall  have  no  specified  term limitation, but may be terminated by either party upon 30 days written notice.

 

VI. Principal Contacts:

The principal contacts for this agreement are: Dr. David P. Philipp, Executive Director

Fisheries Conservation Foundation

1816 South Oak Street

Champaign, IL 61820

(301) 897-8616 (x208) Phone

(301) 897-8096 Fax

[correct email address]

 

 

Dr. Doug Austen, Executive Director

American Fisheries Society

5410 Grosvenor Lane, Ste. 110

Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 897-8616 Phone (301) 897-8096 Fax dausten@fisheries.org

 

ANNUAL MEETING GUIDELINES

 

 

2008 Edition (rev 4/08)

 

Foreword

 

The AFS Annual Meeting Guidelines Manual is intended as a briefing for a local chapter or agency that has decided to host a future annual meeting of the American Fisheries Society.

 

Wrap-up reports are available in the AFS office from previous annual meetings for hands-on information.  Past Program and General Meeting Chairs can be your best allies and sources of information, about handling the tasks at hand.  Please consult these reports and contact past organizers whenever you need additional advice.

 

Bidding for an Annual Meeting

 

The American Fisheries Society solicits bids from chapters and state agencies for its annual meetings more than four years prior to the actual event.  The bids are typically solicited on a rotating basis among AFS Divisions, but there is nothing to preclude solicitations “out-of- traditional-sequence,” especially when an insufficient number of bids are obtained from the targeted “geographic” Division.

 

A bidder’s package is normally requested by prospective hosts, from the AFS Office late winter or early spring.  The package provides guidelines and historical figures about attendance and numbers of hotel rooms used at past annual meetings.  The package requires prospective hosts to address items such as availability and price of air transportation, anticipated costs of hotel and meeting rooms, cost of services and amenities, entertainment options, expected climate and weather conditions, availability of AFS members to help plan and host the conference, and various other information. Per instructions from the AFS Office, the bid package is submitted during late spring or early summer by mail to the Chair of the AFS Time and Place Committee.

It is ultimately considered by the Time and Place Committee at the fall AFS Annual Meeting exactly four years prior to the event being proposedThe Time and Place Committee allows face-to-face presentations by the host Chapter and/or by city representatives, reaches consensus on a selection, and presents findings to the Incoming Governing Board later in the week.  The Governing Board decides whether to accept the Committee’s selection.

 

Tips for Successful Submissions

 

Successful bids usually have the strong support of a local AFS Chapter and/or a regionally based state or federal agency willing to help sponsor the event by providing volunteer employees and services to offset some of the costs associated with organizing such a large conference.  Bidders may wish to include representatives from the local Chapter and the local Convention and Visitor’s Bureau when they present their justifications to the Time and Place Committee.  These groups often prepare and show high-quality slide presentations or videos that depict the locale and its amenities.

 

In addition the most successful bids to host AFS annual meetings have been those demonstrating a wide variety of competitive airfares to the host city, reasonable hotel rates to accommodate a large block of rooms for attendees, centralized lodging and conference facilities, free use of convention facilities (often based on expected hotel occupancies), availability of discounted student room rates, and a host of social activities and attractions for members and family guests.

 

Past successful bids are also typically associated with a large number of AFS members in the host city or its surrounds – individuals who are willing to work on Local Arrangements-related activities.

 

Remuneration

 

1. The basic host unit for AFS Annual Meetings is an AFS chapter(s).  Host chapters will be offered a monetary return from the annual meeting they host, as a fixed percentage of that meeting’s net proceeds.  The host chapter may elect not to request such reimbursement. Alternatively, the host chapter may wish to designate all or a portion of their return to a specific AFS activity (such as the Skinner Student Travel Fund, Hutton Fund, and other specific Society needs).

 

2. The monetary return to the host chapter will be 10% of the net proceeds of the annual meeting. (Past net proceeds have ranged from $50,000 to over $100,000 from an AFS annual meeting, so host chapters can expect as much as 10K or more, for their efforts.)

 

3. The Society takes on all of the contractual risk in coordinating an annual meeting.  The Society also contributes staff hours and other labor costs, travel, and conference materials in helping to orchestrate an annual meeting.

 

4.  Divisions will receive 10% of the net proceeds if they forgo their regularly scheduled annual meeting and hold it in conjunction with the Society annual meeting.

Suggested Timeline Two Years Out August – September

 

Prepare to attend the Annual Meeting two years prior and the year prior to yours.  AFS will provide you with seed money if you are not able to have your travel funded by your office.

Make sure key people are planning to attend.  Often, the local convention and visitor bureau will

also attend to drum up interest in next year’s meeting.  Make use of this free service.

 

Conduct a preliminary meeting at the conference hotel with AFS staff, key members of the Arrangements Subcommittee, host hotel staff, and local convention and visitor’s bureau representatives to view facilities, establish relationships, define basic duties and schedules.

 

Begin fund raising.  It is never too early to start and it is important because contributors make budgets years in advance.

 

Year Before The Meeting

 

January-February

 

Hold a second meeting to ensure all contracts are adequate and in force, to initiate meeting budgeting process, to ensure subcommittees are fully staffed and charged with their duties, and to establish communication and coordination procedures among all meeting planners.

 

Begin search for speakers.  Program Committee with the AFS President has the lead, and must coordinate with the GMC.

 

If you have any need for catering an off-site event, start looking around. NegotiateA very valuable resource can be a local culinary association.

 

March-May

 

Establish the preliminary budget during a meeting of the Arrangements Committee.  Financial requests should be estimated for a rough draft budget.  Remember to include funds for promotion done by the AFS office.

 

Gather data on number of attendees by category (member, student, spouse, etc.), number attending social functions, quantities of food and beverage consumed, $$ spent on each function, etc.  This information is available in prior year’s wrap up reports that you can obtain through the AFS office.

 

Finalize the location of any off-site events.  Permits required for serving alcohol can sometimes be a hassle.  Use your imagination and see what your city has to offer.  People always enjoy the “fish fry”, but it is very common; variety is always welcomed.  Remember transportation.  Most buses carry 40 adults.  How many will you need?  Do you need fancy coaches or will school buses do?

 

People on the steering committee should have a good feel for their responsibilities by now.

You’ll still be recruiting to fill gaps but most tasks should be well covered.

 

If you plan on having entertainment at a banquet or any other function and have not yet made a

selection, you’d better do so soon.  Many entertainers book well in advance.

 

Get cost estimates from the hotel/caterer for coffee breaks, receptions, etc.  Play with menus and see where you can cut costs.  Menus submitted by the hotel can be changed.  They will customize something for you within your budget framework.  Negotiate to pay for coffee by the gallon and pastries and bagels by the dozen if the AFS office hasn’t done this earlier.  Our members are notorious for swarming to free food and drink and making a meal of it!  The menu

can be refined at a later date.  When budgeting leave room for an increase in prices if they cannot be set at this point in time. Beer is the hands-down favorite, but don’t forget wine and soft

drinks.  Get changes in writing.  Understand the caterer’s language (does per item mean per fish

or per serving?  What exactly does corkage mean?)

 

June

 

Work with the Fisheries staff and Abstract Coordinator to update the Call for Papers.  Decide topics for the short sidebar that changes each month in the Call for Papers.

 

Subcommittee reports and final budget requests due to the GMC.

 

Draft of budget due to the Executive Director and the Director of Administration and Finance.

 

July

 

A progress report should be in hand from all subcommittees.  Reconfirm assignments and deadline dates for individual subcommittee activities.

 

First call for papers is due in early July for publication in the September issue of Fisheries. Also include a brief write-up about the meeting site, dates, hotels, etc.  Though still a long way off, early exposure is important.

 

August

 

Begin developing the meeting web site, to be hosted on the AFS web site.

 

Governing Board Meeting at annual meeting – Report of GMC to the Governing Board on general program including budget and proposed registration fee for approval.

 

After Governing Board approval:  GMC shall authorize subcommittee budgets which constitute authority for each subcommittee chair to incur obligations to the total amount approved, only. Each subcommittee will keep a record of its expenditures and financial obligations.

 

Attend the annual meeting, observe, take notes, take photographs (they really help sub chairs who can’t attend), and talk to the local arrangements folks.  Take notes.  Pay attention to attendees also.  If you notice that someone looks lost, decide if a sign at that location would have been helpful.  If you hear someone complaining or sound frustrated, see how you would alleviate the particular problem next year.  Be “in touch” with what’s going on.  Learn from mistakes you observe.

 

At the Business Meeting the Program Chair and GMC will make a presentation highlighting next

year’s meeting and unveil the poster.  Lots of rah, rah!

 

Attend the wrap up session following the meeting for helpful hints from the planning committee, convention center / hotel staff, caterer, etc.  A great learning experience.  Second Call for Papers due for publication in October.

 

September

 

Third Call for Papers due for November issue. Begin making regular contact with hotel/convention center staff.  Good working relationships are important to the success of your meeting

 

Begin monthly committee meetings.  This is very important!  Recommended reading is “How to Make Meetings Work,” by Michael Doyle and Davis Straus.  Brainstorming and keeping up with each other’s’ progress is productive.  Publish minutes of each meeting for each member and copies to the AFS staff, President and President-elect, etc.

 

The Trade Show Chairman can begin drumming up local interest and working with the AFS Office Coordinator or contractor.  This person will handle all local trade show arrangements and be the contact between headquarters and the trade show decorator.  The mailings, exhibitor registrations, etc., are all handled through the AFS Office or contractor.

 

October

 

Fourth Call for Papers due for publication in the December issue.

 

AFS Office will prepare a registration form and do the first promotional mailing.

 

Open an interest-bearing bank account and order checks.  Apply for sales tax exempt status so

you won’t have to pay sales tax.

 

Meeting web site promoting the location, dates, speakers, theme, hotels, etc. should be ready and posted.  AFS will host the web site with access given to the local webmaster.

 

November

 

Prepare a write-up about the area and what there is to see and do, to submit for the January issue of Fisheries (due by November 15). Send the office a list of all chairs with phone, fax and e- mail addresses if not already done.

 

December

 

The steering committee meetings are critical for exchange of ideas.  No one realizes the amount of time that goes into seemingly minor decisions.

 

Nail down the general schedule for the week and any major items (event locations/themes) that are not yet finalized.  When will the business meeting, raffle, banquet, mixer, etc. take place? Contact your transportation company.

 

Provide the hotel/convention center with the master schedule of events from the previous year, as a starting point.  Most of the Governing Board meetings before the convention are the same, year after year, as are the luncheons throughout the week.  The hotel can enter these events in their computer and begin function sheets for each event.  All the details (such as seating arrangements, number of people, food to be served, equipment needed, etc.) will be fine-tuned as information comes in from AFS or the Program Chairman.  It’s helpful to keep the hotel up-to-date so that neither you nor they are overwhelmed the month before the meeting.  The AFS Office will

handle all the functions they are responsible for and have a separate account with the hotel. Make sure there is a clear understanding on the part of the hotel about what functions get billed to the AFS Office and what gets billed to the local host.

 

Letters should go out to all Section Presidents calling for meeting room needs (Section Business Meetings) and/or special tours.  You’ll want to know: estimated attendance, projection or other A/V needs, length of meeting, preferred seating style (conference, classroom, theater?), and preferred date/time (if they have a choice).  Try to schedule all of these before the technical sessions.  Letters should also mention the opportunity for the Section to organize and sponsor a symposium.  Ask the Continuing Education Committee Chair about Continuing Ed courses also. (Check with Manager of Unit Services in the AFS Office.)  The Program Chair and AFS President should be consulted about special scheduling needs.

 

Once all your time slots for events other than the technical program are set, let the Program Chair know the daily blocks of time he/she will have in which to schedule papers.

 

Suggestions for special sessions are due in December, so keep in close contact with the Program Chair.  The number of sessions will dictate much of the space needed and the scheduling of events.

 

Obtain a list of proposed special sessions and other program information the Program Chair may have.  Prospective delegates will be requesting such information for justifying attendance.  This will also come in handy when contacting possible sponsors/contributors.

 

The Public Relations person, working with AFS staff, should put together a general announcement including information about the program, trade show, Plenary, social events, etc. Mail out to media, commercial fishing groups, scientific organizations, consulting firms, politicians, and possible local exhibitors. (Postage adds up, so please budget accordingly.)

 

Find out if any of your facilities require that they be specifically named in AFS’s liability insurance.  The AFS Office will provide you with a general liability policy.

 

Assign someone the responsibility of taking meeting minutes.  These notes can be passed on to the AFS office and the next year’s Arrangement Committee, as well as your own.  It’s a good reminder of who’s responsible for what.

 

The February Fisheries article is due.

 

Have a relaxing holiday season!! The pace will pick up after the New Year!

 

Year Of The Meeting

 

January

 

Trade Show – continue contacting local groups to drum up business (local agencies, computer stores, fish/seafood processors, artisans, fishing guides/outfitters, etc.).

 

Put your feelers out for good slides depicting the meeting location.  Several committee members may want to submit slides; also check the photo bank at the local convention and visitor’s bureau. You’ll want photos for the April and June issue of Fisheries, including a vertical format photo for the supplement cover.

 

Will your hotel match up individuals requesting a roommate?  If not, decide how or if to handle this.  It’s not much work and is highly appreciated by students and others traveling alone.  This can be mentioned in the “hotel information” section of the March issue of Fisheries (due January

15). As individuals call, act as a referral service, passing on the name and number of possible roommates.  It is their responsibility to contact the person and make all arrangements. Ask them to call back so you know to cross them off the list or keep them in the pool.

 

Write an informative article for the March issue of Fisheries and send it in, with accompanying photos before January 15.

 

Familiarize yourselves with meeting room requests and the meeting rooms themselves so that you may begin scheduling.  Try to schedule technical sessions with similar themes in the same room throughout the meeting.  Section business meeting requests should be in by now. Everything will inevitably be shuffled around before it falls into place.  One person should be responsible for scheduling all non-technical meetings.

 

Abstracts are due this month.  Contact the Program Chair to determine the number of concurrent sessions.  Space will hopefully not be a limiting factor.

 

Make sure you date every item of correspondence, schedule, floor plan, etc. to alleviate confusion once revised plans start coming in.  A spreadsheet is imperative so you can keep track of all schedule changes.  There are several options available from previous meetings

 

In addition to the monthly Arrangements Committee meeting, begin holding subcommittee meetings.

 

Check into state requirements/legalities concerning the raffle.  Some states have become very

picky.  If a state is too picky sometimes playing “dumb” is the only answer.

 

Begin soliciting sponsors for the meeting bags if you haven’t already done so, or coordinate with your fundraising chair.  (Sponsor logos sometimes are printed on the back side of the bag.)

 

Choose a color scheme if desired. You can coordinate colors for bags, abstract covers, programs, signage, trade show decorating, meeting logo/letterhead, etc.

 

Continue soliciting donations/sponsorships.  Some commitments should start rolling in. Make final selection of commercial printer if not provided by host agency.

February

 

Confirm commitments with entertainers.

 

Get written contracts for all service agreements.

 

Abstracts are sent to Program Committee this month for review.  Should know exact number of accepted papers by mid-late month, then scheduling can begin.

 

Contact the Continuing Education Committee Chair and the Unit Services Coordinator about continuing education courses to be held during the convention.  Have them provide the necessary information to include in the registration form in the April Fisheries.

 

Start pulling information together for the April mini-supplement and June full supplement for Fisheries.  For April, you will need the pre-registration form and brief description about the hotels, transportation, program, plenary if possible, tours, socials, etc. The mini-supplement is due in mid-February. The June issue, due in early April is a biggie and needs to include everything. Don’t worry about listing rooms and exact times for talks at this point, as it is sure to change.  You will need: pre-registration form, airline, tour and car rental information, hotel costs and phone numbers,  map of the area, on-site registration schedule, trade show, special events (receptions, banquet, Spawning Run, etc.), advertisements, special luncheons with registration forms, program overview, program details, continuing education workshops with registration forms, etc. Much of the material can be assembled from the monthly articles already submitted and published.

 

Don’t handle tour tickets or related funds.  Work this out with your tour company in advance so they know what’s expected of them before the meeting as well as on-site.

 

Have copies of the meeting information on hand.  Extra meeting supplements are available from the AFS Office.  Many people who don’t receive Fisheries will request information and this could be very time consuming if you don’t make up several packets in advance.  Also, pass these packets on to your hotel, tour company, visitor’s bureau, convention center, etc., as it is helpful

to keep them informed.

 

Get AFS membership forms from the AFS Office to send out with the requested information. Let people know in advance that they can become a member and register for the meeting for the same cost as registering as a non-member.

 

Send requests for special invitation letters for foreign registrants to AFS Office.

 

The second mailing for the trade show goes out around the end of February (handled through

AFS office).

 

March

 

Work on continuing education information for May issue of Fisheries and submit by March 15.

 

Start working on conference t-shirts.  Find the best local silk screener, or check with the AFS office for a suggestion.  Come up with a t-shirt design.  Check with two previous meeting committees about how many were sold, so you don’t over-order.  Student groups usually are offered the opportunity to use this event as a fund raiser.

 

Meet with your tour company to make sure they’re on track with spouse tours and any other tours they’re handling.

 

Set a policy on discounts or waivers of registration fees for students willing to work as projectionists or providing other help during the meeting.  You may waive the registration fee if

 

they commit to a regular work schedule for the full week.  Indicate first, second, and third choices of sessions to work so they can participate while also being useful.  (Some local organizing committees simply pay students a fixed dollar amount, and let them use these proceeds for registering.)  Schedule a training time for student and other AV workers early in the meeting week.

 

Have you made arrangements for the Governing Board Retreat?  An informal atmosphere away from the meeting site is preferred.  Check with the AFS office to see if one should be scheduled

 

April

 

Put together a list of all technical session titles and their times, as these are also requested for justification to attend the meeting (if possible can be done in March).

Check with the AFS Trade Show Coordinator about discounted booths for local artisans. AFS Office sends letters out to all contributed paper authors informing them of the sessions

they’re in, as well as day and time of session (also posters and alternates).

 

The June full supplement for Fisheries is due. A proof will be sent for your approval in early May. Pay extra close attention to the published schedule and try to get AFS committees and sections to finalize their meeting times to avoid numerous “TBAs” in the June issue.

 

May

 

Check into renting radio-phones or cell phones.  These are invaluable for rapid communications among key Local Arrangements Committee staffers during the conference.  They are highly recommended or you’ll do a lot of unnecessary running around.  Test them ahead of time to

make sure they are powerful enough to use in the buildings.  Many times these can be donated by a phone or communications company.

 

Work on room scheduling (if possible can be done in April).

 

Send business meeting schedules to AFS Section Presidents and other meeting planners.  Times are more important than room assignments at this point.

 

Start thinking about A/V needs: slide projectors, carousels, LCD projectors, microphones, pointers, screens, podiums, etc. and arrange for spares of everything (especially projector bulbs).

 

Check on everything your facility can provide and assume nothing.

 

Make arrangements to secure AFS banner and podium cover from AFS office to be hung at the

Plenary Session.

 

Fill in program grid for the program book with abstract information that AFS will provide.  AFS

will provide local host with camera-ready text for printed abstract book.  Get bids from printers –

3 ring binders.

 

Make sure people involved with registration are familiar with the computer and the registration software.  Work out any bugs.  Plan for contingencies such as a PC hard drive locking up or a power outage.  AFS staff will handle on site registration.  They will need 2 PC’s and 2 HP desk jet printers.  Make sure to have extra ink cartridges.

 

Designate a secure space for storing the raffle prizes that are sure to begin rolling in. Get camera-ready logos from the organizations sponsoring the meeting bags.

Submit the July Fisheries article, which can wrap up loose ends or highlight the raffle.

 

June

 

Begin collecting items that will be included in the registration packets (a few “goodies” that have some lasting value, area brochures, coupons, local fishing information, special convention announcements, etc.).  However, don’t insert useless clutter.  Work with the AFS Office on final contents in package.

 

Firm up any service contracts that are not yet finalized (catering, equipment rentals, transportation, entertainment, etc.).  AFS Office signs and keeps a copy.

 

Emphasize the need for several food stations at all events.  Long lines continue to frustrate people, year after year.

 

Finalize artwork for t-shirts and decide on order.  All should be “preshrunk.” The size extra large will run out first and then large.  XX large and children’s shirts will also sell in smaller quantities.  Also order Spawning Run shirts.

 

Spawning Run (or other AFS sport events):  decide on course, purchase prizes (if not donated), arrange for stop-watches, megaphone, and all other equipment and assistance you’ll need to carry out this event

 

Order registration meeting bags.

 

Get updated list of trade show exhibitors from AFS office and prepare camera-ready copy for program.

 

Make a sign-up list for jobs that still need assistance.  Get commitments for all the “little details.”

 

Arrange for contacts for child care.  Be aware of local and legal implications of trying to handle it yourself.  Let attendees make their own arrangements with vendors.  You can provide a list of them in the daily bulletin.

 

Submit your final Fisheries article for August, and work on the schedule for the professional photographer with Fisheries staff.

 

July

 

Contact media with general announcement about the meeting.

 

Make up an on-site registration work schedule and begin getting firm (written) commitments from volunteers.  Also decide on a time for the registration training session.

 

Make up a camera-ready list of contributors/sponsors for inclusion in the program.  Have all program information camera-ready for the printer.

 

Make sure person in charge of student papers has necessary information for scheduling judges, and rating forms.

 

Confirm all commitments – call anyone and everyone with whom you have agreements for the week of the meeting.  If you are too busy to follow-up on a commitment, assign it to somebody that you are sure will take care of it.  Get commitments in writing.

 

Collect banners, signs, and logos from event sponsors to use during the meeting.

 

The local host will print the program as late as possible while still giving yourselves time for unforeseen circumstances (30 days).  Work with AFS Office on final format.  Make sure AFS office proofs final program book.  The more withdrawals and program changes you can catch before going to press, the less confusion there will be at the meeting. ORDER EXTRAS.

 

AFS office will make master CD of the program with local hosts input.  The manufacturing of the CD depends on wherever the price is the best.

 

Will parking be a problem?  Something to think about is that our members don’t like to pay

much.  If not negotiated beforehand, negotiate with hotel, convention center or parking vendor.

 

Plan on having an information-message center near, but separate from, the registration table.  If this is not provided in a convenient location, the registration crew will be bombarded with questions they do not have time to answer.  Also, arrange to have a phone at the registration table for work-related communication.  The information desk should have a phone as well.  This can double as the lost and found station.

Plan to have a bulletin board for posting of jobs and a separate one for posting of messages. Make sure you have checked with the registration subcommittee to see if anyone has special

needs.

 

AFS staff will begin sending name tags, receipts and envelope labels for pre-registered attendees.

 

August

 

Have a bag-stuffing party with lots of people.  Stuff generic bags then put personalized items (name badge, receipt, special events tickets, etc.) in manila envelopes. Put name in top corner of envelope and alphabetize.

 

Make up generic signs that can be customized and posted at a moment’s notice.  Use various sized sheets, some vertical, some horizontal, that have the AFS logo and enough space to print necessary information.  Also, make several signs with the logo and arrows pointing in different directions to post where you might find it helpful at the last minute.

 

Avoid hand-written (ad hoc) signs.  Use professional equipment or a fast vendor.

 

Confirm all commitments – again – the week before the meeting.  Make sure everyone knows when they’re supposed to be where, with how much of what.  Don’t let anything fall through the cracks.

 

Make sure there is an open line of communication with the hotel staff.  Provide a program and other pertinent information to the concierge.

 

Give caterer all updated numbers for the various functions.  Go through all details with hotel and convention center on set-up, props, food and beverage, entertainment, timing of their roles, etc.

 

Make sure everything is set for the Plenary Session.  Some speakers may need to be picked up at airport, etc.  Make a “dry run” if there is any audio/visual equipment involved.  Be sure pre- Plenary breakfast is set up for AFS Officers, Executive Director and speakers.

 

Set up the rooms in advance so you can make a sweep to check for details.  Every time a room is changed – seating or AV – check it well before its next use.

 

Let the caterer know you’ll want pitchers of water and glasses for the speakers in each meeting

room.  Replenish during the breaks.

 

Give the convention center/hotel a list of individuals with authority to make decisions, commit funds, etc.  You can identify these people with your group’s specific apparel, or with gold stars on their name badges.

 

Plan to have “gofers,” with vehicles, on-site.

 

Assign an informed individual to be stationed at the entrance to the opening “mixer.” People who have just rolled into town will be full of questions about when and where they can register, the schedule for the week, etc.

 

Have a “briefing” for the AFS staff as they are often approached for information that is as

foreign to them as the rest of the out-of-towners.

 

Have a pre-convention briefing with hotel staff, your committees, and AFS staff so everyone will know who the key players are.

 

Have programs at the headquarters hotel.  They receive many phone calls and requests for information and should be kept as informed as possible.

 

Label lights in the meeting rooms and if possible, set the dimmers to preselected levels..

 

A Daily Bulletin is a good idea especially for program changes, new items, etc.  Can be slipped under doors of hotel room or kept at the registration desk.

 

Have key people carry a list of important phone numbers and keep a list at the information booth as well.

 

Have back-up plans for all the worst-case scenarios.  Once the meeting starts you’ll be dealing with the many “challenges” that pop up.  Have your cell phones or radios (12-18 in the meeting office with necessary chargers).  This is where all the pre-planning and good working relations with convention center/hotel personnel pay off.  There’s still a lot of running around and the behind-the-scenes pace is hectic (if not frantic) so you’ll barely be aware of the fact that the meetings are taking place and all is running smoothly.  Remain calm, flexible and available. Many decisions will have to be made at a moment’s notice. You will find that a core group of 5-

6 Local Arrangements Committee members will be busy non-stop from Day 1 through Day 9 nearly 18 hours/day.  Again, the more committed individuals are, the better.  Don’t waste your time thinking about which technical sessions you’d like to sit in on, because it will never happen (unless of course you ask someone to “hold” your radio and disappear for a couple of hours).

 

Annual Meeting Structure And Organization

 

Organizers should strive to structure their meeting leadership according to this format: General Meeting Chair and Program Chair.  The General Meeting Chair is the person who “bridges the gap” between Program and Local Arrangements functions, and who plays a very significant role in fundraising for the Annual Meeting.

 

General Meeting Chair: The General Meeting Chair (GMC) should come from a leadership position within the host chapter, will usually live in close geographic proximity to the proposed site of the function, and normally will occupy a position of managerial leadership in the local aquatic resource community.  Usually recommended by the local organizing committee, this individual will eventually need to be appointed by a sitting AFS President.  Often, the GMC will have played some role in the bid presentation to the Time and Place Committee considering that year’s meeting, and will work with the eventual AFS President in coordinating interactions between Program and Local Arrangements functions, especially facility needs-related requirements and budgets.  Also, the GMC will help ensure good communications with that year’s AFS President, and between the Program and Local Arrangements committees.  The GMC will oversee all Local Arrangements functions and the budget for all elements of the proposed annual meeting.  The GMC will normally assist the organizing committee with local fundraising efforts for the intended meeting, through his or her extensive contacts in the regional aquatic resource community.  A GMC can serve as an effective point-of-contact for the AFS Office and the AFS Officers.  The future AFS President of the intended meeting will maintain direct communications and information exchange with both the Program Chair and GMC in collaboration with, and with significant input from the Society’s Executive Director.  AFS staff will provide guidance on annual meeting budgets and required oversight in approving annual meeting-related facility contracts.

 

Local Arrangements Chair: The GMC may serve in this capacity as well or appoint a Local

Arrangements Chair.

 

Program Chair (PC): This individual(s) coordinates all aspects of annual meeting program activities.  There may be different chairs for symposia, contributed papers and posters.  This person(s) has full autonomy to work directly with the future AFS President of the intended meeting and the Executive Director to achieve mutual program-related activities and goals.  He or she is also expected to work in close harmony with the GMC and local volunteers regarding room scheduling and facility needs.  The Program Committee will be responsible for coordinating the technical program with other meeting activities and with coordinating all program logistics with the GMC and the AFS Office.

 

The Program Chair(s) is selected by a newly installed Second Vice-President to oversee the Program-related functions of an annual meeting four years hence.  The Program Chair must be ultimately and officially appointed to this position by the sitting AFS President in the year

they become Program Chair.  In the interim years, the Program Chair-designate will be appointed by various sitting Presidents to serve as a member of each AFS Program Committee beginning three years in advance of chairing their specific Program Committee.  This ensures continuity of Program-related operations within the Society, and it promotes appropriate training for undertaking one of the most important and highly visible positions within AFS: that of Program Chair.  The Program Chair is also expected to serve as a highly informed member of the Program Committee during the year following their Chairperson role, to pass on his or her substantial knowledge to new leaders.

 

The Program Chair helps the future AFS President and the Executive Director achieve Program- related objectives for the planned conference.  Usually, the future AFS President will oversee Plenary Session activities for the Annual Meeting, at which they preside, including invitations to appropriate Plenary speakers.  The future AFS President will coordinate the selection of Plenary speakers with the Program Chair.  AFS may provide transportation, complimentary registrations, and up to two nights lodging for each Plenary speaker.  (The AFS staff normally coordinates the logistics of travel and all other associated arrangements for each Plenary speaker.)  The future AFS President will also provide guidance about desired sessions that highlight his or her

Program of Work for the year.  However, the Program Chair has wide latitude in recommending specific sessions and other Program Committee helpers, and in soliciting sessions and reviewing abstracts submitted to his or her Committee.  The Program Chair must organize the First Call for Sessions (published in Fisheries) during September of the year preceding the target Annual Meeting.  The First Call for Papers is usually announced by November of the preceding year.

 

Program Chairs may wish to solicit help in the form of a local Co-Chair(s).  Because AFS Program Chairs rarely live in the city of the planned meeting, it can be extremely helpful to solicit Co-Chair assistance from one who does.  This Co-Chair can perform meeting room site visits – an exceedingly valuable function in coordinating room assignments for specific sessions, based on first-hand knowledge about the peculiarities and room sizes of the meeting facilities. For example, some sessions (expected to be popular) must have large rooms set aside for anticipated increased attendance.  A Program Co-Chair can also assist with scheduling, organizing sessions that highlight local or regional issues, and in coordinating the review of

submitted abstracts, particularly those intended for the Poster Session. It is important to avoid the scheduling of a popular session in a room too small for comfortable seating by all attendees.  A local Program Co-Chair provides Program Committee representation during the periodic

 

pre-conference meetings held by the Arrangements Committee.  They may also be logical choices to oversee the Contributed Paper sessions and/or Poster Sessions.

 

The Program Chair must give careful thought to selecting session chairs and a poster session chair that has a proven track record in assembling high-quality speakers.  The Program Chair must closely coordinate all activities (especially budget needs and projections) with the GMC.

 

The following policy should be made known to all attendees:

 

  • Videotaping, audio taping, or photographing the presentations is strictly prohibited.

 

  • Mobile phones and pagers and other devices generating sound must be turned off in the session room.

 

  • Attendees using laptop computers, personal digital assistants, or other electronic devices generating light must sit in the back half of the room to avoid disturbing fellow attendees.

 

Local Arrangements

 

The Local Arrangements Committee (comprised of subcommittee chairs) will be headed by the GMC who must delegate responsibilities early in the game. It is desirable that the GMC be headquartered in close enough proximity to the meeting site to permit easy personal contact with hotel and convention facility staff at all times.  The subcommittees of the Local Arrangements Committee are recommended as follows:

 

Suggested Subcommittees: Accommodations Audio Visual Aids

Banquet, Social Activities, and Entertainment

 

Budget and Finance Child Care Communications Fundraising

Hospitality (companion program) Photography

Printing (oversight, most functions performed by AFS staff) Program Committee Rep (Co-Chairs)

 

Publicity and Media Relations

 

Raffle (may be chaired by a chapter outside the meeting area) Registration (oversight, most functions performed by AFS staff) Signs

Spawning Run

 

Students

 

Tours, Transportation, and Information

 

Trade Show

 

Welcoming and Protocol

 

Expected Communication:

 

Begin a list of key elements and add-on as the need arises.  The more people you involve throughout the planning stages, the smoother things will run during the meeting.  Each person in charge of each area is responsible for recruiting the help he/she will need to get the job done.  By the end, you will need to assign someone to every detail to alleviate last minute confusion and problems.  Develop a time line, a check list, and use them (see past annual meeting documents that summarize this chronology, available from AFS Office.)

 

The GMC will be in complete charge of all social activities, facility functions, and the budget of the meeting, but all budget expenditures above $10,000 must be cleared with the AFS Executive Director first.  The GMC will have authority over all matters pertaining to arrangements for the meeting, will authorize changes, monitor progress of subcommittees to handle the various divisions of responsibilities, and will coordinate relative responsibilities with AFS staff and hotel and meeting center representatives.  AFS staff will meet with the GMC and the Local Arrangements Committee as needed for site inspections, negotiating with hotels, etc. and will review and assist in formation and refinement of the meeting budget.  The AFS Executive Director will approve proposed budget and sign all contracts with hotels and other facilities.

 

1.  The GMC will submit monthly reports during June, July, and August preceding the meeting, to the AFS President and Executive Director on activities concerning the planning of the meeting.  A detailed report and a meeting budget will be presented to the AFS Governing

Board for approval at its August/September meeting preceding the Annual Meeting.  This budget must be adhered to.  Any substantial changes must be cleared by the Executive Director before implementation.

 

2.  The GMC will meet with the subcommittees, as necessary, to outline their functions and orient the members as to what is expected before, during, and after the meeting.  The GMC will serve as an ex-officio member of all subcommittees.

 

3.   The GMC will have the authority to accept contributions or sponsorship of any portion of the meeting activities, supplies, in-kind services, etc.  This Chair must approve any and all contributions tendered, before any can be confirmed by any subcommittee personnel.  All offers should be made in writing and all confirmations will be made in writing by the GMC.  Should there be a perception of a potential conflict of interest in any sponsorship, the GMC may discuss this with the AFS Executive Director.

 

4.   The GMC or  the delegated committee will list all monetary and material contributions in the official meeting program and will see that sponsor participation is properly recognized at appropriate events, by letter.

 

5.  The GMC will coordinate the preparation of the meeting budget with the AFS Executive Director. AFS establishes reasonable registration fees.  The Local Arrangements Committee prepares an analysis of meeting costs and a budget.  Be sure to include a contingency for the unforeseen expenses that inevitably come up, 10-15% of all other fixed costs.  The total meeting cost can then be divided by the anticipated number or registrants and the resulting figure added to the basic registration fee structure to arrive at a final registration fee structure that will be discussed with AFS President and Executive Director and approved by the Governing Board. Ultimately, however, meeting budget decisions are the responsibility of the AFS office.  It is critical that local costs be used to estimate major expenditure items.

 

6.   Upon being selected, it is critical to reserve immediately all meeting and lodging facilities that will be required before and during the meeting.  AFS staff will negotiate contracts with the hotel and/or convention center and make a copy available to the GMC.

 

7.   Begin thinking about off-site functions such as a fish fry, picnic, and “Spawning Run” well in advance of your meeting. Try to add some local flair. Visualize a good time and make sure everyone has fun.

 

8.   Remember that the key to a successful meeting is early planning and having contingency plans for everything.  The GMC needs to have an interest in every detail.  Be sure to be involved.

 

9.   If possible, reserve meeting space so that all technical sessions are on the same level of the hotel/convention center.  Rooms need to be large enough to hold people comfortably.  Make sure there is enough flexibility to switch rooms at the last minute if a session looks too full.  Make certain that American Disability Act requirements can be met and that “green” meeting requirements are met.

 

10.   Make use of large, open spaces.  House the trade show (approximately 60 exhibitors), poster session (100 boards), AFS publication sales, raffle display, and all coffee breaks in one “grand hall”, which works very well for drawing traffic for both Poster Session participants and Trade Show exhibitors.

 

11.  In addition to the space needed for the technical sessions, several rooms will be needed for various meetings (Governing Board and Section Business Meetings) as well as a handful of rooms at the headquarters hotel.  Don’t forget to book two additional ad hoc rooms for the week as well as audio/visual preview rooms.  It’s helpful to have an A/V office to which all A/V questions can be directed (next to the preview rooms).  Have back-up equipment.   It is not safe

 

to assume that each speaker will bring his/her own carousel.  An extra LCD projector is a good idea. Also, reserve a meeting room for the AFS/Local Arrangements Office.

 

12.   Coordinate the final wrap-up reports from all subcommittee chairs.  Reports on attendance, meeting and guest rooms used, counts on special meal functions, final budget, and report of income and expenses are all very helpful in planning future meetings.  Each subcommittee

should submit a final report.  These reports are kept on file in the AFS Office and are available to all future subcommittee chairs as guides.   Make the wrap-up session as brief as possible, highlighting the main points only.

 

Accommodations Subcommittee

 

The Accommodations Subcommittee will work directly with hotel management personnel and AFS staff and will be responsible for providing all guests and dignitaries with appropriate conveniences.

 

1.  The Accommodations Subcommittee will make the necessary general arrangements for all meeting rooms including the meeting office. The meeting office should be ready on the Thursday morning before the meeting and equipped with a minimum of four computers with capability of sending and receiving e-mail and word processing and spread sheet software, one laser printer, good quality copier with extra toner and paper supply, phones, and the usual office furnishings and supplies.  AFS staff and the local hosts should share the same office.

 

2.  The Accommodations Subcommittee Chair will keep a schedule of all meetings (technical, business, etc.) and all activities, room arrangements, and AV requirements.  This master schedule should be kept on a spreadsheet.  Prior year formats are available.  This information is subsequently provided to the hotel and or conference center so it is very important that all activities be recorded accurately and all changes are kept up to the minute, as well.  If possible obtain the conference center or hotel’s master room schedule to verify your information and coordinate adjustments.

 

3.   One member of this Subcommittee shall be on duty at all times from 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and shall be headquartered in the meeting office.

 

4.   The Subcommittee Chair will oversee all arrangements needed for AFS business meetings and technical sessions, seeing that an ample number of chairs, rostrums, podiums, etc. are available and convenient.

 

The following chart gives examples of events that are arranged by the AFS office and coordinated with the local committee for room space.  All food and beverage, AV needs etc. will be the responsibility of the AFS office and they will deal with the hotel directly.  All charges for these events will appear on a separate bill and are not considered part of the meeting budget.  The President’s Suite will be stocked with food (snacks) and beverage paid for by the AFS office.  It is extremely helpful if a local person is

assigned the responsibility of buying these groceries using a list that the AFS office will provide and have it ready by Wednesday evening.

 

 

 

Day Event No. Attending
Thursday 8-5 Management Committee 18
Friday 8-5 Governing Board Retreat – off site 45
Saturday 8-5 Governing Board Meeting Hollow rectangle for 45 and peripheral seating for 50 100
Saturday 5-8 Governing Board Social – work with local host to find suitable site with unique venue 60
Sunday 9-noon Time & Place Comm. 10
Sunday Noon Journal Editors lunch 12
Monday 7-8 AM Plenary Speakers Breakfast 10
Monday Noon – 1 PM Awards & Plenary SpeakersLunch – in President’s Suite 20
Monday 3-5PM Journal Editorial BoardsMeeting 45 people
Tuesday 7 -9 AM Fisheries breakfast 7 people
Tuesday Noon-1:30 Awards Luncheon 30 people
Wednesday Noon-2 PM Past Presidents Lunch 17 people
Thursday 7 -8:30 AM Incoming Governing BoardBreakfast 40 people

 

 

 

Audio Visual Aids Subcommittee

 

1.   This Subcommittee will supervise all arrangements needed for microphones, pointers, screens, projectors, and other types of visual aids such as bulletin boards, chalk boards, etc. Trained operators of projection equipment shall be provided and instructed to arrange a review of material to be projected with each speaker prior to the opening of the session.  An A/V room for participants to review slides, tapes, etc. is to be provided.  Loud speaker systems shall be

checked and adjusted for each speaker.  (Note: The Program Chair shall require all moderators,

 

conveners, and session chairs to submit written requests regarding meeting room set-ups and equipment to the GMC.) Buying some AV equipment is sometimes more economical than renting.  Flip chart pads, electronic timers, portable microphones, and laser pointers are good examples.  See what the previous year’s committee is willing to pass on.

 

2.   Students can be used to assist with AV equipment operation in return for complimentary or reduced registration.  If this is done, it is important to control the number of hours each student must work in return for the registration fee and to monitor their attendance in the sessions.  Time cards can be used.  It is a good idea to have backup students.  A training session must be scheduled early in the meeting week for all student volunteers and others who will be handling AV.  A separate Subcommittee Chair could be in charge of all student volunteers.

 

Registration Subcommittee

 

The Registration Subcommittee and the AFS office will be in charge of registration for all functions during the convention. Computer expertise on this committee is strongly advised.

 

1.   The AFS office will design the registration form in consultation with the Registration

Subcommittee.  AFS will also design the online form.

 

2.   Registration processing will be done by the AFS Office.  Money will be wired to the local

host’s bank account on a periodic basis established by host and AFS Office.

 

Onsite Registration

 

3.   It will be necessary to open the registration area on Saturday so that pre-meeting subcommittees and dignitaries will be able to register.  Saturday is a good time to pre-test procedures with early-registering members of the Governing Board.  It is desirable that the registration desk be staffed on the following schedule:

 

Pre-Meeting Day (Saturday)                                                           12:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Day I (Sunday)                                                                                10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Day II (Monday)                                                                               7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Day III (Tuesday)                                                                              7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Day IV (Wednesday)                                                                        7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Day V (Thursday)                                                                                    7:00 a.m. to noon

4.   The AFS Office is responsible for printing badges, envelope labels, and receipts.  Names must be large enough to read easily. Badge format will be reviewed by local host before being printed.

 

5.   It is important that all registration personnel be familiar with events, locations, etc.  A training session beforehand is strongly advised.  AFS staff will process all onsite registration. Local host will handle preregistered attendees.

 

6.   Stickers or letters on badges work well for social events, but you must monitor entrance to events carefully which requires additional staffing.

 

7.   Beginning about 2 months before the meeting, weekly preregistration totals should be sent to the local host registration chair.

 

8.   Exhibiting companies receive two complimentary registrations with each booth reserved and must be figured in the budget.

 

9.  Ribbons for exhibitors, staff, hosts, officers, Pro Club, etc. will be ordered by the AFS Office and sent to the subcommittee chair.  They will be put into the registration packets which the local host prepares.  AFS Office will provide the labels to put on the registration envelopes.  Many times there are leftover ribbons from the previous year and they are passed directly from old

chair to new chair. The local host is responsible for ordering meeting bags and stuffing them prior to the meeting.  A large stuffing party is a good way to accomplish this task.

 

10.  AFS Office will begin sending registration data for the printed badges, receipts and envelope labels to registration subcommittee in July.

 

11.  Local registration committee will deliver registration bags to the Governing Board members on Saturday.

 

Budget and Finance Subcommittee

 

1.   The Budget and Finance Subcommittee will be responsible for all funds received and expended before, during, and after the convention and will work closely with the GMC and subcommittee chairs.  Setting the budget is an important task of the meeting.  Accurate figures for expenses are necessary; allowing room for slight changes after the budget is set.  Have subcommittees meet with appropriate local vendors to secure quotes.  Read all the wrap-up reports from previous annual meeting chairs.  Since AFS assumes all the financial obligations of the meeting and there is no financial liability to the host organization AFS is ultimately responsible for the meeting budget.  A draft budget should be prepared by the local host and submitted to the AFS Executive Director by June of the year before the meeting.  It is important that the Executive Director has adequate time to go over the host’s recommended figures.  The AFS Office will take into consideration all the concerns of the local host and the AFS Executive

Director will retain final approval.  The GMC will present the budget to the Governing Board for approval at the Annual Meeting prior to theirs.

 

2.   It shall be the responsibility of this subcommittee to collect local donations and contributions, issue proper receipts, pay bills, and when all bills are paid, transfer excess revenue to the AFS Executive Director, along with a financial statement accounting for receipts and disbursements

of all funds.  If all bills are not paid by the end of the year, transfer excess revenue to the AFS Office at that time and refer all remaining bills to the same.  The meeting facility representative

 

should understand the difference between the Society and the local host. Two master accounts will be established at the headquarters hotel, one by the host and one by AFS.

 

3.   The Budget and Finance Chair will secure “sales-tax-exempt status” from the state or use the local Chapter’s or Agency’s sales tax exempt certificate if possible.  This is not the same as an EIN number.  It may take almost a year to accomplish this.

 

4.   The Budget and Finance Subcommittee Chair will open an account in one of the local banks under the name of “American Fisheries Society Meeting” and all meeting income shall be deposited to this account.   These accounts should be established at least 12 months prior to the meeting.  One or two people should be authorized to sign checks, usually the chair of this subcommittee and the General Meeting Chair.  The AFS Office will provide any paperwork necessary to open the account.  Any expenditures and disbursements made from the “American Fisheries Society Meeting” account must be approved by the GMC.

 

5.   AFS staff and The Budget and Finance Chair will be responsible for providing the necessary cash drawers and the change needed at the opening of each session.

 

6.   The Budget and Finance Chair will present a financial statement to the General Meeting

Chair upon completion of all transactions within 30 days after the close of the meeting.

 

7.   Review (daily) all bills and banquet orders with the Manager of Convention Services at the hotel in order to check for errors.  It is easier when activities are fresh in your mind.

 

8.   Arrange for a safety deposit box at the meeting hotel.

 

Fundraising Subcommittee

 

The Fundraising Subcommittee shall be responsible for soliciting local contributions and sponsorship of events/activities at the meeting to reduce registration costs for participants.  It is critically important that this function be started more than a year in advance of the meeting, planned well, and fully carried out.  Subcommittee staffing is critical.  Extroverts are needed who are well-connected and who believe completely in the AFS mission who can convincingly argue for the level of support needed.  The Chair of this subcommittee should work with the AFS Executive Director and the AFS President in order not to duplicate solicitations. (Contributions from national and international sources are the responsibility of the AFS Office).

 

1.   The Fundraising Chair will be responsible for setting preliminary and final fundraising goals in concert with the GMC and Budget and Finance Subcommittee.

 

2.   The Subcommittee will define opportunities for event sponsorship in conjunction with the annual meeting.

 

3.   The Fundraising Chair will coordinate strategy with the AFS Executive Director to ensure that annual meeting fundraising efforts complement general Society fund raising.

 

4.   Strategies should be developed for individual, corporate, and agency contributions.  In each case, target lists should be compiled, AFS members designated to make the needed contacts, schedules defined and appropriate recognition given.

 

5.   The subcommittee’s goal, in addition to developing needed support, should be to make every donor/sponsor feel adequately recognized and that they are getting good value for their contribution.

 

6.   Make a list of events, with tentative costs, that can be passed on to prospective sponsors. Be cautious of offers that include conditions or have strings attached.

 

7.   It takes a while to get the word out and drum up interest in the meeting, so begin early.  It is much easier to get sponsorship for a specific event or specific product than to solicit general financial contributions.  Remember, all events may be sponsored.  Your list should cover a wide financial range to meet various budgets. Coffee breaks, meeting bags, banquet, receptions for past presidents, entertainment, printing of program and abstracts, signs, transportation, audio visual aids, etc. are excellent sponsorship opportunities. Make sure you let the prospective sponsor know how he/she will benefit.  If they provide a banner, it can be displayed during the event they sponsor, or a poster can be made.  A verbal announcement may also be made, and they will be recognized in the November issue of Fisheries following the meeting.  Play up their exposure!

 

8.   Donations-in-kind may also be solicited.  Try for donations of seafood, soft drinks, beer, wine, printing, etc. Even a small donation of snacks is welcome for the hospitality suite.  If the host facility will not allow you to bring in donated beverages or if the corkage fee is extremely high see if you can negotiate a cash donation from the vendor and in return let them know you will feature their products at the social (if possible).  This may be an alternative arrangement if the facility fees are cost prohibitive.

 

9.   Again, begin early in order to get into the budget cycle and think of ways to make donations feasible from contributors.

 

Social Activities, & Entertainment Subcommittee

 

1.   The Social Activities, and Entertainment Subcommittee will plan, organize, and oversee all general meeting social functions including coffee breaks.  Governing Board activities will be the responsibility of the AFS Office unless the Subcommittee wishes to plan an evening social for

the Governing Board on the Saturday night prior to the start of the meeting.  Check with the AFS Office Manager about this event.

 

2.   Preparation of a closing social and other entertainment must be started well in advance of the meeting in order to economically contract for high quality, appropriate entertainment.  Be sure to actually see any entertainment to be sure they do not contain potentially offensive material (especially to minorities, women, and political parties).

 

3.   Social events may include a banquet, a social in the trade show hall, and an informal picnic

or barbecue that reflects the flavor of the local area.  A welcome mixer is usually held on Sunday night, but this night could just as well be left open for attendees to network and explore the local

 

area on their own.  People remember these activities and it is an important part of the meeting. Donated beverages are encouraged at these events in order to reduce costs.  Order more food and beverage than the facility caterers recommend.  You’ll need it!

 

Program Committee

 

1.   The Program Committee will be responsible for coordinating the technical program with other meeting activities and coordinating all program logistics with the GMC.  A Co-Chair can be particularly helpful, especially if they live in the host city.  The Program Chair coordinates all technical content directly with the AFS President.

 

2.   The AFS President will coordinate the selection of Plenary speakers with the Program Chair. AFS will provide transportation, complimentary registration and up to two nights lodging for each speaker. If possible and to control costs, the AFS office will coordinate the logistics of travel and all other associated arrangements for each speaker.

 

3.    The Program Chair should designate an individual to serve as his or her representative to the

Local Arrangements Committee.

 

4.  AFS Staff will coordinate the abstract submission process with the Program Chair and committee and will be responsible for producing a searchable database of the abstracts.  The Committee Chair and Committee are responsible for assigning room, time and numbers to the individual presentations.

 

5.  A Poster Chair is usually appointed as a sub chair since the number of posters has increased in recent years. Prominence should be given to displaying this form of presentation preferably in

the Trade Show Hall. A special viewing time featuring the posters with no competing oral sessions is recommended.

 

PROGRAM COMMITTEE INSTRUCTIONS

 

More than one year before the meeting

 

In late spring or early summer, the Program Chair should work on encouraging symposia on timely subjects at the future meeting, and should take careful note of the balance of marine and freshwater subjects, as the meeting location can sometimes tip the balance in one direction or another. The Program Chair should try to balance marine and freshwater subjects as much as possible.

 

In June, the Program Chair should be involved in the First Call for Papers, which goes in the September issue of Fisheries but is due in early July. The Program Chair should work with the General Chair and the Publicity Chair on this and future Calls for Papers. The Program Chair should correspond with the current Program Chair or the Abstracts Coordinator about soliciting symposium proposals that are in a useful and effective format and pin down all the actual dates for symposium proposals, contributed abstracts, and symposium abstracts, which are all submitted electronically.

 

A year before the meeting

 

At the Annual Meeting, the Program Chairs should try to attend a meeting with the current Program Committee or Meetings Committee, or try to speak with the current Program Chair about what unexpected issues came up in planning or at the meeting.

 

At some point after the meeting with the current Program Chairs, the Program Chair should arrange to meet with other members of his or her Committee (i.e., the Symposia Chair, the Contributed Papers Chair, and the Posters Chair, if all of those are separate people, and the Abstracts Coordinator to meet and discuss the plan in the upcoming months. They should discuss the space of the next meeting center, and specifically what implication that has for the number of oral presentations that can be accommodated. If the space is somewhat limited, the Program Committee may decide to only allow attendees to submit one oral presentation at the meeting (or, one each to contributed and symposia, maximum), or give symposium organizers an upward

limit to how many oral presentations can be included in their symposium (such as 30). Make a general equation, based on the number of rooms available, the number of days of the meeting, and the number of presentations a day (20), minus the time slots that are already taken up (i.e., for Plenary, Business meeting, Poster Session). The number provided will be a guideline for whether the meeting will be a “big” meeting (oral-presentation-wise), or not.

 

The Abstracts Coordinator will brief the Program Committee on the standards for Abstracts, the Program Book, the Abstracts Book, and the CD. As stated on the abstract submission form, abstract text must not be more than 250 words, and titles cannot contain acronyms. Common names should be used in place of scientific names in titles (unless the common name is not widely known, and titles may only have proper nouns and the first letter of the first word

capitalized. The Program Book will contain a grid of presentations, which will display date, time, room, title and the first five authors, as well as an index of authors. The CD will be made up of the Program Book contents, information on awards, supporters, exhibitors, and the raffle, in addition to an abstract search engine and information about AFS. The Abstract Book will contain titles, authors, and full abstract texts for all presentations and is ordered by symposium and contributed session.

 

During the Fall and into December, the Program Committee should continue to encourage colleagues and potential symposium organizers to get a symposium together, and submit a proposal. Once the deadline for symposium proposals occurs, the Program Chair can either review the proposals him or herself, or pass them along to a small proposal-reading committee, if he or she has organized that. In either case, symposium organizers should be informed of their acceptance as soon as possible, and certainly before the mid-January deadline for contributed abstracts. Symposium abstracts can be submitted after the contributed abstract deadline passes, and the symposium organizer should be aware that the actual presenter (and not the symposium organizer) should be submitting the abstract.

 

Once contributed abstracts are all in, the Program Chair or the Program Committee can decide to review them for quality. In doing so, the Program Committee may wish to advise contributed submitters to revise their abstracts for whatever reason. Keep in mind that the Abstracts Coordinator will take care of all corrections to abstracts, but that these should be done before the scheduling meeting. The Contributed Chair should also arrange all presentations into sessions,

 

and should order those within the sessions. The Contributed Chair should feel free, with the approval of the rest of the Program Committee, to design different sessions than the ones that submitters chose from the abstract submission form based on the subjects of the abstracts.

 

Once all the symposium abstracts are in (about a month after the Contributed abstracts) the Program Committee should hold a scheduling meeting as soon as possible. The meeting should take place before April, if possible. The Abstracts Coordinator, the Program Chair, and the Contributed Chair must attend this meeting. The Local Arrangements Chair, who has information on the size and layout of the convention rooms, should also participate, if possible. During this meeting, the Program Committee should have a visual layout of the convention and its rooms, and should know the amount of people that can fit into every room that will be used.

The Program Committee should schedule each individual presentation, giving it a Date, a Room, a Start and End Time. New Abstract Numbers should also be used to number symposium presentations consecutively. Symposia will also be numbered in the order of their appearance in the schedule.

 

Once the schedule is made, the Abstracts Coordinator and the Technical Coordinator will develop the searchable database, which will be posted on the web. Meanwhile, the Program Committee should draw up general guidelines for presenters, including oral and poster presenters. This information should include information about the technical requirements, and whatever other information (i.e., how to make a good presentation) the Program Committee is interested in detailing.

 

Once those materials are ready to be disseminated, the Program Committee and the Abstracts Coordinator will share those materials with the GMC, and then will send an email to all presenters, informing them of the newly-available schedule and the meeting website, which contains general information about their presentations and the meeting. The email should also point out the necessity of meeting registration (and paying for that registration).

 

Once those emails are sent out (early April), the Program Committee and the Abstracts Coordinator should be in contact to convey any cancellations that they become aware of. The Abstracts Coordinator will change the schedule to fill gaps left by cancelled presentations up until the printed-materials deadline. The Abstracts Coordinator will also begin working on the Program Book and Abstracts Book. The Abstracts Coordinator will send drafts to the Program Committee for their review and will consult with them on any questions. The Program Book and Abstracts Book should be sent to the printer as late as possible, so that it can be as updated as possible (since cancellations come in often).

 

Once the materials are being printed, the only thing left for the Program Committee to do is to make sure all cancelled presentations are referred to the Abstracts Coordinator, who keeps a running list of post-print cancellations, and will make an Addendum to the Program, which will be handed out at Registration when the Meeting begins.

 

Printing Subcommittee

 

1.   This subcommittee is in charge of all proof reading and printing necessary for the meeting.

 

2.   The subcommittee will arrange for artwork for the meeting logo.  AFS staff will design, format and print the meeting program and the abstracts.  The Program Committee and the GMC will have input into the format

 

3.   The AFS staff will be responsible for formatting and burning the master CD of the abstracts database.  They will work with the local host to arrive at a suitable design.

 

4.   The local host is responsible for selecting the art work for the meeting poster and soliciting the artist.  The AFS Office must approve the artwork and be the signer on any contracts with the artist.  AFS will print the poster and mail copies to members of the Fisheries Administrators and Education Section.  The local host may provide labels for additional mailings.

 

Publicity Subcommittee

 

The Publicity Subcommittee will be responsible for soliciting, organizing, and disseminating all news releases to appropriate media before, during, and after the meeting.  In addition, they will invite news media to selected sessions and will arrange interviews between meeting participants and media contacts.

 

Publicizing the annual meeting before, during, and after the event is an important responsibility of meeting organizers.  Publicity can boost meeting attendance, attract coverage for Plenary speakers and symposia, increase AFS visibility, encourage the use of AFS as a source of fisheries news and stories, and prompt articles about fishery science and issues.

 

Development of the AFS Annual Meeting web site is an important form of publicity.

 

Before the Meeting

 

The AFS Office will organize all promotions before the meeting to the AFS membership and related professionals. Promotions in Fisheries are as follows:

 

September – December: two-page spread with Call for Papers January-August: one-page articles of 600 words, photos optional April: “mini-supplement” of four pages plus registration form June: full supplement of 24 pages

All material is due six weeks before the month of publication, except for the First Call for Papers and the June supplement, which should be in eight weeks before. All material must come from a single point of contact (the Publicity Chair or the General Chair). Please provide text and photos and let the headquarters staff create the layout. See previous issues for typical topics, style, and length.

 

Other internal publicity (within AFS) efforts can be to send announcements about the meeting to

AFS unit newsletter editors several months ahead of time. The AFS units coordinator can help

 

arrange this. Also, announcements can be sent to the AFS listserv warning of the expiration of

the room block and/or expiration of the “early bird” registration rate.

 

For external publicity, read the AFS “Working with the Media” brochure.  This outlines information such as how to create a media strategy, how to write a press release, and how to do well in media interviews.

 

Assign one person to be the media liaison.  This person is responsible for promoting the meeting to the media, handling interviews and press inquiries, organizing press facilities at the conference, and working with AFS Fisheries staff on related media efforts.  This person must be knowledgeable about the meeting schedule and highlights, well-spoken, available, and easily accessible.  The person also must be willing to help the AFS Fisheries staff locate lists of local and regional media, review conference press releases, and help promote the meeting in monthly conference promotion articles in Fisheries.

 

Find out from the Program Chair who the plenary speakers are as early as possible.  Major speakers are a huge media draw.  Knowing if they are attending well in advance means additional media work, and promotion can be planned and executed

 

Two to three press releases are distributed prior to the annual meeting.  One is a simple announcement of the conference that is sent to calendar editors at local, regional, national, and international natural resource newsletters, outdoor media, magazines and others.  This often is sent in January of the year of the conference to allow for long magazine lead times (three months average) and to ensure the meeting is listed repeatedly in monthly calendars.  This also allows time for reporters to generate travel funds if they want to cover the meeting.

 

A second press release announcing the plenary speakers and highlighting some of the symposia is sent in July (for a late August meeting) to local newspapers, outdoor writers, and local and regional magazines.  The press release should note whether plenary speakers are available for interviews before or after his or her presentation.  It could also include a list of some or all of the symposia leaders in case media want to pursue a certain fisheries subject.  An annual meeting supplement (bound into the June Fisheries each year) may be included in mailings to top reporters. Contact the Fisheries editor for extra supplement copies.

 

A third release can also be distributed in media kits to local media who live near the meeting (within two weeks of conference). The release could include updates on speakers and symposia, media contacts, and general media information such as location of phones, registration costs if any, availability of interview rooms, permission to photograph speakers, etc.  Press releases should be sent to the WWW page coordinator.

 

Help the AFS Office create media kits.  Media kits might include a copy of the second and third press releases, a program, a meeting supplement, biographies of the plenary speakers, a map of key conference locations, phone numbers of key contracts, information on whether media can attend meals, etc.  Such kits are sent to local media who are likely to attend, and distributed in the press room.

 

The week before the conference, the media liaison and any volunteers should call all local media

(newspapers, magazines, radio stations, TV stations) to personally invite them and answer

 

questions.  Ask for the outdoor writers and environment reporter. You might also pitch the business reporter on the economic importance of recreational and commercial fisheries and the features editor on the human dimensions aspect of fisheries.  A list of media who say they are coming or may come should be faxed to the Fisheries Managing Editor.

 

The Annual Meeting web site should be developed by the AFS office and approved by the General Meeting Chair and the Executive Director and be ready to go live right after the previous year’s annual meeting.  It will housed on the AFS web site and access given to the designated chair.  The AFS webmaster and the local webmaster will be able to make changes.  AFS will maintain the online registration site.

 

During the Meeting

 

Ensure that the media room is kept clean; has pitchers of water; has phone and fax information clearly indicated; has media kits, chairs, pens, paper, and any updated information that needs posting (changed room assignments, altered speaker times); and follows the open-closed schedule for media room hours.  A sign on the door should indicate times and give a contact name and number for after-hours questions.

 

Legitimate media reps (establish their credentials first) are to be issued complimentary registrations.  They are required to wear a name tag showing their affiliation to have access to all events.  They must check in at the registration desk and be directed to the media room (or staff room if no media room is available) for additional materials and assistance.  Then, let them do their jobs!

 

After the Meeting

 

A press release should be sent after the conference to local media, reporters unable to attend the meeting but who expressed interest, and others who may be appropriate.  The release summarizes the key points in plenary sessions, announces passage of any AFS resolutions, and generally highlights newsworthy events and information at the meeting.

 

The media liaison and AFS Fisheries Managing Editor should clip any meeting-generated articles from publications and should note any interviews with broadcast reporters.  Copies should be sent to the AFS office, officers, and organizing committee.

 

The media liaison and organizing committee should note any media problems (i.e., poor location of media room) that might be avoided by the following year’s meeting committee.

 

Key Media Considerations

 

1.   Abstracts of all speeches and technical papers will be reviewed by the Program Committee in advance of the meeting to assess those for which news releases should be developed.  News releases will be requested from selected session chairs and presenters in advance of the meeting to permit creation of a meeting publicity packet.  Copies of speeches which may be in demand during the meeting should be sent to Fisheries Managing Editor for duplication and distribution.

 

2.   Scheduled dignitaries should have high priority for releases, interviews, and pictures.  It is requested that the host organization provide a staff photographer (complimentary if possible) for the meeting.

 

3.   News media representatives within reasonable proximity of the meeting site should be sent publicity packets and an invitation to attend the meeting free.

 

4.   The Publicity Subcommittee must work in close liaison with Fisheries Managing Editor and with the Executive Director.

 

5.   The Publicity Subcommittee will be responsible for providing any special press equipment in the meeting office.

 

6.   The Subcommittee Chair will be responsible for preparing a complete report of activities to the GMC at the close of the meeting.

 

Trade Show Subcommittee

 

The GMC should appoint a Trade Show Coordinator to work with the AFS staff Trade Show

Coordinator or contractor on arrangements for commercial and AFS exhibits.

 

1.   The AFS office or contractor handles brochure development, promotion, mailings; handles the booth reservation forms,  booth assignments, and all related correspondence; handles booth payments; approves and signs all contracts; solicits proposals  for pipe and drape, drayage, security, etc.; works closely with facility staff on floor plans, equipment and table needs, etc.; and assists with on-site management of the show.  The local trade show coordinator assists in attracting regional exhibitors to the show.  AFS will develop a budget and both parties will serve as floor-show managers.  The Trade Show contractor coordinates the needs of the local hosts regarding all equipment rented from the pipe and drape company (i.e., registration counters, poster boards, extra tables and chairs, information counters, etc.)

 

2.  The exhibit hall should have room for a minimum of 60, 10’x10’ commercial exhibits, a trade show registration booth, refreshment/coffee service, and space for several scattered refreshment tables (18,000 sq. ft.).  Space is also required for the following displays:  poster session (10,000 sq. ft.); raffle display (300 sq. ft.); AFS book display (300 sq. ft.); AFS booth (100 sq. ft.); local Chapter display (100 sq. ft.); and a display by the host of the next annual meeting (100 sq. ft.). Total: approximately 30,000 sq. ft.

 

When selecting a site for the trade show, other considerations include food and beverage service

(coffee is served in the show area twice a day; one social event/mixer is generally held in the

trade show area; lunch service should be made available to the exhibitors and attendees); security (is security provided or do you need guards?); location (it is desirable to have the trade show located near the technical sessions); insurance requirements, union rules, etc.

 

The trade show event should run 2.5 to 3 days.  Exhibitor move-in and tear-down require a half day each.  Each exhibitor is given two complimentary registrations.

 

Exhibitors want to be assured that the fee they have spent for the booth will result in sales!  As a “show manager” you should pay special attention to their needs and wishes.  Try to give meeting registrants ample time to visit the trade show.  Hosting coffee breaks, meals, and socials in the trade show hall are excellent ways to draw people into th